Dr Louis Morrill

Dr Louis Morrill

Senior Lecturer in Synthetic Organic Chemistry

School of Chemistry

Research in the Morrill group is focused on inventing new reactions in organic chemistry and developing sustainable catalytic methodologies for synthesis. The utility and impact of our research will ultimately be exemplified through its application in the total synthesis of natural products and molecules of biological significance.

Current core areas of interest include:

  • Borrowing hydrogen (also called hydrogen auto transfer) catalysis
  • Synthetic organic electrochemistry
  • Frustrated Lewis Pair (FLP) catalysis (in collaboration with Dr Rebecca Melen)
  • Exploring new synthetic routes towards cyanamides (in collaboration with Syngenta)

These projects will serve as an excellent platform for talented and highly motivated students to receive a first-class training in synthetic organic chemistry that will thoroughly prepare them for a future career in the chemical industry or in academia.

We are also actively engaged in a number of collaborative research projects in the following areas:

  • Employing enabling tools (flow and mechanochemistry) for organocatalysis (collaboration led by Dr Duncan Browne)
  • Organocatalytic artificial enzymes (collaboration led by Dr Louis Luk)

Please see also:

The Morrill Group

Research Groups: Molecular Synthesis

Cardiff-Bristol-Bath Catalysis CDT

Louis was born in Wick on the north coast of Scotland and obtained his MChem degree (1st Class Honours) from the University of St Andrews, including a one-year industrial placement at AstraZeneca (Charnwood). He completed his Masters research project in 2010 with Professor Andrew Smith.

Staying at St Andrews, he completed his Ph.D. under the direction of Professor Andrew Smith entitled "Organocatalytic Functionalisation of Carboxylic Acids Using Isothioureas", funded by a prestigious Carnegie-Caledonian Scholarship (2010-2014). This work expanded the utility of isothioureas in Lewis base catalysis and demonstrated the first intermolecular bond-forming reaction of carboxylic acid-derived ammonium enolates

For his postdoctoral research, he moved to UC Berkeley to join the research group of Professor Richmond Sarpong, entering the world of complex molecule synthesis. Specifically, he was part of a team that developed highly efficient and concise total syntheses of diterpenoid alkaloid natural products. In 2015, he was appointed as a University Research Fellow in Synthetic Organic Chemistry at Cardiff University and began his independent research career. He is specifically interested in exploring new frontiers in organocatalysis.

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2008

Lecturer on the following courses:

CH4103 Foundations of Organic and Biological Chemistry (*New Course*)
CH3404 Asymmetric Synthesis of Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products - Organocatalysis (*New Course*)
CHT402 Recent Advances in Homogeneous Catalysis - Organocatalysis CDT Workshop (*New Course*)

Leading tutorials on the following courses:

CH4103 Foundations of Organic and Biological Chemistry
CH3104 Introduction to the Solid State & Applications of Spectroscopy
CH3105 Techniques and Methods in Chemistry
CH3202 Applications of Molecular Spectroscopy
CH3203 Organic Chemistry of Multiply Bonded Systems
CH3303 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Project supervisor for the following options:

CH3325 Final Year B.Sc. project
CH3401 Final Year MChem project

Research in the Morrill group is focused on inventing new reactions in organic chemistry and developing sustainable catalytic methodologies for synthesis. The utility and impact of our research will ultimately be exemplified through its application in the total synthesis of natural products and molecules of biological significance.

Current core areas of interest include:

  • Borrowing hydrogen (also called hydrogen auto transfer) catalysis
  • Synthetic organic electrochemistry
  • Frustrated Lewis Pair (FLP) catalysis (in collaboration with Dr Rebecca Melen)
  • Exploring new synthetic routes towards cyanamides (in collaboration with Syngenta)

These projects will serve as an excellent platform for talented and highly motivated students to receive a first-class training in synthetic organic chemistry that will thoroughly prepare them for a future career in the chemical industry or in academia.

We are also actively engaged in a number of collaborative research projects in the following areas:

  • Employing enabling tools (flow and mechanochemistry) for organocatalysis (collaboration led by Dr Duncan Browne)
  • Organocatalytic artificial enzymes (collaboration led by Dr Louis Luk)