Dr Alice Forward

Dr Alice Forward

Research Associate

School of History, Archaeology and Religion

Email:
forwarda2@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 0414
Location:
5.49a, John Percival Building, Colum Drive, Cardiff, CF10 3EU

I am an archaeologist with a particular interest in medieval and post-medieval material culture.

Research Interests

  • Medieval rural economies and the material evidence for markets, fairs and ‘hidden trade’ using finds scatters (PAS data and finds from excavations) as markers.
  • Medieval to early post-medieval pottery, with particular interest in SW England and Wales and the economic and social networks represented by ceramic material.
  • Archaeological evidence for medieval and post-medieval dairying, with particular reference to the deposition of objects that are associated with dairying in contexts and buildings.

Education and qualifications

2009 - 2013: PhD Archaeology, Cardiff University (AHRC funded collaborative doctoral award)

2004 - 2005: MA in Archaeological Research, York University

2001 - 2004: BA (Hons) Archaeology, University of Nottingham

Career Overview

2016 - present: Research Associate, Cardiff University

2014 - 2016: Finds and Environmental Supervisor, Curator of Archaeological Archives and Archaeologist (Artefact Specialist), Historic England, Fort Cumberland.

2013 - 2014: Community Archaeology Trainee, National Museum Wales.

2012 - 2013: Portable Antiquites Scheme Intern, Somerset Heritage Service

2004 - 2009: Field Archaeologist for various commercial units

Professional memberships

Assistant Secretary for the Medieval Pottery Research Group.

Living Standards and Material Culture in English Rural Households

The project (undertaken in collaboration with Dr Chris Briggs, University of Cambridge and funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust), seeks to understand the consumption patterns of medieval rural communities. How did these differ from those of urban communities? How did they change through time? What was the role of everyday objects in the negotiation of social identity? The project seeks to address these questions through the integrated analysis of escheators inventories found in manorial records and material culture excavated from medieval rural sites.