Dr Caroline Lynch

Dr Caroline Lynch

Lecturer in Italian

School of Modern Languages

Email:
lynchc3@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 5637
Location:
2.31, 66a Park Place, Cathays, Cardiff, CF10 3AS

My research interests include female remembrance and representation of the Second World War in Italy. I am particularly interested in the way in which the rise of second wave feminism the substantial developments made in the field of women’s history as well as an increased interest in the Second World War during the 1970s brought about a rewriting of the history of World War Two from a female perspective.

I graduated from University College Cork, Ireland in 2003 with a first class honours BA in Language and Culture Studies (Italian and English). I completed an MA with distinction in European Studies at Cardiff University in 2005. I was awarded my PhD in Italian Studies at the University of Bristol in 2012.  My thesis explores the various ways in which Italian women remember and represent female experiences of the Second World War.

Before coming to Cardiff I worked as a Lecturer in Bangor University and as a Teaching Fellow at the University of Bristol.

I have won various prizes, and scholarships including an AHRC PhD Scholarship (2007); the ‘URQ Henriques Scholarship’, School of European Studies, Cardiff University (2004), and the ‘Etna Byrne Costigan Memorial Scholarship Prize’, Italian Department, UCC (2001).

Speaking engagements

  • ‘The Construction of a Dual Identity in Carla Capponi’s AutobiographicalCon cuore di donna’, 2011 Society of Italian Studies (SIS) Biennial Conference, University of St. Andrews, 6-9 July 2011.
  • ‘Testimony and the Representation of Women and War in Laudomia Bonanni’s La rappresaglia’, NeMLA 42nd Annual Convention, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, USA, 7 – 10 April 2011.
  • Discussion: ‘The Uses of Biography: The Case of the Pieve Santo Stefano Archives’, Writing Lives, Writing Histories: Dark Biography, University of Bristol, 23 June 2010.
  • ‘Women at War: Representations of the Italian Female Second World War Experience in the Archivio Diaristico Nazionale di Pieve Santo Stefano, Italy’, Association for the Study of Modern Italy (ASMI) Postgraduate Conference, University of Birmingham, 16 June 2010.
  • ‘‘Il libro deve essere come un sasso che si butta per colpire’: Testimony and the Representation of Women and War in Laudomia Bonanni’s La rappresaglia’, The SIS Postgraduate Colloquium, University of Warwick, 5 June 2010.
  • Research Experience Talk: ‘Representations of the Italian Female Second World War Experience in the Archivio Nazionale Diaristico di Pieve Santo Stefano’, University of Bristol, 24 March 2010.
  • ‘Perché Tanto Chiasso? The Debate on Elsa Morante’s La Storia Revisited’, The SIS Postgraduate Colloquium, Oxford University, 23 May 2009.
  • ‘Writing Women into History: The Possibility of an Alternative Female Historiography in Italy’ ASMI Postgraduate Conference, Edinburgh, 03 July 2009.
  • ‘From History to herstory: The Creation of an Alternative Female Historiography of the Second World War in Italy from the 1970s to the Present’, Graduate Conference in Italian Studies, UCC, 21 February 2009.

I am currently the year 1 and year 2 language co-ordinator for Italian at beginner’s level. I am involved in teaching the Introduction to Specialised Translation Module as well as Advanced Translation Practice (Italian) and Italian for Professional Purposes. I also contribute to the modules: Innovations in European Literature and Italy: Birth of a Nation.

More widely my teaching interests lie in the field of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Italian literature, history, culture and film. In previous universities I have taught units on the culture of Italian Fascism, Italian memories of the Second World War, the unification of Italy (literary and cinematic perceptions of the Risorgimento), adaptations in European Cinema, modern Italian texts (literary and cinematic) and contemporary Italy (history, culture and society).

My research interests include female remembrance and representation of the Second World War in Italy. I am particularly interested in the way in which the rise of second wave feminism the substantial developments made in the field of women’s history as well as an increased interest in the Second World War during the 1970s brought about a rewriting of the history of World War Two from a female perspective.