Inspiring the next generation of welsh cancer researchers

11 June 2018

Headshot of Sarah Koushyar

Dr Sarah Koushyar from the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute has been selected to be a part of an award-winning education programme, helping to inspire the next generation of cancer researchers.

Sarah has been selected to be a part of the Brilliant Club, a grass roots project that aims to improve access to University work for inner-city children and children from a disadvantaged background.

The Brilliant Club is an award-winning charity that aims to increase the number of pupils from under-represented backgrounds progressing to highly-selective universities. The charity recruits, trains and places doctoral and postdoctoral researchers in schools to deliver academic enrichment programmes to pupils.

Sarah has a background in investigating the mechanisms of prostate cancer and now works as part of two research groups within Cardiff University’s European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, working to understand the role of cancer stem cells in bile duct cancer.

In May, Sarah was selected to be part of the programme, delivering her academic expertise to children in state schools to enrich their learning and help students across Wales reach their full potential.

Sarah said: “I wanted to be a part of the Brilliant Club as I want to promote cancer research as a career path, especially to those from underrepresented groups.

“The programme provides me with a platform to become a role model, and hopefully allowing young girls to see science and cancer research as a potential career path for them.

“I would love to share my passion for my research, showcase the vast opportunity that a career in STEM has to offer and increase the representation of women in STEM in schools.

“Being part of the Brilliant Club gives me the chance to motivate children in their education, allowing them to develop the knowledge, skills and ambition needed to progress to highly-selective universities, as well as sharing the outstanding research that is happening in the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute.”