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Cymraeg

Animal art

26 January 2010

One of Paul’s previous pieces of work, an installation from the 'Leviathan', event, staged at X-Church Gainsborough in February 2009. Photograph by Dan Sumption.One of Paul’s previous pieces of work, an installation from the 'Leviathan', event, staged at X-Church Gainsborough in February 2009. Photograph by Dan Sumption.

The bone structure of animals large and small is to be given a new creative perspective as part of a project that will see an artist and University archaeologist sharing their practice and expertise.

Osteography is a Leverhulme Trust funded project in which artist Paul Evans and Dr Jacqui Mulville of the School of History and Archaeology will work together to produce new artwork to bring to life animal osteology – the detailed study of animal bones.

Examining the bones of animals allows archaeologists to find out how people interacted with animals in the past and can also provide clues about past civilisations and different cultures.

Utilising osteological research by Dr Mulville, Paul will create a number of drawings of skeletal structures for exhibition within the University during his 10 month residency.

He will work closely with postgraduate members of the Cardiff Osteological Research Group to explore animal form and will engage with staff and students across the University and the wider public through workshops, a blog and a website.

Commenting on the project, Paul said: "The drawings that I will be making during my residency will be based on studies of animal bones. These drawings will vary in scale; from massive sperm whale skeletons to tiny mouse bones. Many artists have noticed the strange intrinsic beauty within these structures, but it is through the archaeological narrative that the story of our timeless relationship to other species takes form. This residency will offer the perfect opportunity to creatively explore the connections between animal and human, biology and culture".

Paul has already worked alongside the School on the initiative Future Animals: Friend or Food? which gave young people aged 14-19 from South Wales the opportunity to explore Charles Darwin’s most ground-breaking ideas about evolution and apply them, along with their own thoughts, to design the animals of the next millennium.

The drawings, created by students from St Alban's RC High School, Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Plasmawr and ITEC training solutions will be exhibited at the National Museum Cardiff in February.

Updates on Paul’s Osteography residency at the School will be detailed in his blog which can be found at: http://osteography.wordpress.com/

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