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Language Levels

Recommended level of competence at entry Stages Level of competence reached at end of the ‘Stage’ course (All languages) Common European Framework of Reference
You have no previous knowledge of the language. Stage A You should have a very basic range of simple expressions about personal details and needs of a concrete type. You should be able to understand the simplest everyday polite forms of greetings, introductions, etc. Preparation for A1
You may have studied the language a long time ago and you may be a bit rusty now (one year’s part-time study or ‘rusty’ GCSE in the language studied). Stage B You should have a sufficient vocabulary for coping with everyday situations with predictable content and simple survival needs. You should be able to handle very short social exchanges. You should be able to understand a simple description. Preparation for A2
You may have acquired survival skills in the language and had some opportunity to use the language recently (two years’ part-time study or a good recent GCSE pass in the language studied). Stage C You should be able to confidently cope with everyday situations. You should be able to make and respond to invitations, apologies, etc. You should be able to understand a simple and direct exchange of limited information on familiar and routine matters.
You may have had a good command of the language some time ago and you want to re-activate and build upon your comprehension and expression (three years’ part-time study or ‘rusty’ A-Level in the language studied). Stage D You should have enough language to get by, with sufficient vocabulary to understand topics such as family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events. You should be able to understand the main points in an idea or problem with reasonable precision. Preparation for B1
You have recently completed an A- Level in the language studied and you are ready to take it a step further (four years’ part-time study or A-Level in the language studied). Stage E You should have a sufficient range of language to be able to understand descriptions and arguments on most topics related to family, hobbies and interests, work, travel, and current events. You should be able to identify unfamiliar words from the context on topics related to your field/interests.
You have a very good working knowledge of the language and you want a stimulating course to match and stretch your competencies (five years’ part-time study or Advanced Stage E). Stage F You should be able with some effort to keep up with fast and colloquial discussions. You should be able to understand detailed information reliably. Preparation for B2
You have an excellent command of the language and use it on a regular basis. This level will enhance your near-native language skills (six years’ part-time study or Advanced Stage F). Stage G/H You should have a good command of broad lexical repertoire and a good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. You should be able to understand language effectively for social purposes, including emotional, allusive and joking usage. Preparation for C1