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Centre for Interdisciplinary Film & Visual Culture Research (IFVCR)


Dr Paul Bowman (School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies): Paul is interested in the relationships between film and culture: his book Theorizing Bruce Lee, for instance, focuses on the importance of film in the global dissemination of martial arts as cultural practices. He is also interested in the relationships between cultural theory, cultural politics and film, and is currently writing and editing several books in this area, including monographs on Rey Chow and on Jacques Rancière.

Cardiff sciSCREEN is a cross-disciplinary programme that promotes the engagement of publics with science and the work of the academy. Using special showings of new release films, sciSCREEN uses local academic expertise to discuss contemporary developments in science in an understandable and entertaining way, facilitating debate on the wider social and cultural implications of these advances. These discussions draw on a range of disciplinary perspectives and the broad repertoire of themes found within contemporary cinema. http://www.cardiffsciscreen.blogspot.com/

Dr Carl Cederström (Cardiff Business School)

Dr Louise Child (School of History, Archaeology and Religion)

Dr Sam Clark (Welsh School of Architecture)

Dr Bella Dicks (School of Social Sciences)

Dr Lisa El Refaie (School of English, Communication and Philosophy)

David Evans (film maker) DJ (Dave) Evans, is a film maker/facilitator with directing and writing credits for drama which include BAFTA (Wales) winning film, Daddy’s Girl and shorts Aml FaiFinal Punchline and Mind Games Television credits as director and writer include award winning dramasNuts & Bolts (Royal Television Society Best regional Drama) and Y Pris (Prix D'Europa), Crash (BBC Wales) and Caerdydd (S4C).

DJ Evans Director's Reel

Dave is working with WNO on an opera film in collaboration with composer John O’Hara and librettist Karen Hayes which goes into production in 2013. He is particularly interested in the interaction and impact of new technologies on film development and its implications for working in innovative ways with people and communities. As part of this process he is currently involved in film and drama projects with young people from the Czech Roma Community in Cardiff, asylum seekers and refugees and young people in Bosnia. He is a visiting lecturer in film production at The Atrium, School for Creative Industries and teaches at The Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. He is fluent in Welsh, Catalan and Spanish as well as speaking some Bosnian.

Dr Katie Featherstone (School of Nursing and Midwifery Studies): Katie is a member of thesciSCREEN team, which uses new release film to facilitate debate on contemporary developments in science. It attracts audiences that may be reluctant to attend traditional events branded as ‘science’, and importantly encourages them back to attend on a regular basis. She collaborates with Chapter Arts Centre, which is regarded as one of the most successful multi-disciplinary arts organisations in the UK (www.chapter.org). In addition, Katie has a number of collaborations with filmmakers, has a credited acting role in a short film My Times and is Director of a film and television facilities company (www.Riversidepictures.co.uk).

Dr Kate Griffiths (School of European Studies): Kate’s research focuses on the adaptation of canonical texts across media and language. Her first monograph, Emile Zola and the Artistry of Adaptation (Oxford: Legenda, 2009), focused on adaptation for silent and sound film in Europe and North America. She is currently completing two complementary monographs on multimedia adaptation: Adapting Nineteenth-Century France: Literature in Film, Theatre, Television, Radio and Print (contracted: UWP) and an AHRC-sponsored monograph, Zola and Television. With colleagues in Bristol and Birmingham she runs the ART research cluster: Adaptation, Recreation, Translation.

Dr Matt Hills (School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies)

Dr Casper Hoedemaekers (Cardiff Business School)

Dr Christopher Hood (Cardiff Business School): Christopher is interested in the portrayal of death and disaster in Japanese films. He has been particularly interested in looking at how the understanding and memory of the Japan Air Lines flight JL123 crash, the world’s largest single plane crash, may have been altered due to the films Kuraimazu Hai (Climber's High (2008)) and Shizumanu Taiyo (The Unbroken (2009)). He is also interested in how these two films, and in the case of the former, a TV adaptation also, have varied compared to the original novels, why these variations have come about and what their impact may be.

Dr John Jewell (School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies)

Prof Martin Kayman (School of English, Communication and Philosophy)

Dr Jamie Lewis (School of Medicine, director of sciSCREEN): Cardiff sciSCREEN is a cross-disciplinary programme that promotes the engagement of publics with science and the work of the academy. Using special showings of new release films, sciSCREEN uses local academic expertise to discuss contemporary developments in science in an understandable and entertaining way, facilitating debate on the wider social and cultural implications of these advances. These discussions draw on a range of disciplinary perspectives and the broad repertoire of themes found within contemporary cinema.

Dr Michael Marinetto (Cardiff Business School)

Dr Paul Nicholson (School of History, Archaeology and Religion): Paul is an archaeologist and Egyptologist interested in the use of film in the documentation of archaeology and its presentation to the public both in cinema and on video. He has made an ethnographic video (Potters of Deir Mawas, Egypt) and has assisted in the making of others. His interests include the way in which archaeology and archaeological discoveries enter popular culture through documentary film and how some of these discoveries are then used in the entertainment film industry.

Dr Juliet Odgers (Welsh School of Architecture)

Dr Martin O’Neill (School of Social Sciences): Martin is particularly interested and involved in using film, video, ICT and digital media as a method of engaging hard to reach groups in participatory research and dissemination. Examples of his work in this field can be seen on YouTube.

Martin has also been involved in the production of a number of commercial feature films, such asReaching Higher and Good Arrows

Dr Craig Patterson (School of European Studies)

Dr Siwan Rosser (School of Welsh)

Dr Cristian Suau (Welsh School of Architecture): Cristian’s main research interests are: Cinema Architecture; Urban Photography in Motion; Silent Movies and Modern Living. He is currently leading a design workshop called ‘Cinema Architecture’ in Dubrovnik and he is the director of ECOFABRICA, a collaborative design platform: www.ecofab.org

Dr Win Tadd (School of Social Sciences)

Dr Sean Tougher (School of History, Archaeology and Religion)

Prof Valerie Walkerdine (School of Social Sciences): Valerie is interested in film and visual culture. She has used film in her research in a number of ways: audience research and cultural theory (e.g.,Daddy's Girl: young girls and popular culture), and as a research medium, for example, the use of video diaries and subsequent Channel 4 broadcast. She is also an installation artist and filmmaker and has produced doscumentary work in relation to her research (eg Didn't she do well, Working Pictures).

Dr Jonathan Webber (School of English, Communication and Philosophy): Jonathan's research is at the intersection of ethics and psychology, with a focus on the origins and structure of personal character. He is interested in the use of visual narratives such as film to present, support, or develop ideas in this area.