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2013 - Sir David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough, whose work has spanned more than 60 years, inspired an audience of more than 1000 people with his personal insights into some of the most mysterious, exquisite and colourful families of birds.

The well-known natural history film-maker and broadcaster was celebrating the work of Welsh naturalist Alfred Russell Wallace. He took the audience on a journey to uncover Wallace’s ocean voyage to the Malay Archipelago and his pioneering observations of the bird of paradise.

His lecture marked the start of a series of University events to mark the centenary of Wallace’s death in 1913, which includes a free Public Lecture series, organised by the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences.

 

 

Sir David Attenborough – Biography

Sir David Attenborough OM, CH, CVO, CBE, FRS is Britain’s best-known natural history film-maker. His career as a naturalist and broadcaster has spanned nearly five decades, and he has produced several landmark BBC series, which have introduced millions of people to the wonders of the natural world

Born in London in 1926, and educated at Clare College, Cambridge, he joined the BBC as a trainee in 1952 and launched the first of his influential Zoo Quest series in 1954.

In 1965, he became Controller of BBC2, and after four years, during which the channel became the first in Europe to broadcast in colour, he was appointed Director of Programmes, responsible for both BBC TV channels.

He resigned in 1973 to return to programme making, and in 1976 began work on the first of his major projects, Life on Earth, which aired in 1979.

He followed this with other landmark series, The Living Planet (1984), The Trials of Life (1990), The Private Life of Plants (1995), Life of Birds (1998), Life of Mammals (2002), Life in the Undergrowth (2005), and Life in Cold Blood (2008).

Sir David’s lecture will centre on archival film about Welsh naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace’s ocean voyage to the Malay Archipelago and his pioneering observations of the bird of paradise. Sir David has described Wallace as “one of the greatest of all field naturalists”.