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News and Events

Enrolment information for the 2014–2015 academic year

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Congratulations to all our graduates! Pob lwc! (Good luck!)

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Cardiff student? Under 25? Check out this opportunity from the Reardon Smith Nautical Trust and Challenge Wales!

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Dr Huw Davies awarded NERC grant

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Dr Simon Wakefield, Director of Teaching, gives an overview of the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at Cardiff University.

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News & profiles in the 2014 EARTH newsletter

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Hannah Hughes wins 2014 President's Award of the Geolgical Society of London

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EARTH Graduation 2014!

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Prof Julian Pearce awarded 2014 Murchison Medal by the Geological Society of London

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Dr Hazel Prichard wins Employability Award at Cardiff University's 2014 Enriching Student Life Awards

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Solar forcing, cold winters, and the Little Ice Age

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What you should know about climate change

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Interested in a University – industry partnership? Contact Cardiff's Business Gateway!

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Cardiff EARTH has a YouTube Channel!

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Changes in the sun’s energy output may have led to marked natural climate change in Europe over the last 1000 years

28 Mar 2014

A new study by Cardiff's Dr Paola Moffa-Sanchez and colleagues (including Dr Andres Born, at the University of Bern, in Germany; Prof Ian Hall and Dr Stephen Barker, in Cardiff's School of Earth & Ocean Sciences; and Dr David Thornalley at University College London, formerly of Cardiff) finds that changes in solar activity can have a considerable impact on ocean-atmospheric dynamics in the North Atlantic, with potential effects on regional climate.

The authors examined seafloor sediments to determine how the temperature of the North Atlantic and its localised atmospheric circulation changed over the past 1000 years. Warm surface waters flowing across the North Atlantic, an extension of the Gulf Stream, and warm westerly winds are responsible for the relatively mild climate of Europe, especially in winter. Slight changes in the transport of heat associated with these systems can led to regional climate variability. This study's findings match historic accounts the notoriously severe winters of the sixtheenth and eighteenth centuries, predating global industrialisation.

Predictions suggest a prolonged period of low sun activity over the next few decades, but any associated natural temperature changes will be much smaller than those created by human carbon dioxide emissions.

The team's article appears in Nature Geoscience. The full University news release can be found here.