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Response to UK 2013 greenhouse gas emision data

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Free sailing courses on Challenge Wales in June

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Concentric scratches caused by fracture and spinning during drilling resolve a climate change controversy 

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New papers accepted for publication

 

 

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REF 2014 results announced 18 December

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2015 PhD studentships available

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Microscopes donated to Maldivian school 

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Dianne Edwards has been elected to be a member of the  Academia Europaea 

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Celebrating excellence

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Link between carbon emissions and damage to marine ecosystems poorly understood

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A study of the Amazon River basin shows lowland rivers carrying large volumes of sediment meander more than those carrying less sediment.

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Ian Hall speaking at the GW4 launch at the House of Commons.

 

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Lisa Mol has won the 2014 Southern Wales Geological Society Regional Group’s Early Career Geologist Award

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Lucy Taylor, marine geography graduate, wins 2014 best dissertation prize

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EARTH is on Twitter!

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Cardiff Marine Geography ranked first in UK for student satisfaction

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International Studentship

A fully-funded PhD scholarship (fees and stipend) has recently become available in the School for international students.

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Enrolment information for the 2014–2015 academic year

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Congratulations to all our graduates! Pob lwc! (Good luck!)

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Cardiff student? Under 25? Check out this opportunity from the Reardon Smith Nautical Trust and Challenge Wales!

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Response to UK 2013 greenhouse gas emision data

04 Feb 2015

The Office for National Statistics has just published its final estimates of UK greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 to 2013. In response Professor Paul Pearson, from Cardiff University’s School of Earth & Ocean Sciences, said, 'The UK has adopted tough and binding legislation on greenhouse gases. To achieve the long-term 80% reduction by 2050, a steep downward trajectory is needed. Today's statistics for 2013 show a welcome emissions reduction, although it is not enough to cancel out the previous increase in 2012. The UK just about managed to achieve its interim target for 2008-2012 inclusive, largely because of the recession. Despite the 2013 reduction, the figure is still over 2% above the new average required for 2013-2017. This election year, politicians of all parties need to explain how they will achieve the challenging new emissions reductions in a recovering economy.'