Social Sciences

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of Social Sciences.

Module codeSI0036
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

To develop a critical understanding of major theories of human development and to be able to draw on these theories to describe and evaluate the influence of social relations such as parenting, peer collaboration, special educational needs, social identities, social inclusion, and how people learn in everyday, school and work contexts.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSI0066
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module builds on the material taught on Key Ideas in Year 1. Its principal aim is to deepen students’ knowledge and understanding of social theory by guiding their engagement with key primary texts. Attention is paid to the historical context in which social theorists over the last century-and-a-half have been writing, and to the social changes that may have influenced the changing character of their ideas. Rival perspectives and arguments about the nature of contemporary society are explored, while an emphasis is also placed on the overlapping themes and insights shared by otherwise distinct theoretical traditions. Central to the module is an examination of sociological understandings of the relationship between self and society, and how these understandings draw on theories of power, ideology, morality, science, objectivity, meaning, rationality, and human fulfilment. 

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 40%
  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Class test: 10%
Module codeSI0067
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

To develop students’ knowledge, conceptual understanding and skills of critical enquiry regarding contemporary social policy in the UK.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 40%
  • Written assessment: 45%
  • Presentation: 15%
Module codeSI0072
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

Students will explore the impact of gender relations in public and private life, and evaluate the causes and effects of structural gender inequalities on personal experiences of gender. The module is organised around key themes: concepts of gender; femininities, masculinities & sexualities; contemporary cultural life;  technologies, bodies and the environment. Each theme builds on a number of theoretical and conceptual aspects of sex/gender informed by liberal, radical, marxist/socialist, and postmodern perspectives, and by theories of identity, globalisation, modernisation and embodiment. The module draws on sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives and research.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 40%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeSI0075
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module aims:

  • To explore sociological accounts of how the contemporary division of labour is being restructured, (re)produced and experienced in developed economies;
  • To develop an understanding of the changing relationship between the global division of labour and social inequalities in the UK and US;
  • To examine social and economic inequalities in the contemporary workplace and the consequences for job quality;
  • To provide a knowledge and understanding of the political economy of education, employment and income inequalities since the 1950s;
  • To explore different accounts of meritocracy, employment and economic life to enhance student understanding of inequalities and social justice;
  • To examine the distributional consequences of the division of labour for careers, employment and individual life-chances.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSI0141
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This course will explore the construction, conceptualisation and status of contemporary ‘childhood’ in the UK from a range of academic disciplines and within a variety of contexts.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSI0151
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module aims to provide students with an advanced level of knowledge and understanding of contemporary education and training policy (especially in the UK, but with international comparisons). It will explore the complex and contested nature of education and training policy and how the politics of place reflect and reinforce broader social trends. The module is focused on the analyses of current policy and practice, relating to both the compulsory and non-compulsory phases of education and training, and covers the role of both state and non-state actors in education policy. Analysis of policy within the module explores the general dimensions of contemporary state policy (e.g. marketization and privatisation, public/private sector relations, economic efficiency/social inclusion, individual/collective responsibilities), as well as providing detailed insights into selected policy initiatives (such as, policies on schools, training and skills policy, policies on skills supply and demand, and the expansion of higher education and the so-called knowledge economy).

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSI0158
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

Since the early 1990s, the processes of globalisation have received increasing academic attention. This development raises important questions about the continued significance of nation states, the degree of global uniformity and difference, the effects on the global distribution of wealth and poverty, environmental problems, life chances and life expectancy, and the implications for politics and global governance. This module addresses these and other issues through a comparative approach.

Students will also be able to gain further experience with the secondary data analyses.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSI0163
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

MODULE AIM(S)

To consider some of the most recent developments in sociological thinking and explore the insight they give into contemporary social organisation and social change through reference to increasingly digitized and urbanised social environments.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSI0164
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The aim of the module is to enable students to develop a critical appreciation of power, culture and identity in and through studies of contemporary society, institutions and everyday life. The module focuses, particularly, on interactionist studies and theory as they connect with different theoretical and methodological approaches from sociology, anthropology, and human geography (among others). We discuss, throughout the module, some of the classic and contemporary concerns of the social sciences. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 70%
  • Portfolio: 30%
Module codeSI0184
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will provide a detailed overview of the study of crime and criminal justice by incorporating theoretical and policy issues relevant to gender, race, class and sexual orientation.  The module is intended for students seeking to gain knowledge of criminology, policing, prosecution and the courts, and the sanctioning of offenders.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeSI0203
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

 

MODULE AIM(S)

  • To provide students with a detailed overview of the development of state responses to crime.
  • To consider how penal responses have evolved in contemporary society, paying particular attention to imprisonment and probation practices; issues of reparation, reconciliation, re-integration and re-education; and specific areas of penal practice in how to deal with offenders ‘through the prison gate’ and after conviction;
  • To equip students with an understanding of the challenges involved in turning policy into practice;
  • To consider what the state responses to crime are likely to achieve, in light of what we already know “works”.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeSI0209
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This research-led module examines cutting edge issues in advanced social and cultural psychology. It consists of units representing teaching staff's specialisations. Whilst specific topics may vary from year to year, the module's aim is to facilitate in depth engagement with important debates in the social and human sciences. Students explore research traditions within social and cultural psychology critically and in-depth. The module aims to introduce cutting edge debates and issues in social and cultural psychology within a social science context; and explore contrasting traditions and methodological positions in critical social psychological research practice, concerning topics such as discourse, experience, subjectivity, embodiment and visual culture. 

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSI0220
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

 

MODULE AIM(S)

  • To develop a wide ranging and critical understanding of equality and diversity issues within a variety of learning contexts (both compulsory and post-compulsory).
  • To draw on a range of critical perspectives to explore the interconnections between gender, race, class, disability, sexuality and educational, training and workplace based learning experiences and outcomes.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codeSI0234
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

 

MODULE AIM(S)

This module aims to provide students with a good understanding of sociological approaches to the study of education, drawing on a range of scales and contexts. It explores ‘big ideas’ in the sociology of education, such as inequality, power, and identity and helps students to apply them to contemporary educational issues and debates.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Portfolio: 20%
Module codeSI0235
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module aims to introduce students to debates in the sociology of migration, ‘race’ and ethnicity. It examines competing theoretical explanations of race and ethnicity, international migration and the ways in which race and ethnic relations are constructed. It also examines the social, political and historical conditions under which racial and ethnic hierarchies emerge and reproduce over time and why they continue to be central to the organization of contemporary societies. The focus is primarily on the experiences of ethnic minorities in Britain, but we will also draw on debates and materials in other immigrant destinations, especially the USA.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Presentation: 15%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeSI0248
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

A module in Digital Society: Theory, Method and Data offers an introduction to relevant sociological theories and methods for understanding the emerging contours of digital society. It also provides formal training in research methods and techniques to understand, analyse and make sense of big data with a particular focus on public social media, while exploring the opportunities that digital data offer for social science research more broadly. The course combines training in sociological thinking and research methods with the use of computational tools.

This module is contextualized in terms of the ‘coming crisis of empirical sociology’ (Savage and Burrows, 2007), which is located in the increasing asymmetry between traditional social scientific methods and the power of transactional data generated through the internet. This has led some commentators to question the extent to which university-based sociology and social science can compete with the data rich resources built into the marketing and data generation strategies of the large multi-national corporations that hold and marshal much of this transactional data.

Big Social Data, generated in large part by Social Media interactions, are distinctive from corporate transactional data and ‘conventional’ social science data as they are naturally occurring or ‘user-generated’ and are largely accessible by researchers.   Digital social research tools hold the potential to capture Digital Social Data at the level of populations in real/near-real-time. This offers students the hitherto unrealizable possibility of studying social processes as they unfold as contrasted with their official construction through the use of ‘terrestrial’ research instruments (survey, interviews etc.) and curated and administrative data-sets. The potential for systematic data mining and mixed method analysis in relation to key social science concerns and questions is now possible. The module provides an introduction for undergraduate students to digital social sciences and digital sociology. It also provides a means of augmenting social science research training through the provision of new methodological tools and options for researchers conducting social inquiry in the 21st century.  

Assessment

  • Portfolio: 50%
  • Report: 50%
Module codeSI0250
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module is in the specialist field of medical sociology and the sociology of health and illness.  It presents the key sociological ideas about professional medicine and its power as a social institution; addresses the concerns of modern life as they are lived through the everyday experiences of health and illness; explores the expansion of medicine into personal and collective identities, health practices and bodily concerns; illuminates the forms of exclusion and health inequality that are reproduced at different scales; and critiques the ways in which different ‘ways of life’ are articulated by health experts and policy makers.

This module is divided into four sections:

1.    The rise of professional medicine (professions and practice)

2.    The organisation of health Care (health care systems and technology) 

3.    The experience of health and illness (patients and people)

4.    The distribution of health, disease and death (populations, politics and policy)

The module uses the four themes to introduce to the students key concepts that are relevant to the sociological study of medicine and health.  Cross cutting themes include power and its distribution, health knowledge of different kinds, and forms of challenge and contestation.   

Students will have opportunities to exercise their understanding of contemporary debates about medicine, illness and disease that exist in the political, policy and public spheres; and to chart these debates through past time and into the future. Much of the student learning is based on the global uncertainties – from a sociological point of view – of medical and health knowledge, political institutions, economic and social life and the demands on community, the body and identity.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 70%
  • Examination - spring semester: 20%
  • Presentation: 10%
Module codeSI0260
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

To provide students with an understanding of the different approaches to conceptualise and measure poverty, the structure of the social security system in the UK today and its purposes and aims, recent reforms to social security and their impact on poverty, and a number of challenges relating to poverty and anti-poverty efforts in the United Kingdom.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeSI0263
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will provide a detailed overview of the scholarly study of police and policing, drawing on historical and contemporary developments in theories of policing, policing policy and practice, and academic and applied research on policing.  

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
Module codeSI0264
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module is designed to introduce students to a range of issues around the role of science and technology in democratic societies, with a particular focus on the use of scientific and other expert advice in policy-making and the consequences of this for social science theory and practice.

The module begins by examining the role of science in contemporary society and the different ways in which this has been understood within sociology. This includes ideas such as the ‘risk society’ as well as more recent debates about the social construction of science and technology. In addition to exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different theoretical approaches, this part of the module will examine the practical implications of these theories for topics including scientific advice, the role of media and the challenges of science communication.

The second part of the module turns the examines how these new understandings of scientific work challenge practices within both social and natural sciences. The topics covered will include the understanding of risk – particularly risks associated with science and technology – and how these provoke new ways of thinking about the relationships between citizens and the institutions of the state that seek to regulate their behaviour.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeSI0914
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module builds on the material taught on Key Ideas in Year 1. Its principal aim is to deepen students’ knowledge and understanding of social theory by guiding their engagement with key primary texts. Attention is paid to the historical context in which social theorists over the last century-and-a-half have been writing, and to the social changes that may have influenced the changing character of their ideas. Rival perspectives and arguments about the nature of contemporary society are explored, while an emphasis is also placed on the overlapping themes and insights shared by otherwise distinct theoretical traditions. Central to the module is an examination of sociological understandings of the relationship between self and society, and how these understandings draw on theories of power, ideology, morality, science, objectivity, meaning, rationality, and human fulfilment. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0914
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module builds on the material taught on Key Ideas in Year 1. Its principal aim is to deepen students’ knowledge and understanding of social theory by guiding their engagement with key primary texts. Attention is paid to the historical context in which social theorists over the last century-and-a-half have been writing, and to the social changes that may have influenced the changing character of their ideas. Rival perspectives and arguments about the nature of contemporary society are explored, while an emphasis is also placed on the overlapping themes and insights shared by otherwise distinct theoretical traditions. Central to the module is an examination of sociological understandings of the relationship between self and society, and how these understandings draw on theories of power, ideology, morality, science, objectivity, meaning, rationality, and human fulfilment. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0915
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To develop students’ knowledge, conceptual understanding and skills of critical enquiry regarding contemporary social policy in the UK.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0915
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

To develop students’ knowledge, conceptual understanding and skills of critical enquiry regarding contemporary social policy in the UK.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0917
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Students will explore the impact of gender relations in public and private life, and evaluate the causes and effects of structural gender inequalities on personal experiences of gender. The module is organised around key themes: concepts of gender; femininities, masculinities & sexualities; contemporary cultural life; technologies, bodies and the environment. Each theme builds on a number of theoretical and conceptual aspects of sex/gender informed by liberal, radical, marxist/socialist, and postmodern perspectives, and by theories of identity, globalisation, modernisation and embodiment. The module draws on sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives and research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0917
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Students will explore the impact of gender relations in public and private life, and evaluate the causes and effects of structural gender inequalities on personal experiences of gender. The module is organised around key themes: concepts of gender; femininities, masculinities & sexualities; contemporary cultural life; technologies, bodies and the environment. Each theme builds on a number of theoretical and conceptual aspects of sex/gender informed by liberal, radical, marxist/socialist, and postmodern perspectives, and by theories of identity, globalisation, modernisation and embodiment. The module draws on sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives and research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0918
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10
  • To explore sociological accounts of how the contemporary division of labour is being restructured, (re)produced and experienced in developed economies;
  • To develop an understanding of the changing relationship between the global division of labour and social inequalities in the UK and US;
  • To examine social and economic inequalities in the contemporary workplace and the consequences for job quality;
  • To provide a knowledge and understanding of the political economy of education, employment and income inequalities since the 1950s;
  • To explore different accounts of meritocracy, employment and economic life to enhance student understanding of inequalities and social justice;
  • To examine the distributional consequences of the division of labour for careers, employment and individual life-chances.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0918
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10
  • To explore sociological accounts of how the contemporary division of labour is being restructured, (re)produced and experienced in developed economies;
  • To develop an understanding of the changing relationship between the global division of labour and social inequalities in the UK and US;
  • To examine social and economic inequalities in the contemporary workplace and the consequences for job quality;
  • To provide a knowledge and understanding of the political economy of education, employment and income inequalities since the 1950s;
  • To explore different accounts of meritocracy, employment and economic life to enhance student understanding of inequalities and social justice;
  • To examine the distributional consequences of the division of labour for careers, employment and individual life-chances.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0919
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To develop a critical understanding of major theories of human development and to be able to draw on these theories to describe and evaluate the influence of social relations such as parenting, peer collaboration, special educational needs, social identities, social inclusion, and how people learn in everyday, school and work contexts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0919
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

To develop a critical understanding of major theories of human development and to be able to draw on these theories to describe and evaluate the influence of social relations such as parenting, peer collaboration, special educational needs, social identities, social inclusion, and how people learn in everyday, school and work contexts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0924
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This course will explore the construction, conceptualisation and status of contemporary ‘childhood’ in the UK from a range of academic disciplines and within a variety of contexts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0924
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This course will explore the construction, conceptualisation and status of contemporary ‘childhood’ in the UK from a range of academic disciplines and within a variety of contexts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0928
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Since the early 1990s, the processes of globalisation have received increasing academic attention. This development raises important questions about the continued significance of nation states, the degree of global uniformity and difference, the effects on the global distribution of wealth and poverty, environmental problems, life chances and life expectancy, and the implications for politics and global governance. This module addresses these and other issues through a comparative approach.

Students will also be able to gain further experience with the secondary data analyses.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0928
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Since the early 1990s, the processes of globalisation have received increasing academic attention. This development raises important questions about the continued significance of nation states, the degree of global uniformity and difference, the effects on the global distribution of wealth and poverty, environmental problems, life chances and life expectancy, and the implications for politics and global governance. This module addresses these and other issues through a comparative approach.

Students will also be able to gain further experience with the secondary data analyses.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0930
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To consider some of the most recent developments in sociological thinking and explore the insight they give into contemporary social organisation and social change through reference to increasingly digitized and urbanised social environments.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0930
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

To consider some of the most recent developments in sociological thinking and explore the insight they give into contemporary social organisation and social change through reference to increasingly digitized and urbanised social environments.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0931
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The aim of the module is to enable students to develop a critical appreciation of power, culture and identity in and through studies of contemporary society, institutions and everyday life. The module focuses, particularly, on interactionist studies and theory as they connect with different theoretical and methodological approaches from sociology, anthropology, and human geography (among others). We discuss, throughout the module, some of the classic and contemporary concerns of the social sciences. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0931
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The aim of the module is to enable students to develop a critical appreciation of power, culture and identity in and through studies of contemporary society, institutions and everyday life. The module focuses, particularly, on interactionist studies and theory as they connect with different theoretical and methodological approaches from sociology, anthropology, and human geography (among others). We discuss, throughout the module, some of the classic and contemporary concerns of the social sciences. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0933
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will provide a detailed overview of the study of crime and criminal justice by incorporating theoretical and policy issues relevant to gender, race, class and sexual orientation.  The module is intended for students seeking to gain knowledge of criminology, policing, prosecution and the courts, and the sanctioning of offenders.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0933
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module will provide a detailed overview of the study of crime and criminal justice by incorporating theoretical and policy issues relevant to gender, race, class and sexual orientation.  The module is intended for students seeking to gain knowledge of criminology, policing, prosecution and the courts, and the sanctioning of offenders.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0934
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10
  • To provide students with a detailed overview of the development of state responses to crime.
  • To consider how penal responses have evolved in contemporary society, paying particular attention to imprisonment and probation practices; issues of reparation, reconciliation, re-integration and re-education; and specific areas of penal practice in how to deal with offenders ‘through the prison gate’ and after conviction;
  • To equip students with an understanding of the challenges involved in turning policy into practice;
  • To consider what the state responses to crime are likely to achieve, in light of what we already know “works”.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0934
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10
  • To provide students with a detailed overview of the development of state responses to crime.
  • To consider how penal responses have evolved in contemporary society, paying particular attention to imprisonment and probation practices; issues of reparation, reconciliation, re-integration and re-education; and specific areas of penal practice in how to deal with offenders ‘through the prison gate’ and after conviction;
  • To equip students with an understanding of the challenges involved in turning policy into practice;
  • To consider what the state responses to crime are likely to achieve, in light of what we already know “works”.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0935
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10
  • To develop knowledge of contemporary approaches and issues in respect of public policy
  • To develop understanding of the relations between politics, governance and public policy

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0937
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10
  • To develop a wide ranging and critical understanding of equality and diversity issues within a variety of learning contexts (both compulsory and post-compulsory).
  • To draw on a range of critical perspectives to explore the interconnections between gender, race, class, disability, sexuality and educational, training and workplace based learning experiences and outcomes.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0937
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10
  • To develop a wide ranging and critical understanding of equality and diversity issues within a variety of learning contexts (both compulsory and post-compulsory).
  • To draw on a range of critical perspectives to explore the interconnections between gender, race, class, disability, sexuality and educational, training and workplace based learning experiences and outcomes.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0939
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module aims to foster a critical understanding of the variety of psychological perspectives from which individualities are investigated. These include psychodynamic and psychometric theories of personality and motivation, as well as psychodynamic, dialogical, narrative and social-constructionist perspectives on the self and identity construction in contexts of modernity and social change.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0941
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module aims to provide students with a good understanding of sociological approaches to the study of education, drawing on a range of scales and contexts. It explores ‘big ideas’ in the sociology of education, such as inequality, power, and identity and helps students to apply them to contemporary educational issues and debates.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0941
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module aims to provide students with a good understanding of sociological approaches to the study of education, drawing on a range of scales and contexts. It explores ‘big ideas’ in the sociology of education, such as inequality, power, and identity and helps students to apply them to contemporary educational issues and debates.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0942
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module aims to introduce students to debates in the sociology of migration, ‘race’ and ethnicity. It examines competing theoretical explanations of race and ethnicity, international migration and the ways in which race and ethnic relations are constructed. It also examines the social, political and historical conditions under which racial and ethnic hierarchies emerge and reproduce over time and why they continue to be central to the organization of contemporary societies. The focus is primarily on the experiences of ethnic minorities in Britain, but we will also draw on debates and materials in other immigrant destinations, especially the USA.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0942
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module aims to introduce students to debates in the sociology of migration, ‘race’ and ethnicity. It examines competing theoretical explanations of race and ethnicity, international migration and the ways in which race and ethnic relations are constructed. It also examines the social, political and historical conditions under which racial and ethnic hierarchies emerge and reproduce over time and why they continue to be central to the organization of contemporary societies. The focus is primarily on the experiences of ethnic minorities in Britain, but we will also draw on debates and materials in other immigrant destinations, especially the USA.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0945
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The module is in the specialist field of medical sociology and the sociology of health and illness.  It presents the key sociological ideas about professional medicine and its power as a social institution; addresses the concerns of modern life as they are lived through the everyday experiences of health and illness; explores the expansion of medicine into personal and collective identities, health practices and bodily concerns; illuminates the forms of exclusion and health inequality that are reproduced at different scales; and critiques the ways in which different ‘ways of life’ are articulated by health experts and policy makers.

This module is divided into four sections:

1.    The rise of professional medicine (professions and practice)

2.    The organisation of health Care (health care systems and technology) 

3.    The experience of health and illness (patients and people)

4.    The distribution of health, disease and death (populations, politics and policy)

The module uses the four themes to introduce to the students key concepts that are relevant to the sociological study of medicine and health.  Cross cutting themes include power and its distribution, health knowledge of different kinds, and forms of challenge and contestation.   

Students will have opportunities to exercise their understanding of contemporary debates about medicine, illness and disease that exist in the political, policy and public spheres; and to chart these debates through past time and into the future. Much of the student learning is based on the global uncertainties – from a sociological point of view – of medical and health knowledge, political institutions, economic and social life and the demands on community, the body and identity.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0945
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module is in the specialist field of medical sociology and the sociology of health and illness.  It presents the key sociological ideas about professional medicine and its power as a social institution; addresses the concerns of modern life as they are lived through the everyday experiences of health and illness; explores the expansion of medicine into personal and collective identities, health practices and bodily concerns; illuminates the forms of exclusion and health inequality that are reproduced at different scales; and critiques the ways in which different ‘ways of life’ are articulated by health experts and policy makers.

This module is divided into four sections:

1.    The rise of professional medicine (professions and practice)

2.    The organisation of health Care (health care systems and technology) 

3.    The experience of health and illness (patients and people)

4.    The distribution of health, disease and death (populations, politics and policy)

The module uses the four themes to introduce to the students key concepts that are relevant to the sociological study of medicine and health.  Cross cutting themes include power and its distribution, health knowledge of different kinds, and forms of challenge and contestation.   

Students will have opportunities to exercise their understanding of contemporary debates about medicine, illness and disease that exist in the political, policy and public spheres; and to chart these debates through past time and into the future. Much of the student learning is based on the global uncertainties – from a sociological point of view – of medical and health knowledge, political institutions, economic and social life and the demands on community, the body and identity.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0946
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The module aims to provide students with an advanced level of knowledge and understanding of contemporary education and training policy (especially in the UK, but with international comparisons). It will explore the complex and contested nature of education and training policy and how the politics of place reflect and reinforce broader social trends. The module is focused on the analyses of current policy and practice, relating to both the compulsory and non-compulsory phases of education and training, and covers the role of both state and non-state actors in education policy. Analysis of policy within the module explores the general dimensions of contemporary state policy (e.g. marketization and privatisation, public/private sector relations, economic efficiency/social inclusion, individual/collective responsibilities), as well as providing detailed insights into selected policy initiatives (such as, policies on schools, training and skills policy, policies on skills supply and demand, and the expansion of higher education and the so-called knowledge economy).

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0946
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module aims to provide students with an advanced level of knowledge and understanding of contemporary education and training policy (especially in the UK, but with international comparisons). It will explore the complex and contested nature of education and training policy and how the politics of place reflect and reinforce broader social trends. The module is focused on the analyses of current policy and practice, relating to both the compulsory and non-compulsory phases of education and training, and covers the role of both state and non-state actors in education policy. Analysis of policy within the module explores the general dimensions of contemporary state policy (e.g. marketization and privatisation, public/private sector relations, economic efficiency/social inclusion, individual/collective responsibilities), as well as providing detailed insights into selected policy initiatives (such as, policies on schools, training and skills policy, policies on skills supply and demand, and the expansion of higher education and the so-called knowledge economy).

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0948
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will provide a detailed overview of the scholarly study of police and policing, drawing on historical and contemporary developments in theories of policing, policing policy and practice, and academic and applied research on policing.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0948
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module will provide a detailed overview of the scholarly study of police and policing, drawing on historical and contemporary developments in theories of policing, policing policy and practice, and academic and applied research on policing.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0949
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This research-led module examines cutting edge issues in advanced social and cultural psychology. It consists of units representing teaching staff's specialisations. Whilst specific topics may vary from year to year, the module's aim is to facilitate in depth engagement with important debates in the social and human sciences. Students explore research traditions within social and cultural psychology critically and in-depth. The module aims to introduce cutting edge debates and issues in social and cultural psychology within a social science context; and explore contrasting traditions and methodological positions in critical social psychological research practice, concerning topics such as discourse, experience, subjectivity, embodiment and visual culture. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0949
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This research-led module examines cutting edge issues in advanced social and cultural psychology. It consists of units representing teaching staff's specialisations. Whilst specific topics may vary from year to year, the module's aim is to facilitate in depth engagement with important debates in the social and human sciences. Students explore research traditions within social and cultural psychology critically and in-depth. The module aims to introduce cutting edge debates and issues in social and cultural psychology within a social science context; and explore contrasting traditions and methodological positions in critical social psychological research practice, concerning topics such as discourse, experience, subjectivity, embodiment and visual culture. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0950
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module is designed to introduce students to a range of issues around the role of science and technology in democratic societies, with a particular focus on the use of scientific and other expert advice in policy-making and the consequences of this for social science theory and practice.

The module begins by examining the role of science in contemporary society and the different ways in which this has been understood within sociology. This includes ideas such as the ‘risk society’ as well as more recent debates about the social construction of science and technology. In addition to exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different theoretical approaches, this part of the module will examine the practical implications of these theories for topics including scientific advice, the role of media and the challenges of science communication.

The second part of the module turns the examines how these new understandings of scientific work challenge practices within both social and natural sciences. The topics covered will include the understanding of risk – particularly risks associated with science and technology – and how these provoke new ways of thinking about the relationships between citizens and the institutions of the state that seek to regulate their behaviour.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0950
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module is designed to introduce students to a range of issues around the role of science and technology in democratic societies, with a particular focus on the use of scientific and other expert advice in policy-making and the consequences of this for social science theory and practice.

The module begins by examining the role of science in contemporary society and the different ways in which this has been understood within sociology. This includes ideas such as the ‘risk society’ as well as more recent debates about the social construction of science and technology. In addition to exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different theoretical approaches, this part of the module will examine the practical implications of these theories for topics including scientific advice, the role of media and the challenges of science communication.

The second part of the module turns the examines how these new understandings of scientific work challenge practices within both social and natural sciences. The topics covered will include the understanding of risk – particularly risks associated with science and technology – and how these provoke new ways of thinking about the relationships between citizens and the institutions of the state that seek to regulate their behaviour.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0951
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

A module in Digital Society: Theory, Method and Data offers an introduction to relevant sociological theories and methods for understanding the emerging contours of digital society. It also provides formal training in research methods and techniques to understand, analyse and make sense of big data with a particular focus on public social media, while exploring the opportunities that digital data offer for social science research more broadly. The course combines training in sociological thinking and research methods with the use of computational tools.

 

This module is contextualized in terms of the ‘coming crisis of empirical sociology’ (Savage and Burrows, 2007), which is located in the increasing asymmetry between traditional social scientific methods and the power of transactional data generated through the internet. This has led some commentators to question the extent to which university-based sociology and social science can compete with the data rich resources built into the marketing and data generation strategies of the large multi-national corporations that hold and marshal much of this transactional data.

 

Big Social Data, generated in large part by Social Media interactions, are distinctive from corporate transactional data and ‘conventional’ social science data as they are naturally occurring or ‘user-generated’ and are largely accessible by researchers.   Digital social research tools hold the potential to capture Digital Social Data at the level of populations in real/near-real-time. This offers students the hitherto unrealizable possibility of studying social processes as they unfold as contrasted with their official construction through the use of ‘terrestrial’ research instruments (survey, interviews etc.) and curated and administrative data-sets. The potential for systematic data mining and mixed method analysis in relation to key social science concerns and questions is now possible. The module provides an introduction for undergraduate students to digital social sciences and digital sociology. It also provides a means of augmenting social science research training through the provision of new methodological tools and options for researchers conducting social inquiry in the 21st century.  

 

ln construction through the use of ‘terrestrial’ research instruments (survey, interviews etc.) and curated and administrative data-sets. The potential for systematic data mining and mixed method analysis in relation to key social science concerns and questions is now possible; COSMOS provides a means for undergraduate students to operationalise a next generation ‘social computational tool kit’. It also provides a means of augmenting social science research training through the provision of new methodological tools and options for researchers conducting social inquiry in the 21st century.  This process is informed by COSMOS’s recent work on the political and ethical implications of Big Data that focuses on the tensions between the ‘panoptic’ and ‘synoptic’ powers of digital observatories and the allied possibilities of a ‘signature science’.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0951
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

A module in Digital Society: Theory, Method and Data offers an introduction to relevant sociological theories and methods for understanding the emerging contours of digital society. It also provides formal training in research methods and techniques to understand, analyse and make sense of big data with a particular focus on public social media, while exploring the opportunities that digital data offer for social science research more broadly. The course combines training in sociological thinking and research methods with the use of computational tools.

 

This module is contextualized in terms of the ‘coming crisis of empirical sociology’ (Savage and Burrows, 2007), which is located in the increasing asymmetry between traditional social scientific methods and the power of transactional data generated through the internet. This has led some commentators to question the extent to which university-based sociology and social science can compete with the data rich resources built into the marketing and data generation strategies of the large multi-national corporations that hold and marshal much of this transactional data.

 

Big Social Data, generated in large part by Social Media interactions, are distinctive from corporate transactional data and ‘conventional’ social science data as they are naturally occurring or ‘user-generated’ and are largely accessible by researchers.   Digital social research tools hold the potential to capture Digital Social Data at the level of populations in real/near-real-time. This offers students the hitherto unrealizable possibility of studying social processes as they unfold as contrasted with their official construction through the use of ‘terrestrial’ research instruments (survey, interviews etc.) and curated and administrative data-sets. The potential for systematic data mining and mixed method analysis in relation to key social science concerns and questions is now possible. The module provides an introduction for undergraduate students to digital social sciences and digital sociology. It also provides a means of augmenting social science research training through the provision of new methodological tools and options for researchers conducting social inquiry in the 21st century.  

 

ln construction through the use of ‘terrestrial’ research instruments (survey, interviews etc.) and curated and administrative data-sets. The potential for systematic data mining and mixed method analysis in relation to key social science concerns and questions is now possible; COSMOS provides a means for undergraduate students to operationalise a next generation ‘social computational tool kit’. It also provides a means of augmenting social science research training through the provision of new methodological tools and options for researchers conducting social inquiry in the 21st century.  This process is informed by COSMOS’s recent work on the political and ethical implications of Big Data that focuses on the tensions between the ‘panoptic’ and ‘synoptic’ powers of digital observatories and the allied possibilities of a ‘signature science’.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0952
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To provide students with an understanding of the different approaches to conceptualise and measure poverty, the structure of the social security system in the UK today and its purposes and aims, recent reforms to social security and their impact on poverty, and a number of challenges relating to poverty and anti-poverty efforts in the United Kingdom.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSI0952
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

To provide students with an understanding of the different approaches to conceptualise and measure poverty, the structure of the social security system in the UK today and its purposes and aims, recent reforms to social security and their impact on poverty, and a number of challenges relating to poverty and anti-poverty efforts in the United Kingdom.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%