Psychology

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of Psychology.

Module codePS1014
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The purpose of the module is to familiarise students with the scientific approach to the study of human behaviour and cognition.

Through example-based learning, students will be introduced to the principles of research design within the field of psychology.  Students will also learn about the application of these methods to the understanding of human behaviour.

Students will learn to distinguish the characteristics of “good” and “bad” science.

Students will also develop a familiarity with modern methods of scientific communication: presentations, journal articles and blogs.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS1016
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20
  • To develop knowledge of the underlying concepts and principles associated with a range of topics in psychology. To develop students’ appreciation and understanding of the wide variety of experimental techniques used in psychological research.
  • To develop students’ appreciation of how the disparate fields within psychology are linked in an understanding of behaviour.
  • To develop knowledge of how laboratory and field research is linked to applied uses of psychology.
  • The course aims to develop a students’ knowledge of the field of psychology, with specific emphasis on the role of experimental methodologies in developing the scientific approach to the study of behaviour.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS1018
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20
  • To develop students’ knowledge of underlying concepts and principles associated with experimental psychology and develop their ability to evaluate and interpret these within the context of psychological research.
  • To gain sufficient knowledge to be able to investigate research questions using the most appropriate statistical design and analytic techniques and to interpret qualitative and quantitative data.
  • To develop sufficient expertise and understanding of experimental methodology in order to develop lines of argument in accordance with basic theories to successfully engage in the preparation and production of practicals.
  • To acquire sufficient expertise in the use of statistical software, graphing packages, display packages.
  • To gain experience conducting simple experiments in psychology, analysing data and writing laboratory reports.

Students will be introduced to the conceptual underpinnings of statistical principles in a developmental sequence so as to help promote students’ overall understanding of the role of statistics, research methods and computing applications within psychology. Students will be introduced to the following topics

(1) data distributions

(2) descriptive statistics

(3) probability

(4) simple inferential statistics

(5) parametric vs. non-parametric statistics

(6) introduction to hypothesis testing

(7) principles of research design

(8) computing of statistics via software (SPSS)

(9) Conducting and reporting experiments in psychology.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 0%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 15%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 30%
  • Written assessment: 7%
  • Written assessment: 8%
Module codePS2007
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

To build upon the basic understanding of underlying concepts and principles associated with social psychology introduced in Year 1. This module will develop the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of well established principles of social psychology and their ability to evaluate critically the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems in this field.

To develop students’ critical understanding of human information-processing in its social context (including memory, inference and judgement), and the extent to which social cognitions mediate social behaviour.

To develop the students’ critical understanding of well established principles of development, maintenance and change in human personal relationships and the way social cognition functions in this context.

To develop students’ critical understanding of the extent to which performance is affected by the imagined and actual presence of other people, and how our cognition and behaviour is affected by our own and others’ social group memberships.

To develop students’ critical understanding of research methods, questions and hypotheses in social psychology.

To develop the students critical appreciation of different methods and their appropriateness in solving problems in social psychology.

To develop students' abilities to appraise critically published research in social psychology. 

To develop new competencies in the design and conduct of an empirical study, the analysis of data and the interpretation of findings, building on the learning outcomes achieved in Year 1.

This social psychology module develops the students’ critical understanding of well established intra-personal, interpersonal, intra-group, and intergroup phenomena and the role of psychological processes therein. Attention is paid to the testing of theory, developing a critical understanding of the historical and cross-cultural perspectives, the strengths and weaknesses of established techniques and limitations of existing knowledge in the conduct of experimental research in social psychology.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2011
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Students will acquire knowledge and critical understanding of cognitive and social development from conception through adolescence, including theories, methodological issues, and what is known about early cognition and cognitive growth; language and memory development; intelligence; emotional and social development; and family and peer relations. Lectures include video presentation of key paradigms in developmental psychology. The students will undertake a practical that extends their range of skills, including analyses of longitudinal research, observational methods, etc. These skills are particularly helpful for students who aspire to careers in education or educational psychology, child clinical psychology and other professions that entail working with children and their families. The module features research-led teaching, not only in terms of lecture content but also drawing on research groups and laboratory resources to deliver practicals that provide students with practice in key research skills.

The module aims:

  • To provide students with knowledge and critical understanding of developmental research methods in the investigation of psychological changes with age.
  • To provide students with a critical understanding of theories of development change and continuity in infancy, childhood & adolescence.
  • To provide students with knowledge of well established research evidence that forms a basis for an understanding of psychological development.
  • To provide students with an understanding of how the study of developmental disorders informs us about general developmental processes
  • To provide students with a critical understanding of recent research and scholarship in selected core topics in developmental psychology.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2016
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

To provide students with an introduction to:

  • The historical background of social psychology, its links with other social and behavioural sciences, and its complementary relationship to other branches of psychology (e.g., cognitive, developmental).
  • Some of the most influential theories and studies in social psychology.
  • Some of the ways in which social psychology has been applied to produce a better understanding of ‘real world’ problems.

This module introduces some of the main theories and methods of social psychology. The module also considers various applications of social psychology. The teaching delivery stresses the relationship of learning and teaching with research.
 

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2017
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

To build upon the basic understanding of concepts and principles associated with biological psychology introduced in level 4. This module will develop the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of well established principles of animal learning, and the neural basis of cognition, genes and action selection.

To evaluate theories of the well-established principles of learning and memory in animals.
To develop critical understanding and knowledge of the objectives, methods and current limitations of the biological approach to psychology.
To develop current knowledge and critical understanding of the relationship between brain function, genes, behaviour and cognitive disorders.
To consider research and scholarship in selected core topics in biological psychology.

This module will develop the students’ understanding and critical appreciation of current ideas concerning the relationship between brain function, genes and behaviour. The module will develop critical understanding of psychological principles of animal learning and brain function - at both the level of single neurons, neuronal systems, genes and functional anatomical circuits. A consideration of well-established phenomena relating to learning, memory, feeding and higher cognitive control and action selection will be used to highlight different aspects of brain function in health and disease.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2018
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

To build upon the basic understanding of concepts and principles associated with abnormal and clinical psychology introduced in Level 4.
To develop knowledge and critical understanding of well-established principles of abnormal and clinical psychology and individual differences.
To develop a critical understanding of conceptual and methodological issues in the field of abnormal and clinical psychology.
To develop critical appreciation of contemporary views about the origins of a range of psychological disorders.
To examine biological, psychological and social perspectives on the aetiology of a range of psychological disorders.
To develop an understanding of the clinical approach to assessment and treatment for disorders of mental health.

This module will introduce students to a variety of perspectives on abnormal and clinical psychology, such as: what is 'abnormal behaviour', how diagnoses and assessments are made, the role of genetics, environment and their interactions on aetiology, how different mental health disorders are treated, and the controversy surrounding some diagnoses. These issues will be expolored by special attention to conditions such as eating disorders, schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety, PTSD, OCD, personality disorders, autism, ADHD and neurodegenerative disorders.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2020
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

To build upon the basic understanding of concepts and principles associated with cognitive psychology introduced in level 4. This module will develop the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of two core topics in cognitive psychology – language and memory.

To develop students’ critical understanding of research methods and the appropriateness of different approaches, techniques, and problems in the investigation of human information processing in relation to language and memory.
To provide students with knowledge of research evidence that forms a basis for an understanding of language and memory.
To provide students with knowledge and critical understanding of recent research and scholarship in language and memory.
To provide students with knowledge and understanding of neuroscientific aspects of memory and language.

This course will develop students’ critical understanding of information processing and neuroscientific approaches, concepts and theories in the study of: human memory, including sensory and short-term visual and auditory memory systems, retrieval and recognition. The psychology of language study will include speech perception, word recognition, language development, normal and impaired language processing, language and the brain, the time course of language production, syntactic structure in language, pragmatics; concepts and categories, prototype and exemplar-based theories.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2021
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20
  • To develop the students knowledge and critical understanding of major issues and themes of contemporary research and thinking on visual and auditory perception and cross-modal interaction between senses, and how they relate to issues of attention and action.
  • To develop students’ critical appreciation of the experimental techniques of sensory research with special regard to stimulus generation and control, the role of cognitive representation, and the computational modelling of psychological functions.
  • To develop students’ ability to critically appraise the relationships between psychology and physiology, and psychology and the computational metaphor.
  • To elaborate on the formulation of research questions and hypotheses, the design and conduct of an empirical study, the analysis of data and the interpretation of findings, building on the learning outcomes achieved at Level 4.
  • The course focuses on the way humans (with reference to other species) interact with and extract information about the world through their sensory organs and represent the current state of the world. Such issues as colour, depth, the effects of brain damage, sound localisation and masking are considered.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2023
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The module aimso introduce the processes by which humans evaluate various sources of information, including emotion, in order to arrive at an understanding of things and events in their environment and to make judgments and decisions about those things and events. The course also examines the neural correlates of such processes and how they may be implemented computationally.

To develop students’ critical understanding of key theoretical and empirical literature on the cognitive psychology of judgment, decision-making, and the role of emotion in cognition.

To develop their understanding of methods and findings relating to the neural correlates of judgment, decision-making and consciousness.

To develop their understanding of the importance of computational concepts and models of human cognition. 

To further develop their critical understanding of the formulation of research questions and hypotheses, the design and conduct of an empirical study, the analysis of data and the interpretation of empirical findings.

The module will cover the study how people make judgments under uncertainty and how they evaluate evidence in arriving at decisions. The role that emotion plays in human thought will be discussed as will the neural correlates of higher cognition and consciousness. Basic computational issues of representation and process will be discussed throughout the course. Aspects of how cognitive processes manifest in applied settings will also be addressed.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codePS2024
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

To build upon the sound understanding of concepts and principles associated with experimental psychology introduced in Level 4. This module will develop the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of well established principles of research design, statistics and computing in psychology.

To develop students’ understanding and critical appreciation of well established principles and methods of statistical applications and qualitative/quantitative analysis in psychology introduced at Level 4. 

To develop a sound understanding of the use of statistical and analytical techniques.

To develop further the students’ expertise and critical understanding of methods in experimental design and statistics analysis and their application in a broader context.

To acquire expertise in the use of statistical software.

To develop students’ critical understanding of the principles and methods of well established statistical applications in psychology. The principle analyses learnt will be: analysis of variance, post hoc testing, simple linear and multiple regression analysis, factor analysis, meta-analysis and qualitative/quantitative analysis.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 85%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 5%
Module codePS3000
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits40

To design, carry out, and report an extended research project.

In this double semester module, students work individually and with appropriate supervision on a topic agreed with and approved by their supervisor. They are required to formulate a specific problem in psychology, design and carry out an appropriate research project, present and analyse their findings, and discuss the work critically. They are required to present their work in a report of not more than 7000 words which meets appropriate professional requirements. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codePS3115
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To develop students’ critical understanding of key concepts at the forefront of health psychology, specifically stress and disease.

To develop the students’ systematic understanding and detailed knowledge of current research conducted within the field of health psychology, specifically stress and disease. 

The course comprises a series of lectures in which the relationship between stress (both physical and psychological) and health will be explored. The interaction between the physiological stress response system and, for example, the cardiovascular system will be discussed. The relationship between, for example, traits, emotions, coping processes and disease onset and prognosis will be examined in detail. 

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 100%
Module codePS3116
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10
  • To introduce students to forensic psychology, with particular regard to violent and antisocial behaviour
  • To provide students with evidence-based approaches to the understanding of criminal behaviours.
  • To enable students to evaluate empirical findings in relation to offender assessment and management. 

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 100%
Module codePS3201
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The aim of the module is to develop the students’ critical understanding of key findings and theoretical issues and concepts that have been derived from research into learning, cognition and affect in animals.

The course will examine the main principles and experimental findings that have emerged from a century of research into animal intelligence. Part of the course will be concerned with associative learning, where particular emphasis will be placed on the theoretical analysis of both Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. The other part will concern animal cognition and will include consideration of such topics as categorisation, the representation of knowledge, social learning, and theory of mind.
 

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 100%
Module codePS3202
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Students will develop a systematic understanding of key findings and theoretical issues related to how the brain processes and stores information.

The course will examine the main principles and experimental findings concerning the biological substrates of learning and memory. The course will convey our current understanding of the synaptic and systems level basis of simple forms of learning, such as habituation, and more complex forms of memory, such as episodic memory. This work will be discussed in the context of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 100%
Module codePS3208
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module will develop the students’ systematic understanding of semantic and episodic memory processes, spanning cognitive accounts and theories of how the brain supports these kinds of memory. Students will develop a critical appreciation of how data from different species is relevant to questions about human episodic and semantic memory, as well as how data acquired using different measurement techniques can provide complementary insights into human memory and how the brain supports human memory. Key conceptual issues that will be addressed are:

The nature and variety of organic brain disorders that impair learning and memory, in particular amnesia and the dementias.

The ways in which brain imaging studies of memory can complement studies in patients as well as in animals with selective brain damage.

The reasons why there are benefits from an integrative approach to human and experimental animal research on studies of memory and related aspects of cognition.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 100%
Module codePS3210
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module will address the extent to which contemporary genetic, genomic and neuroscience approaches have informed our understanding about the biological basis of behaviour in health and disease. Key issues for discussion will include; the nature of the evidence that genes can influence psychology and behaviour; how the new genetics is beginning to shed light on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric brain disorders; the emerging field of epigenetics and its relevance to brain development, gene/environment interplay and the trans-generational inheritance of acquired characteristics; whether and how biological sex can impact on behaviour and the medical, ethical, social and legal challenges we face in the post-genomic world.       

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 100%
Module codePS3312
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

To introduce students to the scientific study of judgment and decision making with respect to descriptive and normative perspectives, as well as how decision outcomes can be optimized given these constraints.

The course will review the main processes underlying human judgment decision making. In particular, it will address theories and experimental findings related to the cognitive, social, and neural underpinnings of choice and judgment. Building on these foundations, it will then examine how psychologists can act as ‘choice architects’ to improve practical and applied decision making processes for individuals as well as groups, societies, and businesses. 

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 0%
Module codePS3316
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To systematically examine the interaction between visual perception and activity.

To evaluate the perceptual problems faced by an active observer and how vision guides action.

To develop a critical appreciation of current models, experimental findings and application of vision science with regard to vision and action.

To appreciate the value of mathematical relationships in describing perceptual processes.

To set these ideas within the context of broader themes within vision science and action control.

To discuss various approaches and methods used to investigate these ideas, drawing on topics in neurophysiology, psychophysics and psychology.

This module will develop the students’ systematic understanding of the interaction between vision and motor control, highlighting sensorimotor control mechanisms, problems faced by an active observer, how the visual system resolves these problems and how perception supports action.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 100%
Module codePS3317
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module addresses processes involved in the production, perception and comprehension of speech and language from both classical and contemporary perspectives. It focusses on the nature of the information contained within written and spoken language and the psychological processes that are involved in enabling this information to serve its communicative function. 

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 100%
Module codePS3414
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Students will be introduced to recent theoretical and methodological advances relating to the genetic, biological and social underpinnings of childhood and adolescent development.

AIMS OF THE MODULE

To introduce students to recent theoretical and methodological advances relating to the genetic, biological and social underpinnings of childhood and adolescent psychopathology.

To introduce students to the methodological challenges underlying the study of normal and abnormal psychological development from genetic, biological and social developmental research traditions as well as the challenges inherent to integrating these perspectives in the study of developmental psychopathology across childhood and adolescence.  

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 100%
Module codePS3415
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

In this module the students will develop a systematic understanding of the historical, theoretical, and methodological foundations of the interdisciplinary and applied field of environmental psychology. Students will develop a critical understanding of the application of psychology theory and research to environmental issues and human-environment interactions. Topics covered include environmental attitudes and behaviour, environmental risk perception, environmental stressors, architecture and urban environments. Lectures will describe theories, empirical evidence, case studies and methods relevant to these topics.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 100%
Module codePS3416
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This course will provide students with an understanding of social and neuroscience perspectives on emotion, and how they might be integrated. The first half of the course will focus on the social functions and communication of emotions. The second half will focus on the neuroscience of emotion and communication of emotions, including brain imaging (fMRI, EEG) and patient-based neuropsychological approaches to understanding the neural underpinnings of emotions and their intra-individual and social functions.
The module will introduce students to: The social functions of the emotions; The communication and expression of the emotions; The influence of culture on emotion; The theoretical and methodological underpinnings of social neuroscience; the ways in which brain imaging and patient-based neuropsychological studies can inform knowledge of the functions of emotion and theories of emotion; the neuroscience of ‘basic’ emotions and emotion communication and understanding; the neuroscience of social emotions.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 100%
Module codePS3419
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module addresses key aspects of research in contemporary developmental psychology, looking at methods commonly used in basic research as well as the application of those methods to assessment and intervention.

The module will consider the full scope of research in developmental psychology, including how to use the existing literature to inform new research, policy and practice; how to choose appropriate tools for measurement and assessment; how to manage, analyse, and understand data; and how to identify causal and risk factors in development.

The module will cover a range of research methods including questionnaires and checklists; observation and interviews; qualitative design and analysis; and interventions and randomised controlled trials (RCTs). 

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 100%