Politics

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the Department of Politics and International Relations.

Module codePL9223
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The increasing centrality of digital technologies in global politics is raising questions beyond the technical. Issues such as cyber-security, Internet governance, and online human rights are challenging traditional concepts in International Relations. While other disciplines like law, sociology and computer science have engaged closely with the Information Age, international relations scholars have yet to bring the full analytic power of their discipline to developing our understanding of what digital technologies mean for concepts like war, peace, security, cooperation, human rights, equity and power.

The module consists of four sections, each of which builds on the previous one to help students develop a broad overview of the key debates that are animating the nascent scholarship on digital technologies and global politics. Teaching will also include five evenly spaced seminars in which students will work in small groups to develop the themes taken up in lectures. Assessment for the module will be one essay midway through the semester followed by a final exam.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codePL9223
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The increasing centrality of digital technologies in global politics is raising questions beyond the technical. Issues such as cyber-security, Internet governance, and online human rights are challenging traditional concepts in International Relations. While other disciplines like law, sociology and computer science have engaged closely with the Information Age, international relations scholars have yet to bring the full analytic power of their discipline to developing our understanding of what digital technologies mean for concepts like war, peace, security, cooperation, human rights, equity and power.

The module consists of four sections, each of which builds on the previous one to help students develop a broad overview of the key debates that are animating the nascent scholarship on digital technologies and global politics. Teaching will also include five evenly spaced seminars in which students will work in small groups to develop the themes taken up in lectures. Assessment for the module will be one essay midway through the semester followed by a final exam.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codePL9292
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Nearly 20 million people worldwide die poverty-related deaths every year. In response, cosmopolitanism argues that our duties of justice are global rather than limited by state borders or by the special relationships that we share with fellow citizens. The implication of this position is that all of us, and the states that represent us, are under obligations to act in the face of this global poverty and suffering. These obligations may require international aid or even the remaking of the global economic order. This module will examine central liberal cosmopolitan arguments in justification of these claims. It will also focus on critical engagements with cosmopolitanism from both their fellow liberals and from non-liberals. This tension between local and global political obligations can also be central to thinking about the state’s use of force in war and in humanitarian intervention and this module will introduce students to contemporary thinking about this.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
Module codePL9292
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Nearly 20 million people worldwide die poverty-related deaths every year. In response, cosmopolitanism argues that our duties of justice are global rather than limited by state borders or by the special relationships that we share with fellow citizens. The implication of this position is that all of us, and the states that represent us, are under obligations to act in the face of this global poverty and suffering. These obligations may require international aid or even the remaking of the global economic order. This module will examine central liberal cosmopolitan arguments in justification of these claims. It will also focus on critical engagements with cosmopolitanism from both their fellow liberals and from non-liberals. This tension between local and global political obligations can also be central to thinking about the state’s use of force in war and in humanitarian intervention and this module will introduce students to contemporary thinking about this.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
Module codePL9294
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This is a text-based module intended to provide students with a deep knowledge of a small number of major early modern thinkers, starting with Niccolo Machiavelli.  The module focuses more on depth than on breadth, in order to encourage sustained engagement with a relatively small number of difficult texts and their ideas about politics.  Important political concepts such as liberty, equality, the ends of politics and human nature are all examined in these texts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 40%
Module codePL9294
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This is a text-based module intended to provide students with a deep knowledge of a small number of major early modern thinkers, starting with Niccolo Machiavelli.  The module focuses more on depth than on breadth, in order to encourage sustained engagement with a relatively small number of difficult texts and their ideas about politics.  Important political concepts such as liberty, equality, the ends of politics and human nature are all examined in these texts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 40%
Module codePL9320
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This course aims to provide students with an interdisciplinary understanding of international nuclear politics from the advent of the atomic bomb project in 1941 to the present day. It covers the history of nuclear politics during the Cold War, theoretical debates about deterrence, proliferation, and nuclear governance, and contemporary attempts to address the nuclear dilemma. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 60%
Module codePL9320
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This course aims to provide students with an interdisciplinary understanding of international nuclear politics from the advent of the atomic bomb project in 1941 to the present day. It covers the history of nuclear politics during the Cold War, theoretical debates about deterrence, proliferation, and nuclear governance, and contemporary attempts to address the nuclear dilemma. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 60%
Module codePL9321
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this course is to explore African modes of and contributions to international thought and practice. These contributions necessarily centre around, though are not limited to, the experiences of colonialism, anticolonial struggle and the postcolonial condition. Colonialism and imperialism were among the most significant forms and experiences of international relations over the past few centuries. African thought and practice thus provides a rich and important source of insight and critique, albeit often overlooked by many disciplinary imaginations.

The course will address some of the central problems and modes of critique which have been articulated as a result of African experiences of and struggles against colonialism and its legacies. These include problems of race and culture and their role in colonial oppression and anticolonial struggle; the question of the nation and the idea of pan-Africanism; and political articulation and critique in the realm of music and film. We will engage with the thought and practice of figures such as WEB Du Bois, Leopold Senghor, Kwame Nkrumah, Frantz Fanon, Amílcar Cabral, Achille Mbembe, Ousmane Sembène, Djibril Diop Mambety and others. Our final session will explore the long-standing relationships of political practice, identity and belonging in and between Wales and Africa.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codePL9321
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this course is to explore African modes of and contributions to international thought and practice. These contributions necessarily centre around, though are not limited to, the experiences of colonialism, anticolonial struggle and the postcolonial condition. Colonialism and imperialism were among the most significant forms and experiences of international relations over the past few centuries. African thought and practice thus provides a rich and important source of insight and critique, albeit often overlooked by many disciplinary imaginations.

The course will address some of the central problems and modes of critique which have been articulated as a result of African experiences of and struggles against colonialism and its legacies. These include problems of race and culture and their role in colonial oppression and anticolonial struggle; the question of the nation and the idea of pan-Africanism; and political articulation and critique in the realm of music and film. We will engage with the thought and practice of figures such as WEB Du Bois, Leopold Senghor, Kwame Nkrumah, Frantz Fanon, Amílcar Cabral, Achille Mbembe, Ousmane Sembène, Djibril Diop Mambety and others. Our final session will explore the long-standing relationships of political practice, identity and belonging in and between Wales and Africa.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codePL9322
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module focuses on the problematisation of global environmental issues, identifying the multiple actors, activities and arenas in which international environmental problems are rendered ‘meaningful’ and ‘treatable.’ The module aims to introduce key ideas and approaches in global environmental politics, and to provide a forum in which students can explore how and by whom international environmental issues are governed in today’s world. This forum will include active role play of intergovernmental meetings and negotiations, and group discussion and presentations of different issue areas, including climate change, biodiversity loss, ozone depletion and sustainable development. This hands on approach aims to unpack:

  • The social, political and economic causes and constraints in the production and problematisation of environmental degradation;
  • The place of individuals in generating and responding to these issues;
  • The intergovernmental mechanisms established for addressing environmental problems;
  • The practices of science and knowledge informing collective response to the global environmental crisis, particularly climate change;
  • Transnational environmental activity, including that through social movements, non-governmental organisations, and corporate actors.

The module will be organised around five themes of the environmental problematique: The construction and problematisation of environmental degradation; Environmental governance; Environmental security; Civil society and transnational actors; and Critical debates on justice, development and political economy.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Portfolio: 25%
Module codePL9322
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module focuses on the problematisation of global environmental issues, identifying the multiple actors, activities and arenas in which international environmental problems are rendered ‘meaningful’ and ‘treatable.’ The module aims to introduce key ideas and approaches in global environmental politics, and to provide a forum in which students can explore how and by whom international environmental issues are governed in today’s world. This forum will include active role play of intergovernmental meetings and negotiations, and group discussion and presentations of different issue areas, including climate change, biodiversity loss, ozone depletion and sustainable development. This hands on approach aims to unpack:

  • The social, political and economic causes and constraints in the production and problematisation of environmental degradation;
  • The place of individuals in generating and responding to these issues;
  • The intergovernmental mechanisms established for addressing environmental problems;
  • The practices of science and knowledge informing collective response to the global environmental crisis, particularly climate change;
  • Transnational environmental activity, including that through social movements, non-governmental organisations, and corporate actors.

The module will be organised around five themes of the environmental problematique: The construction and problematisation of environmental degradation; Environmental governance; Environmental security; Civil society and transnational actors; and Critical debates on justice, development and political economy.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Portfolio: 25%
Module codePL9325
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to theories of political economy and how these approaches might contribute to understanding political behaviour, the design of democratic institutions and public policy outcomes.

 

The module considers key theoretical and methodological approaches in the study of political economy, applying these principles to a range of empirical applications. These will include an understanding of why outcomes can vary under different voting systems, why certain public policy outcomes are more likely than others in democracies, and how cooperation between individuals can mitigate “the tragedy of the commons”.

In applying tools and concepts from economics to analyse political behaviour and institutions, this module will appeal to students with an interest in politics, economics and the connections between them. It will be particularly valuable to students interested in understanding the formation of political institutions such as legislatures and coalition governments, and why often widely desirable outcomes such as action to tackle climate change are so difficult to achieve.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
Module codePL9325
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to theories of political economy and how these approaches might contribute to understanding political behaviour, the design of democratic institutions and public policy outcomes.

The module considers key theoretical and methodological approaches in the study of political economy, applying these principles to a range of empirical applications. These will include an understanding of why outcomes can vary under different voting systems, why certain public policy outcomes are more likely than others in democracies, and how cooperation between individuals can mitigate “the tragedy of the commons”.

In applying tools and concepts from economics to analyse political behaviour and institutions, this module will appeal to students with an interest in politics, economics and the connections between them. It will be particularly valuable to students interested in understanding the formation of political institutions such as legislatures and coalition governments, and why often widely desirable outcomes such as action to tackle climate change are so difficult to achieve.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
Module codePL9328
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is to explore the ways in which popular culture and world politics are inextricably linked, looking at the interconnection between diverse manifestations of popular culture, and theories and practices of world politics. Students will examine how popular culture is shaped by and reproduces various world politics ideas, relations, practices and identities. They will also study the ways in which popular culture can challenge or redirect trends and dynamics in world politics. Students will be introduced to different approaches to analyzing popular culture and how it is used and consumed transnationally (e.g. feminist, postcolonial, and Marxist theories). They will also be introduced to a variety of methods to study popular culture (e.g. visual, affective, embodied analyses). Students will then critically engage with a range of media and genres of popular culture in relation to world politics concerns (e.g. globalization, (neo)imperialism, nationalism, international conflicts, security, and development). This module will provide students with important interdisciplinary skills to understand and critically analyze global politics.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codePL9328
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is to explore the ways in which popular culture and world politics are inextricably linked, looking at the interconnection between diverse manifestations of popular culture, and theories and practices of world politics. Students will examine how popular culture is shaped by and reproduces various world politics ideas, relations, practices and identities. They will also study the ways in which popular culture can challenge or redirect trends and dynamics in world politics. Students will be introduced to different approaches to analyzing popular culture and how it is used and consumed transnationally (e.g. feminist, postcolonial, and Marxist theories). They will also be introduced to a variety of methods to study popular culture (e.g. visual, affective, embodied analyses). Students will then critically engage with a range of media and genres of popular culture in relation to world politics concerns (e.g. globalization, (neo)imperialism, nationalism, international conflicts, security, and development). This module will provide students with important interdisciplinary skills to understand and critically analyze global politics.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codePL9329
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is to examine the complex ethical and political dimensions of food production, distribution and consumption in contemporary societies through the lens of political theory. Issues related to food are at the forefront of public debate. For example, measures such as taxes on unhealthy foods have elicited a growing debate on whether the state has the right to interfere with people’s eating choices. Furthermore, the increasing dietary pluralism that characterizes contemporary societies has led to a growing demand for the accommodation of the dietary habits of ethnic minorities, which are often grounded in specific religious or cultural worldviews. This has given rise to demands for the toleration and recognition of these habits, for example, in the form of special alterations of menus in school canteens or prisons, or exemptions from existing laws such as those concerning animal slaughtering. Additionally, food advertising and food labelling raise important normative questions concerning freedom of speech. Moreover, the debate on the moral status of nonhuman animals, and on veganism and vegetarianism, continues to be central to the analysis of food ethics and politics. Finally, food policy has important implications for normative debates on global justice.

This module will address these and other related issues concerning the production, distribution and consumption of food in contemporary societies. The module will especially focus on issues of ethics and justice, and aim to relate each of the topics examined to relevant broader debates in political theory, including those on paternalism, multiculturalism, freedom of speech, animal rights, and global justice.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codePL9329
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is to examine the complex ethical and political dimensions of food production, distribution and consumption in contemporary societies through the lens of political theory. Issues related to food are at the forefront of public debate. For example, measures such as taxes on unhealthy foods have elicited a growing debate on whether the state has the right to interfere with people’s eating choices. Furthermore, the increasing dietary pluralism that characterizes contemporary societies has led to a growing demand for the accommodation of the dietary habits of ethnic minorities, which are often grounded in specific religious or cultural worldviews. This has given rise to demands for the toleration and recognition of these habits, for example, in the form of special alterations of menus in school canteens or prisons, or exemptions from existing laws such as those concerning animal slaughtering. Additionally, food advertising and food labelling raise important normative questions concerning freedom of speech. Moreover, the debate on the moral status of nonhuman animals, and on veganism and vegetarianism, continues to be central to the analysis of food ethics and politics. Finally, food policy has important implications for normative debates on global justice.

This module will address these and other related issues concerning the production, distribution and consumption of food in contemporary societies. The module will especially focus on issues of ethics and justice, and aim to relate each of the topics examined to relevant broader debates in political theory, including those on paternalism, multiculturalism, freedom of speech, animal rights, and global justice.

 

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codePL9331
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The outbreak, course and consequences of war have and continue to profoundly shape political, cultural, social and economic practice both internationally and within different states and societies. In this module, you will be encouraged to consider war as a lived human experience rather than as a clearly bounded or exceptional phenomenon. You will examine and debate how war and military force, whether interstate, extrastate or intrastate in form, affects shapes and is shaped by different societies, communities and individuals. The module will ask how war is made possible in and through everyday situations and practices as well as geopolitical ones. It will examine how war and violence make, permeate and alter societal institutions, economic practices, language and cultural expression and it will explore the impact and legacies of war for different societies, communities and individuals through a series of issues and case studies.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codePL9331
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The outbreak, course and consequences of war have and continue to profoundly shape political, cultural, social and economic practice both internationally and within different states and societies. In this module, you will be encouraged to consider war as a lived human experience rather than as a clearly bounded or exceptional phenomenon. You will examine and debate how war and military force, whether interstate, extrastate or intrastate in form, affects shapes and is shaped by different societies, communities and individuals. The module will ask how war is made possible in and through everyday situations and practices as well as geopolitical ones. It will examine how war and violence make, permeate and alter societal institutions, economic practices, language and cultural expression and it will explore the impact and legacies of war for different societies, communities and individuals through a series of issues and case studies.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codePL9332
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Cybersecurity is at the centre of global debates about governance of the digital domain that comprises internet and internet-enabled instruments and applications. Today, the increasing number of connected people generates discussions on how to enhance inclusiveness in decision making processes on digital policies, and how to secure citizens’ digital rights beyond the Global North. In such a fast developing field of international politics we are witnessing an emerging clash between old hegemonic powers and new actors with potentially different digital priorities.

This module addresses cybersecurity from a broad perspective, focusing primarily on diplomatic negotiations over infrastructural and policy strategies. It will give particular attention to how such negotiations affect digital power inequalities and the extent to which they protect online digital rights. In particular, this module will create discussion on how the narrowing of the digital divide and the consequent inclusion of newly connected countries in global negotiations influence global cybersecurity policies. By attending this module, students will develop a deeper understanding of cybersecurity capacity building, and be able to critically reflect on diplomacy strategies aiming at overcoming power inequalities in the broader global internet governance debate.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 70%
Module codePL9332
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Cybersecurity is at the centre of global debates about governance of the digital domain that comprises internet and internet-enabled instruments and applications. Today, the increasing number of connected people generates discussions on how to enhance inclusiveness in decision making processes on digital policies, and how to secure citizens’ digital rights beyond the Global North. In such a fast developing field of international politics we are witnessing an emerging clash between old hegemonic powers and new actors with potentially different digital priorities.

This module addresses cybersecurity from a broad perspective, focusing primarily on diplomatic negotiations over infrastructural and policy strategies. It will give particular attention to how such negotiations affect digital power inequalities and the extent to which they protect online digital rights. In particular, this module will create discussion on how the narrowing of the digital divide and the consequent inclusion of newly connected countries in global negotiations influence global cybersecurity policies. By attending this module, students will develop a deeper understanding of cybersecurity capacity building, and be able to critically reflect on diplomacy strategies aiming at overcoming power inequalities in the broader global internet governance debate.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 70%
Module codePL9388
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module provides a broad introduction to the institutional context of contemporary government and politics in Wales, contextualising Welsh politics within the broader framework of UK and European politics, as well as historically and sociologically.

In addition to the impact of devolution on policy and broader governance, particular attention will be given to discussions over future of Wales’ devolution settlement and the dynamics of partisan competition in Wales.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 60%
Module codePL9388
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module provides a broad introduction to the institutional context of contemporary government and politics in Wales, contextualising Welsh politics within the broader framework of UK and European politics, as well as historically and sociologically.

In addition to the impact of devolution on policy and broader governance, particular attention will be given to discussions over future of Wales’ devolution settlement and the dynamics of partisan competition in Wales.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 60%
Module codePL9390
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This is a text-based module intended to provide students with an introduction to some of the ways in which the human mind has been conceived by European intellectuals in the twentieth century, starting with Sigmund Freud.  The ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Michel Foucault are also examined in detail.  The module is inter-disciplinary.  It begins with some background to the debate about the nature of the human psyche in the late-19th century before focusing on modernism, psychoanalysis, existentialism, feminism and postmodernism.  Some reference is also made to parallel developments in culture that illuminate the ideas studied.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
Module codePL9390
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This is a text-based module intended to provide students with an introduction to some of the ways in which the human mind has been conceived by European intellectuals in the twentieth century, starting with Sigmund Freud.  The ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Michel Foucault are also examined in detail.  The module is inter-disciplinary.  It begins with some background to the debate about the nature of the human psyche in the late-19th century before focusing on modernism, psychoanalysis, existentialism, feminism and postmodernism.  Some reference is also made to parallel developments in culture that illuminate the ideas studied.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
Module codePL9391
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Global International organisations, such as the United Nations and its predecessor, the League of Nations, have been linked with significant events impacting on world politics. The module examines the League of Nations and the United Nations. It covers issues such as, the role of international law and politics in the establishment of the League of Nations and the United Nations, the nature of these global international organisations in the international system, the institutional framework of the United Nations and its crucial role in important areas affecting international society, such as maintenance of international peace and security,  protection of human rights and the environment, international criminal justice, terrorism and disarmament. The module also looks at the shortcomings of the United Nations and current attempts to reform it. Are the reforms far-reaching enough to ensure that the United Nations is effective?

This Module aims to make students understand of the role of global International Organisations in International Relations, using two global international organisations (the League of Nations and the United Nations) as case studies. It identifies the legal, institutional and decision-making framework of these global international organisations and seeks to determine how the framework along with other factors has contributed to the failure, shortcomings and/or success of these organisations.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
Module codePL9391
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Global International organisations, such as the United Nations and its predecessor, the League of Nations, have been linked with significant events impacting on world politics. The module examines the League of Nations and the United Nations. It covers issues such as, the role of international law and politics in the establishment of the League of Nations and the United Nations, the nature of these global international organisations in the international system, the institutional framework of the United Nations and its crucial role in important areas affecting international society, such as maintenance of international peace and security,  protection of human rights and the environment, international criminal justice, terrorism and disarmament. The module also looks at the shortcomings of the United Nations and current attempts to reform it. Are the reforms far-reaching enough to ensure that the United Nations is effective?

This Module aims to make students understand of the role of global International Organisations in International Relations, using two global international organisations (the League of Nations and the United Nations) as case studies. It identifies the legal, institutional and decision-making framework of these global international organisations and seeks to determine how the framework along with other factors has contributed to the failure, shortcomings and/or success of these organisations.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%