Lifelong Learning

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at Cardiff University's Continuing & Professional Education.

Module codeCE1101
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module provides students with a knowledge of the basic principles of European law and places these in a social and economic context wherever possible. It should enable students to make a critical assessment of the law of Europe and the way it works in practice. Relevant directives, regulations and case law of the European Court of Justice will be examined. Where possible relevant comparative material from the USA and other common law countries, as well as the theoretical framework of European law and the justifications for the legal regulation of the areas involved, will be considered. METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 contact hours). METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1.5-hour class test and written work of 1,000 words showing knowledge and understanding of the subject.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE1361
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To provide an introductory understanding of the principles and processes of financial management.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE1361
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

To provide an introductory understanding of the principles and processes of financial management.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE2861
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The course provides a further study of financial statements, planning and control, and other financial management techniques. METHOD OF TEACHING - weekly 2 hour lectures (20 contact hours) METHOD OF ASSESSMENT - continuous assessment - 3 accounting assignments

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE3389
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

A practical, introductory project management course covering all the basics of theory, communications, research methods and planning.

 The aim of the module is to provide students with a practical introduction to project management

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE3389
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

A practical, introductory project management course covering all the basics of theory, communications, research methods and planning.

 The aim of the module is to provide students with a practical introduction to project management

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE3968
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Up until the 20th century, our understanding of human anatomy came largely from dissection. Beginning with a brief history of anatomy, this module examines how the application of x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance and other imaging techniques have allowed us to delve inside the body in different ways, and so develop a more detailed understanding of a variety of body functions and conditions.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4190
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This course discusses the problems posed by diseases that are specifically tropical or ones that stem from deficiencies in water supply and sanitation provision.  The approach adopted is an ecological one and gives particular attention to control through habitat modification and technology transfer. This course discusses diseases that are particularly associated with the Developing World.  Some are transmitted by vectors and may also have animal reservoirs; others stem from food shortages, or from deficiencies in water supply and sanitation provision. The approach adopted is principally an ecological one and discusses the possibilities of control through habitat modification, technology transfer, raised awareness and medical intervention.  

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4600
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To introduce students to the material and literary evidence of ancient Greece in order to understand the nature of Greek religion and to enable them to comprehend  the place of religion in the life, society and culture of ancient Greece

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4613
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This course explores the importance of both leadership and management in the professional world.  Leadership and management theories will be examined alongside case studies exploring real-life challenges facing today's professional leaders.  Your own management and leadership styles will be explored and your responses to different management situations explored.  A very interactive course.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4613
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This course explores the importance of both leadership and management in the professional world.  Leadership and management theories will be examined alongside case studies exploring real-life challenges facing today's professional leaders.  Your own management and leadership styles will be explored and your responses to different management situations explored.  A very interactive course.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4625
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Mentoring is used more and more, supporting individuals achieve their goals in many areas of life. As a mentor the course will develop your ability to establish rapport, develop listening skills and the ability to pick up and respond to issues raised by your mentee. Although highly practical the course will also include theory in order for you to reflect and evaluate mentoring practice.

To identify the components and processes for establishing, monitoring and reviewing an effective mentoring relationship.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4625
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Mentoring is used more and more, supporting individuals achieve their goals in many areas of life. As a mentor the course will develop your ability to establish rapport, develop listening skills and the ability to pick up and respond to issues raised by your mentee. Although highly practical the course will also include theory in order for you to reflect and evaluate mentoring practice.

To identify the components and processes for establishing, monitoring and reviewing an effective mentoring relationship.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4706
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This course intends to examine the nature of myth and how it can be used in historical and cultural studies.  It will consider specific mythic figures as case studies in three areas of mythology; Celtic, Norse and Native American. This aims to provide the student with a broad knowledge of the range of mythic material, the ways it varies in different cultures and in different contexts such as written sources, historical documents and popular culture.  In addition these case studies will enable us to look at different ways in which myth has been defined and what impact this has had on the interpretation of myth as a vehicle for culture and identity. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4927
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Britain is steeped in history; from the footprints of our earliest hominid ancestors to the grand castles of Kings in the Middle Ages these islands are rich in their archaeological traces. This module is designed to provide an introductory outline of the archaeology of Britain from the earliest human occupation to the end of the later Middle Ages and to give you a sequence of the archaeological record which will stand you in good stead in the future if you are going on to do more archaeology module addressing specific themes and periods. The module is designed to a) give you a basic knowledge of the surviving, material culture and sites in Britain from the earliest times to the later Middle Ages, and b) to develop your knowledge if the way archaeologists have interpreted this evidence and tried to set it within wider frameworks of understanding. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4997
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The cultural achievements of the ancient Greeks and Romans have never been surpassed, or perhaps even equalled, in the millennia following their downfall. On this module, we will explore some of the greatest philosophy, poetry and rhetoric that western civilisation has ever produced. A wandering hero kills a one-eyed giant and pays a visit to the underworld; guests at a party take turns defining love; a hypnotised woman decapitates her own son with her bare hands; a man on death row struggles desperately to resolve the problem of evil; and Ovid shares dating tips. Widen your horizons and find out what the ancients did for us.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE4998
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The Renaissance (literally ‘re-birth’) saw the expansion and explosion of European culture in the sixteenth century. Assumptions about the nature and capacities of the human subject were interrogated, taken apart and re-formed by some of the greatest minds in history. On this module, we will look at the exciting innovations of this period: the mastery of perspective and depictions of the human form in the paintings of da Vinci and Holbein; the philosophical daydreams of thinkers like Thomas More and Michel de Montaigne; the poetic experiments of Thomas Wyatt and John Donne; and Shakespeare’s dismantling of the ‘Renaissance man’ in Hamlet. From the god-like philosopher to the handful of dust, learn to see humankind through the searching lens of the Renaissance.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5000
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

We live in an age of communication overload, transmitting and receiving language from all directions throughout every waking hour of our lives. We use words to speak, write, text, email and tweet, we continually express ourselves through gestures and body language, and we adapt our discourse to a wide variety of contexts in thousands of subtle and complex ways. Yet we rarely pause to reflect on how language works - we rarely have the opportunity. This module will introduce students to the idea of language as an object of study, and to some of the big questions involved in such study. What is language? How do children learn language? How did Walt Disney change the way we hear regional accents? And does your cat have important things to say to you? We will investigate these questions and more through a study of familiar, everyday language – the language of magazine articles, Facebook posts, phone conversations and stand-up comedy acts – in order to understand the value and importance of language study in the modern world.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5013
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

To present-day eyes, the beliefs of earlier eras can appear bizarre and absurd; the products of ‘ignorance’ or ‘superstition’.  This is certainly the case for early modern understandings of the human body. Crucially, however, these seemingly irrational ideas were often based on careful study and complex systems of thought.  Indeed, the ways in which people in previous ages thought about the body can tell us a great deal about how they saw the world around them and their own place within it. With that in mind, this course will examine a range of beliefs about the body in Britain from 1500 to 1700. This will include attitudes to healing and medicine, heaven, hell and purgatory, monsters and monstrous births, ghosts and witches, and the use of prophecy. Focussing primarily on England, but drawing on the wider British and European contexts where relevant, we will examine what these so-called ‘aberrations’ can reveal about how ideas of ‘common sense’ and ‘normality’ have changed over time. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5023
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Is greed good? Might lust be a virtue? Are faith, hope and charity for losers? What makes something a virtue or vice? Can we learn to be virtuous, as Aristotle and Aquinas supposed? Or has empirical psychology shown the whole idea of character to be no more than a philosophical pipe dream? Is virtue good because its possessor tends to act well? Or does the true value of acting well lie in the virtue of the actor?

This course will explore the nature of ethical character, virtues and vices in the light of both philosophical theory and psychological research. We will examine what guidance philosophy may offer us in shaping our characters, evaluating those of our fellow citizens and formulating public policy.

No previous knowledge of philosophy will be assumed.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5076
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

 

This course tracks the history of media and news production, enabling a wider understanding of contemporary multi-dimensional news platforms by examining the theories that feature within journalistic practice and scholarship today. As a useful foundation ahead of any specialism within media analysis, it is an essential examination of the scholars, practitioners, institutions, corporations and topics that have shaped the modern landscape of journalism, news-production and their examination. This is driven by real world examples and scholarly research to excite, interest and entertain.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5124
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

You will be introduced to major aspects of the English Legal System including its sources practices and procedures. You will gain a thorough understanding of judicial precedent, statutory interpretation, the Jury system, Tribunals, Law Centres and Legal Aid.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5134
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20
  • To give a broad introduction to political, social and economic developments in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) in the late 1980s and early 1990s
  • To identify and explain different interpretations of the processes leading to the collapse of communism in CEE
  • To explore the legacy of the collapse of communism in CEE for contemporary Europe

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5135
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The module will introduce students to a number of key areas in Welsh public life.  The module begins by exploring how Wales is governed and what devolution means in practice, and will then consider concepts such as democracy and representation, as well as looking at how political parties, the civil service and the voluntary sector contribute to policy-making. The course will also consider how influences outside of Wales shape its governance, looking at factors such as the European Union, the Media and the UK government

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5140
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This course will provide an introduction to the C programming language and its usage. After attending this course a student will have acquired the basic skills in programming in C.  Topics covered in this introductory course include data types, arithmetic operators, comparison operators, use of conditional and iterative control statements, formatting of output, use of functions from the C library, creation of user defined functions, introduction to pointers, introduction to arrays, accessing arrays using both subscripts and pointers, use of standard input/output library functions, use of text files and use of C pre-processor directives.  Assessed work will include the writing of C programs.  No programming experience required

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5141
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

International Relations is an exciting discipline which explores politics in the global and regional arenas. This module introduces students to key concepts of International Relations in their historical context and explores the essential international theories which were developed over the years to understand the international system

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5143
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Topics covered in this course include an introduction to classes and objects, class variables, constructors and functions, overloaded constructors and functions, public and private access to variables and functions, arithmetic operators, simple input and output, comparison operators and the use of conditional and iterative control statements, formatting of output, use of library functions and the creation of user defined functions, introduction to pointers, introduction to arrays, accessing arrays using both subscripts and pointers, using classes containing static functions and static variables,  introduction to inheritance by creating a derived class from a base class, inherited and overridden functions in the derived class, use of the new and delete operators to dynamically allocate and release memory, use of the fstream library functions to access files and use of user defined classes to write object-oriented programs.  No prior knowledge of C++ is required.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5146
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5147
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5148
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

In the earlier versions of the Windows operating system, there was no significant scripting language.  Users could only create simple MS-DOS batch files.  Since version 7 of Windows, a scripting language called PowerShell is available that allows a user to create custom scripts similar to those that have been available in Linux for many years

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5151
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The course provides students with an understanding of digital marketing with a focus on business. Students will examine contemporary strategies and concepts that underpin or contribute to business digital marketing practice. Also, students will focus on the specific digital marketing tools that are available to organisations to communicate with their external and internal audiences

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5151
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The course provides students with an understanding of digital marketing with a focus on business. Students will examine contemporary strategies and concepts that underpin or contribute to business digital marketing practice. Also, students will focus on the specific digital marketing tools that are available to organisations to communicate with their external and internal audiences

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5159
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This course is for musicians who have little or no experience of improvising and wish to give it a go. It looks at a number of different approaches to playing the blues, as well as a number of variations on the blues form, from the '3 chord trick' to more sophisticated structures. Participants will be encouraged to express themselves using a range of well-established strategies in a supportive group environment. Students will be introduced to the repertoire and performing styles of a variety of blues music and will be given ample opportunities to ‘jam’. All instruments and levels are welcome, but a basic level of competency is expected.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5163
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The adventures of King Arthur and the knights and ladies of his Round Table conjure up images of a romantic and heroic past, but what do we know of the events that actually shaped it? Using material drawn from folklore, medieval romance and modern film and fantasy literature, this course will examine why the Arthurian tradition has proved so durable.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5178
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module emphasises a “hands-on” approach to learning computer forensic investigation using open-source forensics tools. The module begins with the fundamental forensic concepts, including file system structures on both Linux and Windows platforms, it then leads on to evidence acquisition, imaging, file recovery and analysis. Also included in the module is instruction on UK Law and report writing.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5194
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This course discusses the history, development and treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain including; Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Schizophrenia. The approach adopted focuses on current research and developments relating to disorders of the brain and pays particular attention to the underlying molecular and genetic factors which are associated with these diseases.  

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5212
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This course extends the basic concepts learnt in Java I and is taught along similar lines. Topics covered include exception handlers using try, catch and finally blocks, introduction to inheritance, interfaces, abstract and final classes, introduction to event handling, the MouseListener interface and the MouseAdapter class, use of the FlowLayout, BorderLayout, GridLayout and GridBagLayout layout managers with both the Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT) and the Swing Toolkit, using dialog windows with applications with more than one frame, adding components to the graphical frame. Assessed work will include the creation of a number of applications with a graphical user interface (GUI).This course extends the basic concepts learnt in Java Programming and is taught along similar lines. Topics covered include arrays, vectors, sorting of data, exception handlers using try, catch and finally blocks, introduction to inheritance, interfaces, abstract and final classes, introduction to event handling, the MouseListener interface and the MouseAdapter class, use of the FlowLayout, BorderLayout, GridLayout and GridBagLayout layout managers to add components to the graphical frame in both the Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT) and the Swing Toolkit. Assessed work will include the creation of a number of applications with a graphical user interface (GUI).

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5217
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

What was the role of the queen in the medieval world? Past generations of historians focused on kings: male rulers and their achievements in politics and war. The role of queens was frequently overlooked. This module will explore the notion of Queenship. Through a series of case-studies, ranging from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries and drawing examples from England, France, and Spain, we will examine the role that queens played in medieval society. Students will be introduced to a vibrant recent scholarship, which reinstates royal women in their rightful position as leaders in the medieval world: as mothers and consorts responsible for the perpetuation of royal lines, but equally importantly as strong political figures, even as rulers in their own right, and as patrons of religion and culture. We will examine medieval queens in the wider context of women of the period, questioning the extent to which we are able to reconstruct their roles using male-dominated written accounts. Students will be introduced to modern approaches to studying Queenship, and explore a wide range of written source material and surviving material culture, to understand the power of the queen in the medieval ‘game of thrones’.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5225
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Bestial heroes and heroic beasts haunt forests and cities in the gothic world. The werewolf may be the most famous, but the gothic imagination creates many fantastic creatures. This module will examine how ancient and modern beliefs in uncanny beings like werewolves, black dogs, and the nightmare have contributed to the popularity of gothic art, literature and culture.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5238
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Under conditions of terror,’ Hannah Arendt writes, ‘most people will comply but some people will not’. Why did some people help Jews escape the Nazis, while most watched their neighbours disappear without protest or actively assisted their slaughter? Why did South Wales miners overcome historic homophobia to march at the head of London Pride?

Were the torturers at Abu Ghraib ‘rotten apples’ or just unlucky enough to be in the wrong place at the wrong time? Is the road to hell really paved with good intentions? What is an intention anyhow?

What makes for a moral mind? What makes some children develop into responsible, compassionate adults, while others turn into self-centred, deceitful manipulators? Is a successful moral education a matter of shaping emotions, teaching principles or developing skills of critical moral reflection?  How do temptations work? Can you genuinely believe you shouldn’t eat another cookie while reaching for the jar? ‘I didn’t mean to eat so many.’ Really? Then who forced your hand? 

Do humans possess the only moral minds on this planet?  Or has evolution perhaps produced nothing but moral hypocrites? Can all adults of ordinary intelligence think morally? What can psychopathology tell us about the nature of human morality?

This module will explore a selection of topics in moral psychology, a discipline at the intersection of ethics, philosophy of mind and psychology. No previous knowledge of philosophy or psychology will be assumed.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5239
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The Russian Revolution of 1917 and the consequent establishment and consolidation of the Soviet Union (USSR) was one of the most significant and momentous developments in the world in the twentieth century. This module examines the circumstances which led to the revolutionary upheavals of 1917, before considering the various factors that shaped the dramatic history of the Soviet Union from its formation through to the end of the Second World War and the onset of the Cold War, by which point the USSR had emerged as a global superpower. Exploring cultural, social and economic history alongside the politics of the Soviet Union, this module encourages students to reflect critically upon the centrality of ideology within Soviet society, particularly with reference to the ‘cult of personality’ established by Stalin. Suitable for those with no previous knowledge of the subject, the module is organised chronologically, drawing out key themes and debates that continue to have a pertinence in the uncertain political circumstances of the twenty-first century. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5250
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The definition of gender and sexuality are incredibly fluid and ever changing. The media role in all this is where these definitions are shaped, represented, and performed. The variety of questions explored by this module range from; do men and women produce different kinds of news? Are we currently experiencing a sexualisation of culture? What does the construction of gender and sexuality in the media tells us about ourselves? Its goal is to aid you in developing your awareness of a range of subjects relevant to media, gender, and sexuality. The module will cover issues such as gender in the news, masculinity in the movies, and the construction of gender roles in advertising.   

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCE5251
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module explores the rich world of cinema, considering key technological, conceptual, theoretical and aesthetic issues in order to gain a better insight the films themselves, the companies that produce them, the money that goes into them, and the audiences who love, and sometimes hate, them. The module will consider how film has shaped knowledge in different contexts and discourses, its ability to represent, and also how shifting spaces have shaped audiences’ experiences of cinema. We will examine the roles of key pioneers of cinematic technologies and debate topics such as: recognising genre, subtexts, “art vs. commerce”, audience demographics, and “truth-telling”. In doing so, this module will survey theoretical, industrial, economic, and cultural aspects ranging from Hollywood to independent cinema, from silent film to 3D screenings, from shocking documentaries to fantastical movie monsters. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%