Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies.

Module codeMC2107
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module is organised to provide a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches to contemporary media. Important
theoretical and methodological issues will be examined in relation to case studies to illustrate the media's role in the construction of
contemporary gender relations

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3517
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This is a module that functions as an introduction to the discipline of Television Studies. Focusing primarily on TV drama, the module
examines the key debates that have framed, and continue to frame, the study of television form (e.g. narrative, aesthetics, genre) and
content. Areas of focus include how to understand television from an academic perspective, analysing multiple areas of televisual content
and form via applying and critiquing key academic and industrial terms and approaches, the impact of institutional structures and contexts
upon multiple areas of industry practice, the historical development and/or academic periodisation of TV drama, and industrial strategies
for targeting and understanding television audiences. The module will thus introduce you to:
Debates around the structures and historical development of the television industry by focusing upon how this has changed over the past
sixty years and how these changes have affected such areas of television fiction as production, distribution, textuality, marketing and
consumption.
Why fictional television programmes take the form that they do by considering how such concepts as narrative, diegesis, character, genre
and aesthetics are employed by television specifically.
How the concept of the ‘audience’ has been understood, and continues to develop, in relation to television fictions

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 70%
Module codeMC3549
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The first part of this course examines: the origins, organisation and techniques of propaganda used by one party states in the twentieth
century. It also aims to give students a sound grasp of the history, organisation and techniques of propaganda and the ability to analyse
and critically evaluate different forms of the practice of propaganda. The second part of the course is concerned with how wars have been
reported and discusses the reasons why so much war reporting has been little more than “war propaganda”.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3551
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module will provide an introduction to the theoretical principles of media research, as well as developing skills for undertaking your
own research on the significance, influence or use of media in society. The module teaches the necessary skills for data collection and
analysis, as well as for critiquing published research. It will thus provide a foundation for all second year students before you embark on
third year modules, which require primary research, or for those intending to write a dissertation. This module will provide the necessary
information and tools for undertaking an academic study, focusing on: choosing the right research question; designing valid and reliable
measures; as well as providing basic skills for analysing the results. The module will include instruction on a range of different
methodologies used in media research, both quantitative and qualitative, including surveys, interviews, content analysis and focus
groups.

Assessment

  • Portfolio: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3566
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module explores the development of a wide-range of visual media such as photography, cinema, television and digital media. Key
technological, conceptual, theoretical and aesthetic issues will be discussed in order to gain a better insight on the actual workings of
media itself. The module will consider how visual media has shaped knowledge in different contexts and discourses, and also how
shifting spaces have shaped audiences’ experiences of screen media. We will examine the roles of key pioneers of visual media
technologies and debate topics such as: aesthetics, “art vs. science”, industry and “truth-telling”. In doing such, this module will survey
both practical and theoretical aspects of media ranging from early histories to modern times, including a variety of subjects and styles.

Assessment

  • Oral/aural assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3585
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module considers the historically complex relationship between media and childhood in western societies. It will examine a number
of longstanding debates on media and children with the aim of understanding contemporary views and responses to children’s media use,
representation and production as well as wider issues around media education, policy and children’s rights

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Presentation: 30%
  • Written assessment: 40%
Module codeMC3589
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is to critically reflect on how effective different media systems are in communicating information and informing
citizens about what is happening in the world. It will examine contemporary news practices and conventions in television news, changing
news values and audience expectations, (de) and (re)regulatory shifts and emerging forms of journalism, market forces and public service
interventions, editorial pressures and occupational values and much more to understand how and why journalism is evolving in the 21st
century.
The module begins by exploring how journalism can be evaluated, unpacking what is meant by ‘quality’ news or news of ‘democratic
value’. It then provides an overview of how news is potentially influenced by competing ownership structures and media systems. In doing
so, the module will compare public and market-driven news organisations and assess how regulatory frameworks and journalism cultures
help shape the production of news.
Having explored how news is made and shaped from a variety of perspectives, the module draws on the latest scholarly research into
elections and the televised leaders’ debates, politics and journalism in a post-devolution United Kingdom, rolling news and the 24/7 news
cycle as well as debates about impartiality and partisan US cable channels and changing news formats. In addition, journalists will be put
under the spotlight, making sense of who they are and whether they are trusted and valued by audiences. All of which is designed not
only to enhance your understanding of contemporary journalism, but for you to carry out your own study and analysis of television news

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3593
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Following 9.11, the 7.7 London tube bombings and the rise of ISIS, stories about terrorism are rarely absent from media headlines.
Religious and cultural differences in Britain have become a political hot topic, and multiculturalism has been subjected to vigorous critique
for supposedly fuelling social division and conflict. Meanwhile, concerns about national and border security have featured within in a
hostile public debate about immigration, asylum and refugee issues, and alarming stories about the rise of gun and knife crime have
pervaded the news, presenting images of violent urban youth cultures and dangerous city streets.
Media, Racism and Conflict will explore a range of contemporary issues, focusing upon how these have been constructed as conflicts in
the media and the extent to which racism has played a role within these conflicts. The module will critically examine print and broadcast
news media, but also current affairs and documentary programming, film and television drama in order to explore a series of questions
about racialised conflict in the media, including how boundaries are drawn between ‘legitimate’ and ‘illegitimate’ cultural identities, the role
of policing and counter terrorism and the media’s role in public debates about cultural diversity, national identity and public security.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 75%
  • Oral/aural assessment: 25%
Module codeMC3595
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module aims to introduce, explore and analyse key issues related to how science, the environment, and health are covered in the
media.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3599
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Widespread understandings of contemporary politics suggest that news media bridge the gap between citizens and their representatives,
informing society at large about political issues and debates, providing a platform for politicians and institutions to announce proposals
and policies, and informing representatives (and citizens themselves) about the state of public opinion. New media, in turn, have often
been perceived as the ultimate democratic panacea, enabling all citizens to publicly express their concerns and to participate directly in
democratic politics.
This module will explore the relationships between journalism, new media, and citizens’ political participation, following relevant academic
debates. Amongst many others, the module will shed light over the following questions: Does journalism foster citizens’ political
participation? Does it contribute to citizens’ alleged disenchantment with politics instead? Have new media increased citizens’ political
activism? Are social media (facebook, twitter…) contributing to making contemporary politics more inclusive, participatory and
democratic?

Assessment

  • Study: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3600
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The programme is centred on 6 distinct topics taught in accordance with the details provided in the timetable which is listed in the
MODULE SCHEDULE SECTION on Learning Central. You will also be given a hardcopy in the first lecture. The academic teaching
programme is based around 6 ‘cycles’ with time being provided for lectures, seminars, assignment preparation and for one to one
feedback sessions.
The lectures which are of approximately 2 hours in duration will provide underpinning information to guide you through the major issues to
be considered in the seminars in each cycle. Those materials on Learning Central which are essential to read for the seminar are in red;
those which I would like you to read are in green; the remaining material will be useful for the assignments or to get a broader
understanding on the topic.
You will all receive worksheets outlining the topics for discussion and why the issues are legally important to the media today. These
worksheets will contain references to basic primary and secondary source material much of which will be placed on Learning Central for
easy access.
My role is to support your learning throughout the module but it must be stressed that you must take responsibility from the outset for
undertaking the research that will be necessary to both contribute to seminar discussions and to utilise the material for your assignments.
I will be delivering all the lectures and seminars

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3607
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module will critically evaluate the variety of roles that media play in a number of different conflict situations. This will include an
examination of the role of the media in representing political protests and demonstrations. It will also involve an examination of the way
the media has represented and influenced the course of a number of sub-state conflicts including Israel-Palestine, Northern Ireland,
South Africa and Rwanda. In these conflicts the media has served very different roles, from the incitement to genocide to the promotion of
peace and reconciliation. The module will also examine the impact of the media on foreign policy decision making and question whether
graphic coverage of distant suffering can trigger humanitarian interventions from Western states, the phenomenon dubbed the ‘CNN
Effect’. In the latter part of the semester we will examine the role of key actors in mediating conflict including journalists, documentary
makers and NGOs. The module will conclude by examining the multiplicity of roles played by the media in the ‘War on Terror’ and the
significance of new media in the 2011 Arab revolts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeMC3608
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The creative industries are one of the fastest growing employment sectors in the UK. This module will provide students with knowledge of
the key creative and cultural sectors and help them to understand the emerging synergies between them. Students will be encouraged
to take a critical approach to the term creative industries and the rhetorics of ‘creativity’, ‘innovation’ and ‘impact’ that often accompany its
use.
The module gives students a timely introduction to the landscape and realities of creative (and media) work, including emerging models of
creative practice and doing business.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 70%
Module codeMC3610
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module has two broad aims: firstly, it intends to introduce you to a range of theoretical debates regarding what constitutes ‘television’
– specifically ‘British television’ – in the digital age. Secondly, the module aims to increase your familiarity with the diverse workings of the
industry, increasing your potential employability for a career in television by introducing you to industry structures and the myriad ways in
which you can pursue a possible career relating to ‘television’. Whilst this module is NOT a practical course in television production, it is
intended to build your knowledge of both the potential opportunities and limitations that the British television industry presents and get you
thinking about areas such as policy, regulation, production, marketing, social media and beyond.
The module is split into three sections. The first focuses on current industrial concerns and how these have been informed by historical
and political changes within the television industry. The second part looks at formal aspects of contemporary television programmes via
tackling issues including digital aesthetics, multi-platforming, transmedia storytelling, commissioning and archiving. The final section looks
at how audiences engage with television, and how these groups are industrially-targeted, through social media platforms and secondscreening
practices.
Whether you are serious about gaining access to the TV industry, or simply have a passing interest in British television within the digital
era, then this module will be for you!

Assessment

  • Presentation: 15%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 60%