English, Communications and Philosophy

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of English, Communication & Philosophy.

Module codeSE1111
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module explores the relationship between language and the mind. How do we plan what we say and write? How do we understand what we hear and read? How are words organised in our memory and why do we sometimes forget them? Why do we sometimes make slips of the tongue? We’ll consider whether it is true that ‘everything important about language is in the head’—how does psycholinguistics relate to the other things we know about language, including context and social interaction? We will critically examine, and try out, the methodologies that psycholinguists use when they attempt to pin down features of language processing. This module will be highly relevant to any student with interests in language learning, language disorders, teaching, or generally in how language works.

This module aims to introduce students to the key ways in which psycholinguistic investigations can inform our understanding of language and the mind, and the limitations of these approaches. By considering language in its biological, cognitive and social contexts, the contribution of various methods used in psycholinguistic research can be evaluated, including how we should interpret ‘lab’-based observations and experiments in relation to findings from other areas of linguistics. Theoretical models of language processing (e.g. speech production, reading, writing) will be examined, with particular reference to evidence of planning errors (e.g. slips of the tongue).

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1112
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to the language norms and communication principles associated with reading and writing activities with -and through- digital media. By observing and creating digital texts, we discuss the impact of digital space upon reading, organising and communicating information online. We consider the underlying principles according to which texts, images, and profiles are interlinked and searched online. We also reflect upon recent changes in the way people present themselves through writing, as well as other social media activities, that capitalise on notions of connectivity and interactivity.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1113
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

In this module, we discover ways of approaching the puzzle of how language works. We start off by thinking about what language is and how it might be defined, then move on to how different answers to these questions have led to different ways of approaching the study of language. Building up answers to how language works, we look at speech sounds and how they form language-specific systems that allow communication. Another building block is the idea of words and other basic units of language and meaning and how they are structured. Theoretical concepts are grounded in examples and application to language problems and challenges faced in real life. The module provides the first part of an essential background for anyone going on to study language in more detail, literature in any language, social development and interaction, or human communication.

Assessment

  • Class test: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
Module codeSE1114
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

In this module, we continue to build knowledge and understanding leading to answers to the puzzle of how language works. We first look at how language is patterned at phrase and sentence level, including theories of how such complex patterns might be acquired by learners of a language. We then look at meaning at the sentence level and what happens to linguistic meaning in contexts of use. Finally, we look at how sentences are organised into texts, and how texts are more than collections of sentences. Theoretical concepts are grounded in examples and application to language problems encountered in real life. By the end of the module, students will be in a position to articulate how key aspects of language operate and how we know this. We will also have a basic grasp of the tools of a scholarly analysis of language that allow us to pursue further questions in the future, including basic transcription skills. The module provides an essential background for anyone going on to study language in more detail, literature in any language, social development and interaction, or human communication.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1115
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module will introduce students to the stages and processes English has gone through to become the language it is today. Students will learn about the history of English (and how it’s related to other Indo-European languages) as well as the many varieties of English that are spoken worldwide.  Students will learn how social factors can influence the way English (and other languages) are used as well as how contact with other languages can affect English.

Assessment

  • Class test: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeSE1116
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module introduces some of the main themes, theories and concepts that underpin the study of communication, by applying these to a broad range of situations and texts from a variety of different media, including film/TV, newspapers and magazines, and the Internet. We discuss the nature of signs and the ways in which they are organised into complex systems. We also consider the important role of metaphor, narrative, and humour in communication. Another central topic is how culture and society impact on communication; we will analyse how people communicate their opinions and ideologies, discuss how we adapt our language(s) depending on the context, and examine how communication helps us to make sense of our existence in the modern world.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1312
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module offers an introduction to various aspects of children's acquisition and use of language and communication from infancy. We begin by evaluating various theoretical and methodological issues involved in the study of children’s developing communicative abilities. We then progress to examine, in turn, how a child acquires (i) a sound system (phonology), (ii) a huge collection of words (vocabulary), (iii) the meaning of words (semantics), (iv) the ability to combine them together (syntax), and (v) to use them appropriately (pragmatics). We assess the linguistic input experienced by children including the (potential) impact of child directed speech, being a twin and growing up in a bilingual environment. We also consider development in atypical populations, including children with both physical and behavioural disabilities.

Assessment

  • Oral/aural assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeSE1318
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module evaluates a range of issues in Language and Communication research. Students will learn to identify, read, understand and critique existing research, formulate their own research questions, conduct literature searches and summaries, and execute a small-scale empirical project.  Students will work with qualitative and quantitative data, and basic numerical skills will be assumed. The aims of the module are to develop research knowledge, understanding and skills to enable students to undertake small projects in Language and Communication. Students will be able to identify different genres and traditions of research, and develop their ability to read, discuss and critique a wide range of research texts. Students will gain skills in designing, analysing, communicating and evaluating their own research project. Students will gain basic skills in data analysis.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
Module codeSE1324
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will introduce the theory and practice of forensic linguistics. First, we analyse the forms and functions of legal language in a wide range of settings throughout the legal process from 999 calls to prison.  This aspect of the module will analyse the discourse characteristics of talk in and around the law and the nature of various written legal texts.  This leads to our second focus: evaluation of the activities of linguists in language reform and the measures taken when individuals are disadvantaged in their contact with the law.  Finally, we will assess the role of the linguist in providing linguistic evidence such as identifying authors and speakers and investigating language crimes.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1327
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module introduces and encourages evaluation of theories of human development across the lifespan. It explores issues such as social and age identity; age categorisation; ageing and age-prejudice, from a language and communication perspective. In these areas, students will critically evaluate empirical studies of how language and social interaction reflect, consolidate and influence human development across the lifespan (from childhood to old age). The module aims to develop a critical understanding of how our society views, talks about and constructs different age groups. The module provides extension in knowledge and skills in understanding age as a social and a discursive concept and in analysing discourse and social interaction, interpersonal communication, institutional interaction as well as media representations in the context of age, ageing and the lifespan.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Presentation: 10%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codeSE1329
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module will provide an understanding of the theories and practices involved in learning and teaching second and foreign languages. The module establishes the relationships between theories of language acquisition and approaches to teaching, and offers a basic grounding in the practical applications of these approaches in the classroom, and by the autonomous learner.

The aims for this module are to analyse current theories and practical issues relating to language learning and teaching methodology. We will focus on the real world problems and challenges of language learning and teaching, and evaluate the methods and interventions which might address these.  We then analyse the ways in which these can be related to theoretical models of language acquisition and language learning. The practical coursework element of the module, together with seminar work, is designed to explore how the theories are put into practice and vice versa. The module demonstrates how research into second language acquisition can inform, and be informed by, the experience of learners and teachers.  It would be good preparation for students interested in working in an educational context, and, for example those thinking of pursuing work experience, career opportunities, and/or further qualifications in language teaching after University.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1336
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Pronunciation is an essential component of language as spoken communication. We distinguish between phonetics, which studies the physical processes by which sounds are made, and phonology, which is the study of how sounds function and pattern in systems that represent words, phrases, grammar and discourse.

The module is intended to cover a presentation of the role that pronunciation plays in our society and culture, including poetry, advertising and entertainment, and the description of the consonants, vowels and stress patterns of English words, the simplification processes (assimilation, etc.) of phrases, rhythm and intonation, in Southern England Standard Pronunciation (formerly known as ‘RP’) but also with reference to differences in other accents.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1340
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

For many people, grammar seems like a bad word but really grammar is about the way we group words into recognisable patterns in order to make meaning. In this module we will look at the main patterns of the English language through a functional account of English grammar called systemic functional linguistics. This approach to the description of English can be used within a wide range of applied linguistic contexts.  We will concentrate mainly on grammar for reading and writing and how grammar is used to create meaning.  At all stages we will draw on a variety of texts. Therefore this module will be of particular interest to those who are interested in pursuing a career where writing and reading play an important role, whether this is for example as a teacher, language therapist or as a writer.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1344
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Relationships are central to our lives, and communication plays a central role in them. In addition, relationship matters may even be the most common topic of our everyday conversations. This module analyses the theories and interdisciplinary research on relational aspects of interpersonal communication. Our primary focus is on communication in close relationships: e.g. relationships with friends, family members, and, in particular, romantic partners. We will analyse the communication processes involved in the dynamics of relationships (e.g. initiation, development, maintenance, conflict, repair, de-escalation, termination), including both the ‘bright’ and ‘dark’ sides of relational communication.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1347
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module offers an introduction to communication disorders. We analyse what it means to have a communication disorder and we identify & discuss various different types of disorders including aphasia, autism, dyslexia, dyspraxia and Williams Syndrome. The causes and the communicative characteristics of these conditions are considered along with possible remedial programmes. Finally, we evaluate the likely impact the disorder has on the person and his/her family, friends and colleagues.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Oral/aural assessment: 20%
Module codeSE1362
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to the various ways in which the term “discourse” is applied to the study of language.  Theories and methods that are covered include: pragmatics and speech act theory, theories of politeness, conversation analysis, ethnography of communication, interactional sociolinguistics, and critical discourse analysis.  Discourse builds on topics covered in year one and provides core theoretical content that is further developed in many year three modules.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1369
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Sociolinguistics analyses how language is meaningfully linked to social differences between people, be it in terms of their geographical origin, their social class, their age or their gender.  This module will provide students with the theoretical background necessary to understand aspects of current sociolinguistic research.  Through exercises and in-class discussions, students will focus particularly on the social factors (style, class, gender, age, and so on) involved in linguistic variation.  The module will also analyse how linguistic variation can be better understood using models of social networks and communities of practice, and will consider aspects of new-dialect formation and the acquisition of variation by children and non-native speakers.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1370
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The first aim of the module is to explore a range of theoretical and descriptive approaches to the relationship between words and their meanings. The second aim is to provide students with an understanding of how to investigate word behaviour.

This module explores the world of words. What is a word? What range of meanings does a word have? How are word meanings related? How can we tell them apart? How do words ‘behave’ in texts? Where do words come from and how do they change? In this module we will explore a number of different approaches to the semantics of words. We will take an investigative look at our words from various perspectives. The emphasis will be on how speakers actually use words in texts. Students will be given the opportunity to gain some hands-on experience using electronic resources (e.g. resources such as the Sketch Engine and various language corpora).

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
Module codeSE1371
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

One of the most important goals of language and communication is persuasion. A great deal of communication that is directed towards us seeks to influence our thinking and feelings about issues and objects, as well as our tastes, and the way we behave. And much of the communication that we direct towards others also seeks to achieve such influence. We may try to persuade others through a variety of means: e.g. by lying or being economical with the truth, by waiting till we think the other person is in the right mood, or by reeling off facts and figures. In this module, students gain an understanding of what is meant by ‘persuading’ people, and become familiar with some of the main theories of persuasion. Students also gain knowledge of some of the many empirical studies into the relative effectiveness of different approaches to persuasion. The module is situated in the field of Human Communication, and we consider persuasion and persuasiveness in relation to a number of different areas such as interpersonal communication, communication in groups and organisations, new media and mass communication. Coverage of persuasion through the media includes some aspects of consumer advertising, but also extends to political advertising, charity appeals, public safety and health campaigns, etc.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE1373
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to a variety of approaches to the analysis of visual communication, including (social) semiotics, psychology, psychoanalysis, art history and cultural studies. Students will acquire the practical skills necessary for describing and interpreting different forms of visual communication and are encouraged to become more aware of the social and cultural significance of images. Students will also learn how to produce magazine covers using Adobe Photoshop Elements, in order to gain a better understanding of the processes involved in contemporary design.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeSE1383
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake independent research in the area of English Language under the supervision of a member of staff. The dissertation provides the opportunity for a thorough, detailed and/or critical study of a particular subject or problem for which the student has an especially strong interest.

Assessment

  • Dissertation: 100%
Module codeSE1384
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake independent research in the area of English Language under the supervision of a member of staff. The dissertation provides the opportunity for a thorough, detailed and/or critical study of a particular subject or problem for which the student has an especially strong interest.

Assessment

  • Dissertation: 100%
Module codeSE1385
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits40

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake independent research in the area of English Language under the supervision of a member of staff.  The extended dissertation provides the opportunity for a thorough, detailed and/or critical study of a particular subject or problem for which the student has an especially strong interest.

Assessment

  • Dissertation: 100%
Module codeSE1386
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits40

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake independent research in the area of English Language and English Literature under the supervision of two members of staff (one from English Language and one from English Literature).  The extended dissertation provides the opportunity for a thorough, detailed and/or critical study of a particular subject or problem for which the student has an especially strong interest.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeSE1398
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module traces the development of the English language over a one-thousand-year period, from its original arrival in fifth-century Britain to the emergence of Early Modern English around 1500 and the birth of Late Modern English towards the end of the 18th century.  Using textual evidence and historical records, we will study how the forms of the language have changed overtime, and will evaluate the impact of external events and political influences on both the internal structure of the language and its social status. .

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeSE1402
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module analyses the close relationship between communication and culture. We shall be debating such questions as: Does language determine thought? What are ‘standard’ languages and why is so much invested in them? How and why do we try to ‘clean up’ language? Is free speech always a good thing? In analysing such themes, we shall be integrating insights from linguistics, anthropology, sociology and psychology. The principal aim of the module is to introduce you to theories and key readings in language and culture, and to help develop your critical and argumentative skills.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeSE1403
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module analyses the role and place of gender in language and communication.  It critically examines studies on children’s socialisation into gender roles, the differences in male and female speech and different theories of approaching language and gender. We evaluate research on the discursive construction of participants’ gender identity in interaction. We will also analyse linguistic sexism, representations of gender, the construction of gender and sexuality in talk and text, and assess the relevance of gender in educational and institutional settings.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 45%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 5%
Module codeSE1405
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is to develop our understanding of digital language, discourse and literacy as an area of study. We will focus especially on internet-based discourse, including for example e-mail messages, Twitter, discussion lists, chat, Social Network Sites, blogging, and virtual communities. In this module, we will analyse the nature of digital text(s) as a mode of discourse, including the relation between text, meaning, human agency and technology.

 

This module analyses systematically digital language and communication, with a focus on issues related to digital literacy. This includes considering the register and genre of various types of digital text (Twitter, Facebook, blogs, wikis, Tumblr, etc.), including the semiotic resources available and the relationship between text, meaning, human agency and technology.

 

This module will develop students’ understanding of some of the following areas: textually-mediated communication, digital research methods, digital language and literacies in social contexts. It will also develop skills in applying linguistic theories, methodologies and tools, such as discourse analysis, (interactional) sociolinguistics, and pragmatics to digital contexts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 75%
Module codeSE1408
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module aims to enhance students’ understanding of a variety of media discourse genres, ranging from broadcast talk to social media discourse. We focus particularly on how media discourse in public participation media has changed over time in relation to specific technological developments, such as the introduction of new technologies, and wider social and political phenomena, such as globalisation. We analyse a range of media forms and their meanings, as articulated primarily through language, and evaluate issues relevant to media production, audience/user participation, media disputes, mediated narratives and advice-giving. This module aims to develop students’ understanding of how different approaches can be used to analyse a range of media genres, drawing on conversation analysis, media discourse analysis, and interactional sociolinguistics.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeSE1409
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to the ‘graphic memoir’ (or autobiographical comic book) genre, which, over the past 40 years, has become an increasingly popular way of telling personal stories of considerable complexity and depth. Drawing on concepts from several disciplines, including linguistics, semiotics, multimodality, and literary and narrative theory, the module considers works that cover a broad range of subject matters and employ many different artistic styles. The focus is on the unique formal features of graphic memoirs. We analyse how narrative meaning is made through complex interactions between several semiotic resources, including pictures, the written word, colour, layout, and typography. Students are also taught to do analyse extracts from key texts, examining their formal features and locating them in their social, historical and literary contexts.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 75%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeSE1411
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module equips students with the necessary terminology and practical skills for the linguistic description and analysis of text that is the basis of applied and topic-specific language studies.  The module will cover the basics of phonology, grammatical structure and clause semantics from a theory-neutral perspective.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeSE1413
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will consider how language and, more specifically, dialect are used in literature and film. The approach will focus primarily on sociolinguistic aspects rather than stylistic ones, and will aim to allow students to assess how literature and film reflect actual language and what this may tell us about linguistic attitudes and use.

The module will give students a grounding in the main features and characteristics of a range of British and North American dialects, and will provide a general historical introduction to dialect use in (English) literature, in terms of both literary dialect and dialect literature. Students will also be introduced to the basic methods of corpus linguistics work, so that they are able to conduct small-scale analyses themselves. In terms of language in film, the module will focus particularly on the representation of accents, for example, how speakers of foreign accents are portrayed.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 75%
Module codeSE1414
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This research-led module specifically examines the nature of persuasion in the legal process but in the much broader context of debate about persuasion-related issues of central importance across the humanities and social sciences: narrative, voice, conflict, identity, evidence, expertise, regulation and ideology. Persuasion permeates all phases of the legal process from police interrogation to judicial argument, from lay testimony in small claims courts to legal advice about the torture of terrorist suspects. But what makes persuasion in the legal process particularly interesting is that the law as an institution tends to deny that the process has anything to do with persuasion. The legal process is thus a test-bed for the line between persuasion and deception that invokes the timely and timeless issues of truth, trust and technology. The module will consider the rhetorical origins of ‘forensic discourse’ and will analyse some key elements of persuasion – narrative, argument and evidence – as they play out in the highly regulated but conflict-ridden forensic context. The aim of the module is to generate critical reflection about the intersection of persuasive forensic discourse with such key social issues as power, ideology, identity, voice and expertise. The module complements such modules as Forensic Linguistics and Persuasive Communication but it does not assume any knowledge of either persuasion or the legal process.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeSE1416
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

In this module you will learn about how language models and theories can be applied to the analysis of creative genres such as novels, poetry, plays, persuasive speeches and multimodal texts. You will build on your theoretical knowledge of language and develop practical experience in the application of this knowledge to a range of creative texts. You will be given the opportunity for lots of hands-on, practical work, as a basis for developing analytic skills.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
Module codeSE1417
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module analyses communication in professional settings, approaches to intercultural communication, and the role culture and cultural identities may play in professional contexts. The course will focus primarily on spoken interactions, such as workplace meetings and presentations, media interviews, and various problem-solving interactions in a range of professional settings. Theories and methods that are covered include discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, intercultural communication, management studies, interactional sociolinguistics, pragmatics and gendered discourse. The course aims to build on courses covered in years one and two, and to develop students’ cultural intelligence and employability skills in preparation for their future careers.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 90%
  • Presentation: 10%
Module codeSE2139
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module provides an introduction to some key developments and influences on the history of the English stage. Students will read classical, Renaissance, Restoration and modern plays in their critical and cultural context. They will develop key critical vocabulary that focuses in particular on diverse ideas of tragedy, comedy, and the performance of social and gendered roles on stage and in society. Lectures and seminars will be devoted to discussions of staging practices, interpretation of performances, and close analysis of texts. The first section of the module focuses on drama from the ancient Greeks to the Renaissance. These weeks explore the emergence of drama from ritualistic affirmations of community and shared mythologies to its evolution as a public entertainment that engaged with and often critiqued prevailing ideas about social structures, poetic expression, public performance, and identity. The second section of the module concentrates on the development of the modern stage, beginning with the nineteenth-century ‘New Drama’ movement and ending with contemporary theatre: it explores ideas about meaning, argument, and relevance as they have been enacted and debated on the mainstream stage.  Ultimately, the span of this module will help students to appreciate the flexibility of drama as a genre, and encourage them to continue to explore the diverse means through which drama continually engages with its literary, social, political, and cultural environment.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 100%
Module codeSE2140
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

From Christopher Marlowe’s claim that his ‘rude pen/ Can hardly blazon forth the loves of men’ to Ted Hughes’s description of his marriage as ‘only a story./ Your story. My story’, the authoring of love has been a prominent theme in western culture and literature. This cross-period module offers an in-depth study of some famous literary treatments of tragic love in poetry, the novel, and drama, focussing on the various ways in which these works have tested their contemporary political, social, and cultural environments. The module will examine literary constructions of tragic love from different ages and genres, from classical Greek poetry to the contemporary novel. It will pay close attention to literary form, theoretical and critical responses, and historical and cultural context. In so doing, it will encourage students to formulate informed and independent conclusions about evolving constructions – in literature and society -- of love, fate, family, physical/spiritual eroticism, morality, and tragedy.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE2142
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module explores the reciprocal relationships between literature and visual culture, encompassing materials ranging from the late eighteenth century to the present day and is taught in two Blocks. The first Block is taught in Weeks 1-5 and focuses on the way in which literary texts respond to and rework visual images (particularly paintings). Block 2 is taught in Weeks 7-11 and reverses the critical trajectory by looking at how literary texts have been given visual expression, whether in terms of book-illustration, television, film or other visually-based media. The module addresses the following questions:

  • How do we think about the relationships between the visual and the verbal—artist and author—as they occur in literature? Are such relationships harmonious or are they characterized, rather, by a sense of rivalry and rebellion?
  • How do intermedial exchanges between image and text provide an arena for the articulation of broad questions about gender, sexuality, race, slavery, class, family, religion and the natural world?
  • What are the similarities and differences between the ways in which we interpret literary texts and visual images?

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeSE2143
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Our most familiar ideas about authorship are bound up with concepts of individuality and selfhood, but what is the self, and why do we attach so much importance to it? This module offers an introduction to key ideas about selfhood and subjectivity in literature, focusing particularly on Romantic and Victorian explorations of, and experiments with, constructing the self. The Romantic period saw a new focus upon selfhood, within a revolutionary political and intellectual context where established truths and allotted identities were being challenged. The nature of the artist, especially the poet, was of especial concern: what was a ‘poet’, and who was that singular ‘I’ in the text? And how did a poet’s gender inflect popular notions of his or her literary authority? In the Victorian period the so-called ‘Woman Question’ led writers of both genres to interrogate female subjectivity and to speculate on whether selfhood itself was gendered. In order to explore the many facets of this rich topic, the module will examine texts from a range of literary genres, including poetry, the novel, autobiography, biography, the short story, journals and letters, non-fictional prose and pastiche, alongside critical and theoretical works, concluding with a discussion of Roland Barthes’ notion of the ‘death of the author’.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
Module codeSE2144
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will concentrate on creative reading.  Students will be introduced to the idea of ‘reading as a writer’ and be encouraged to develop their skills as critical readers and creative writers through the close reading of set texts, the study of authors’ creative choices and processes, and the undertaking of creative writing exercises.  The emphasis of this module will be on reading literature in terms of craft and technique, with an eye to imitation, emulation, and parody, together with an exploration of creative writing in terms of wider questions of diversity, authorship, identity and environment.  Students will be encouraged to examine how critical reflection and creative practice inform and feed back into each other and to view writing as part of an ongoing, provisional process, informed by divergent influences, experiences and backgrounds.  They will be introduced to the central elements of the writer’s workshop, such as constructive criticism, peer reviewing, and formative writing, and begin to experiment in different forms and genres.  The focus of this module will be on encouraging students to situate their own writing in terms of, and in response to, other writing/literature, which will provide a foundation for exploring and developing their own distinctive voice in the Creative Writing module.

Assessment

  • Portfolio: 40%
  • Portfolio: 60%
Module codeSE2145
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Creative Writing builds on the foundations provided in the Creative Reading module, allowing students to utilise the knowledge and techniques they have developed through their critical and creative engagement with other literary texts as a means of discovering and exploring their own distinctive voice and style.  In terms of writing, the emphasis of this module will shift from imitation and emulation to individual expression: students will be encouraged to take what they have learnt through reading as writers and begin to apply that in the shaping and completing of new and original creative work.  There will be an opportunity to focus on the genres of fiction and poetry, as well as script writing and creative non-fiction. Students will be asked to experiment in a variety of forms, to initiate new ideas, develop appropriate formal strategies, address technical problems and tackle the demands of different literary genres. This module will offer a stepping stone towards the specialist genre options provided in the second year, as well as introducing students to the idea of creative research – such as working with historical sources - and encouraging them to reflect on how writers present and discuss their work in public. 

Assessment

  • Portfolio: 30%
  • Portfolio: 70%
Module codeSE2146
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Critical Reading and Critical Writing introduces students to some key critical questions to be considered in the university-level study of English Literature, with a particular focus on developing skills in critical reading, independent research, and writing – and with an emphasis on developing student awareness of the extent to which society and culture inform reading and criticism. The module focuses on the development of essential skills in literary analysis, interpretative reading, and written expression. It also pays close attention to some of the many social and cultural factors that can inform literary creativity and critical response. Students will consider such questions as the relationship between form and theme, tone and style, literary tradition and social context, and critical reading and ideology -- thus honing their analytical skills and developing their instincts towards independent and informed, researched interpretation. 

Assessment

    Module codeSE2147
    LevelL4
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    Medieval writers placed extraordinary emphasis on the human body. This module studies some of the ways in which the body was configured, transformed and controlled by numerous social, cultural and religious discourses. Following introductory lectures that establish the module’s historical, linguistic and theoretical contexts, the next three weeks examine three examples of comic tales written by Geoffrey Chaucer. In these narratives, the body customarily forms an object of commodification and exchange, often to ingenious comic effect. The religious context and scatological humour of the Pardoner’s Tale moves into darker territory in Chaucer’s Prioress’s Prologue and Tale – the first of three hagiographical and religious texts that make up the middle section of the module. Here, ideas of purity and pollution, motherhood and monstrosity, and pathos and anti-Semitism come to the fore. Finally, the module moves to three examples of body-focused romances, which are read in terms of the boundaries between animals and human, pagan and Christian, politics and waste.

     

    By the end of the module, students will have studied a variety of medieval literary genres and become familiar with several ways in which contemporary writers considered the human body – its nature and functions, as well as its relationship to ideas of sex, social identity, gender and spirituality.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2283
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module will introduce students to the fiction of the Indian subcontinent and will examine relationships between nation, trauma and politics. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2370
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module focuses on special topics in Creative Writing, allowing students insight into particular themes, forms, styles and conceptions of literature and writing, building on the foundations established in Creative Writing 1.

    Creative Writing I is a pre-requisite to Creative Writing II and Creative Writing III.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2373
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module focuses on special topics in Creative Writing, allowing students insight into particular themes, forms, styles and conceptions of literature and writing, building on the foundations established in Creative Writing 1 & 2. It is designed for serious writers.

    Creative Writing I is a pre-requisite to Creative Writing II and Creative Writing III.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2395
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The module teaches students how to approach illustrated texts, making them aware of the complexity of the relationship between word and image, and giving them an understanding of the history of the illustrated book from the late eighteenth century to the present.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2445
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module offers in-depth study of a number of some the most exciting key modernist fictions by Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, Virginia Woolf, Samuel Beckett and James Joyce. Through sustained close reading, an attention to language, and a sensitivity to literary influence and context, we will explore these wilful, brilliant, funny, and sometimes challenging texts. In doing so, students will develop an ability to draw associations between individual works and the movement known as ‘modernism’ itself, exploring modernist aesthetics and the fragmentation of meaning inherent in so much modernist fiction.

    We will cover a selection of major texts by Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, Virginia Woolf, Samuel Beckett and James Joyce. The module places emphasis on the importance of close-reading and analytical skills, and particular attention will be paid to placing the texts in the context of modernism as a whole.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2448
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module seeks to introduce students to a range of literary texts written in English by Welsh authors in the twentieth century. It offers a thought-provoking, complementary account of writing from Wales to set beside students’ knowledge of English and American literature of the same period. The range of set texts, encompassing both fiction and poetry, will be studied in their cultural, historical, and literary contexts. Authors studied include well-known names such as Dylan Thomas and Gillian Clarke, alongside less well-known but fascinating and accessible writers such as Gwyn Thomas and Dorothy Edwards. Students will engage with themes such as national identity and belonging, language, gender, place, class, ethnicity, migration, and social change, as well as paying close critical attention to the literary and stylistic aspects of the set texts. Relevant theoretical perspectives will also be explored, including feminist and post-colonial perspectives, as well as some of the seminal work of the Welsh cultural critic, Raymond Williams.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE2449
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module offers an introduction to critical theory and the difference that it makes to the analysis of literature. No prior knowledge of critical theory is assumed, and literary examples will be used throughout the course to support and illuminate the reading of the theoretical texts.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2450
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This survey module offers an introduction to the first generation of Romantic poets, William Wordsworth, William Blake, Robert Burns and S. T. Coleridge as well the lesser-known poets Charlotte Smith and Mary Robinson.  The module emphasises the importance of poetic analysis as well as the context of first-generation Romanticism and is aimed at students who have not previously studied poetry of the Romantic age or who wish to broaden their knowledge of the field.  As such, the module provides a relatively broad survey (rather than an in-depth study of the work of any one poet) and is organized around key themes and concepts.  Students will develop an ability to draw associations between individual works and the movement known as ‘Romanticism’ itself, exploring Romantic aesthetics, the creative imagination, the supernatural, the ballad, nature, the French Revolution, and the city.  We will also pay close attention to poetic form and metre.

    Over the course of one semester we will cover a selection of poems by the first-generation Romantic poets, Wordsworth, Blake, Burns and Coleridge as well the lesser-known poets Charlotte Smith and Mary Robinson. The module emphasises the importance of poetic analysis alongside key Romantic concepts and contexts.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    Module codeSE2451
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The module offers an introduction to African American literature from 1845 to the present, situating it within its changing historical, literary and cultural contexts. Indicative topics to be covered:

    • The Middle Passage and its literary legacies
    • the ‘peculiar institution’ of slavery
    • ‘double consciousness’
    • double oppression
    • The Harlem Renaissance
    • racial and cultural hybridity
    • the ideology of lynching
    • strategies of resistance
    • orality, literacy and music (spirituals, jazz and the blues)
    • supernaturalism and the Gothic

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2457
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The imaginary journey has been a source of fascination for writers in English since the publication of Thomas More’s Utopia in 1517. This course offers a survey of some of those journeys, read in the light of a series of themes: technology, gender, power, and geographical space, up to and including Huxley’s Brave New World

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2463
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    On this module we will trace the representation of the city in a variety of modernist texts, including poetry, novels, short stories, films, visual art, and theoretical writing, paying particular attention to the historical and cultural context of these texts.

    The rise of urban life had a huge effect on the literary and artistic movement of the first half of the twentieth century known as modernism, and on the construction of the twentieth-century subject. Indeed, modernity itself can be identified as having grown in concert with the dominance of the metropolis. The mixture of fascination and revulsion with which modernist writers inhabited their cities is key to the texts we will look at on this course. We will identify this paradoxical sense of the city as a site of possibility, of chance collision and erotic encounter, but also as imbued with the fragmentary and alienating effects of urbanism – the city can be, as it was for James Joyce, ‘the centre of paralysis’. This module will investigate a wide range of modernist responses to the city: literary, artistic, theoretical, and cinematic.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 20%
    • Written assessment: 80%
    Module codeSE2464
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module will explore some key themes in medieval literature through a selection from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales as well as an anonymous romance of the fourteenth century, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. The focus will be particularly on how these texts support and/or subvert ideas of chivalry, and thereby interrogate matters of genre and themes of love, friendship, gender, truth and power. The texts will be read closely in relation to their literary, social and historical contexts.

    This is a course suitable both for students who have never studied Chaucer or other medieval literature and also for those who already have some familiarity with Middle English. The Canterbury Tales will be read in the original Middle English, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight will be read in a parallel text edition with facing translation into modern English.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE2468
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this course is to introduce students to the changing and complex nature of first-wave gothic fiction published between 1764 and 1824, by close readings of novels and other texts from the period, as well as consideration of literary and film adaptations over the last 250 years.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2469
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    ‘All circumstances taken together, the French Revolution is the most astonishing thing that has hitherto happened in the world’ wrote Edmund Burke in 1790. The period that we now call Romantic was dominated by revolution and by responses to a series of revolutions occurring at home and abroad. This module will survey a broad range of genres, including poetry, philosophy, fiction, the essay, and drama, in order to investigate the vexed relationship between Romantic art and revolution. It will chart significant shifts occurring in the national and global politics of the period, as well as in literature, technology, science, and philosophical modes of thinking about human beings, their rights, and their impact on the nonhuman world around them.

    The module will ask students to work closely with literary texts and will situate them in their historical context, but it will also encourage careful thinking about the continuities and discontinuities between the Romantic period and our own time. Romanticism is often considered as the beginning of modernity and Wordsworth’s Preface to Lyrical Ballads has similarly been seen as initiating a brave new world for modern art. But does this narrative oversimplify the connections between Romanticism and eighteenth-century aesthetics? And is it hard for us to assess the aesthetics and politics of the period from a vantage point that is arguably constructed by it? In addition to providing a good grounding in Romantic literature, this module will ask these and other serious questions about the relationship between history, politics and aesthetics in the period. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 70%
    • Presentation: 30%
    Module codeSE2470
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module will explore and analyse selected works of interwar fiction (novel, drama, short fiction, film) by American authors. It will focus on the response of that writing to such prevailing social and national issues as the legacy and imminence of war; communism, socialism, and labour movements in America; capitalism and the ‘American Dream’; technology, modernity, and the individual; New Deal politics; race, history, and modern America; the public performance of gender and sexuality; and the position of the writer within contemporary culture. Equally central to this module is a focus on the aesthetic language through which these responses are articulated, particularly in the context of the many literary and cultural innovations that characterized that moment. Discussions will consider such topics as modernism and modernity; the self-conscious development of an American style and literary canon; Southern Agrarians, regionalism and the city; the relationship between journalism and literature; the relationship between genre fiction and ‘serious’ literature; and the relationship between literature, drama, and mainstream cinema.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2471
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    Literature and Science offers an introduction to the study of the intersections between literary forms (the novel, poetry and drama) and scientific investigation and discovery. Covering a wide historical range, from the eighteenth century to the present day, the module will consider how writers engage with science, represent it in their work and ultimately reimagine and critique it for their readers. Uniquely, the module will also read scientific narratives using literary techniques: considering the work of some of the most important British scientists of the past two centuries, asking what literary qualities their writing reveals, and how engagements with literature influenced their science.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2475
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The Victorians lived in a world saturated with images, from the pictures that appeared in newspapers, books and magazines to the paintings that lined the walls of the Royal Academy. This was a period that saw rapid developments in techniques for reproducing images, the birth of new artistic movements, and, of course, the invention of photography. This module will examine diverse aspects of Victorian visual culture (e.g. gender roles, racial politics, fashion, class, representations of childhood) as a way of exploring how the Victorians embodied themselves and their values in art. The aim of this examination will be to formulate new understandings of the relation between images and culture. To what extent, for example, can pictures be seen as documentary evidence of the Victorian period? How far do they participate in and/or subvert dominant values about gender, race or class? By addressing these questions, the module will view pictures as part of the fabric of Victorian culture rather than merely contextual, and will thus problematise the notion of culture itself.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2476
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module aims to introduce students to the extraordinary output of British women writers in the long eighteenth century. It will look at a diverse range of genres as well as consider some dominant themes in works produced by, and sometimes about, British women. Themes addressed may include piety, domesticity, romance, feminism, anti-feminism, and education. The course will also address the means and modes of women’s involvement in literary culture and subsequent concerns with the history of women’s literary history. Authors covered will include Katherine Philips, Aphra Behn, Anne Finch, Elizabeth Singer Rowe, Eliza Haywood, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and Elizabeth Carter.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2477
    LevelL6
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    This module looks at Shakespeare’s major tragedies and then examines the staging of history in Shakespeare’s history plays.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE2479
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    In 1893, the historian Frederick Jackson Turner declared that ‘American social development has been continually beginning over again on the frontier. This perennial rebirth, this fluidity of American life, this expansion westward with its new opportunities, its continuous touch with the simplicity of primitive society, furnish the forces dominating American character.’ His statement exemplifies how the western frontier has long been mythologised as the wellspring of American national identity. As his remarks also illustrate, the frontier has been in constant flux in terms of its location, geography and meanings; consequently, the attached national myth has had to evolve.

    On this module, we will analyse the creation, development and contestation of the myth of the Wild West by examining different literary and cinematic works. We will explore this myth’s significance for constructions of nationality, individual selfhood, gender and political affiliation. As well as engaging with many ‘classic’ examples, we will consider how more critical or revisionist Westerns have reinterpreted this period of American ‘history’, often by condemning its violence, racism and gender politics. Meanwhile, we will be tracing the fortunes of one of twentieth-century America’s most influential popular culture genres. In particular, we will examine the development of both literary and cinematic Westerns to gain greater understanding of their mutual borrowings and influence. Over the course of the module, the diverse range of texts will enable us to pose and theorise larger questions about the formation of literary and cinematic genres.

    Assessment

    • Presentation: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2480
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Featuring ideas of lust, faith, prostitution, repentance, beauty, madness and torture, this module studies a range of spiritual texts focusing on women’s experience in the premodern period. Focusing on writings concerned with a variety of female saints, mystics and martyrs, the module engages with a number of contemporary critical debates about premodern women’s writing, body studies, and sexuality and gender theories, and will focus on the key ideas of chastity, purity and defilement, violence and sainthood, mysticism and personal belief.

    After a series of introductory lectures that lay out some of the historical and critical contexts, the course begins by looking at a variety of texts focused on female saints, beginning with the English Christina of Markyate. Christina was a prominent anchoress and later prioress, whose Life follows the typical route of hagiographies, but embellishes it with many details that proved influential on later texts, including accounts of her sexual desire, her insistence on a chaste marriage and her power as a prioress. Chaucer’s Second Nun’s Tale picks up on similar themes. Here, a female preacher, who again insists on a chaste marriage, grows to prominence due to her faith and resourcefulness, until she is gaoled and tortured by pagan authorities. Her immunity from various physical and psychological torments made her a symbol for unwavering beliefs and chastity throughout the medieval period. A very different figure is Mary Magdalene, one of the most multi-faceted saints who served many different functions for different segments of society. The archetypal sinner who repented and was redeemed was potentially relevant to every Christian, although it frequently provided lessons for female sinners or sexual sinners in particular. The South English Legendary’s ‘Life of Mary Magdalene’ infuses Mary’s traditional Life – her unbridled sexuality and great wealth; her repentance and negated sexuality; and her chastising of the rich and powerful – with many tropes and conventions of secular verse romances. The Digby Mary Magdalene is the most spectacular of late-medieval English plays. Highly dramatic and featuring more than 40 speaking parts, it employs complex staging and pyrotechnic special effects to dramatize Mary’s vita, from her privileged family life, to her conversion and preaching

    The second half of the module focuses on the writing of women’s religious experience from the late fourteenth to mid sixteenth centuries. It begins with the work of Julian of Norwich, whose Revelation of Divine Love (c. 1395) is the first book in the English language known to have been written by a woman. A series of recorded mystical visions and contemplations on love and hope, illness, religious schisms and war, the Revelation combines rhetorical sophistication, theological precision and often studied anonymity – despite her claim to have been ‘a simple creature unlettered’. The work of Julian’s fellow mystic, Margery Kempe, is the product of a very different experience. A proto-autobiography, The Book of Margery Kempe – apparently chronicled by several male scribes – records her madness, financial ruin, religious ecstasies, marital problems and dangerous treks to distant shrines. The final text studied is The Examinations of Ann Askew, an autobiographical account of the life, ordeals and beliefs of one of England’s most remarkable Protestant martyrs. A preacher and writer, Askew demanded a divorce from her Catholic husband, after enduring a brutal marriage, before taking up a life of ‘gospelling’ in London, before being gaoled and tortured in the Tower of London, before being burnt at the stake in July 1546.

    By the end of the module students will have encountered a range of premodern religious writings and should have developed an understanding of how these texts were produced in – and responded to - periods shaped by cultural and theological contests for authority, rapid social change, and increasing religious dissent.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE2481
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module covers the major movements and key figures of poetry from Ireland, Britain and the United States since the 1950s. The module will explore how tensions between tradition and innovation have come to define major trends in the poetry of the last 60 years. Week by week, we will see how poetries from both sides of the Atlantic have engaged with ideas of form, technique, and experimentation as well historical experience and questions of identity. Some of the poetry we will encounter is difficult because it challenges our basic assumptions about what poetry is, but understanding why contemporary poets have found it necessary to pose these challenges is a crucial part of this module’s aims. The poetry on the module will be supplemented by key theoretical discussions and statements of intent. These documents will alert us to the importance of ‘poetics’—the theory and philosophy of poetry—for understanding contemporary poetic practice. Alongside attention to formal innovation, we will also look carefully at the impact of social contexts from the radical anti-authoritarian politics of the Beat Generation to the history of colonialism in the Afro-Caribbean rhythms of dub poetry.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2482
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module examines constructions of ‘the girl’ and girlhood in contemporary women’s writing. Encompassing a variety of genres – including chick lit, memoir, short stories and graphic novels – it will consider how and why ‘the girl’ emerged as a powerful new model of female independence and empowerment in the 1990s, as well the ways in which ‘the girl’ acts as a more troublesome figure in recent experimental writing. Locating its exploration in the context of popular and theoretical feminist and postfeminist discourses, the module will explore how the figure of ‘the girl’ brings into focus questions about: traditional femininity; time, place and space; sex and sexuality; family, community and national identity; gender, dress and performance; marginality and difference; destruction and disorder; and the messiness of growing up girl.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2483
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module introduces students to the demands of writing for a juvenile audience. It focuses in particular on considering how far this readership’s experiences, interests and aesthetics require specific writing approaches in terms of genre, subject matter, address, style and form. Students will be encouraged to consider critically their own assumptions about what makes an effective children’s book, and to write in a variety of forms, from picture-book texts to young adult fiction. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2484
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module is designed for those students who enjoy making connections between the literature they read and the writing they produce, who enjoy playing with narrative possibilities, fictive structures and different voices. Students will be asked to push their writing in new directions to gain greater narrative flexibility and ‘muscle’.  This is an advanced fiction module and will explore in greater depth many of the techniques and elements of craft introduced in Creative Reading and Creative Writing. It will focus in particular on such issues as point of view, style, dialogue, setting and voice. There will also be an opportunity to experiment in the writing of historical fiction, in using multiple narrators, and in engaging creatively with other fictions.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2485
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The predominant literary form in English over the past two centuries has been the novel, i.e. fiction. A paradox of the subject you are studying on this module is that it is defined by what it is not.

    Creative nonfiction contains within its parameters a variety of literary forms, ranging from reportage to the traveller’s account, political and cultural commentary, and the philosophical or personal essay. A Handbook of Literature defines the personal essay – the creation of the sixteenth century French soldier, scholar and magistrate Michel de Montaigne – as ‘a kind of informal essay, with an intimate style, some autobiographical content or interest, and an urbane conversational manner.’

    It is these forms with which we will be mainly concerned during the semester, although, as you will soon become aware, there is plenty of scope for innovation and invention.

    Students will be expected to study, discuss and produce their own examples of writing within the broad remit of creative nonfiction. The module will include discussions of style and poetics in relation to non-fiction writing, as well as close readings of the informal or personal essay, memoir and travel writing. Creative nonfiction develops students’ powers of description, of coherent narrative development, and a honing of dispassionate observational skills.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2486
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    Microfiction and flash fiction are terms used to describe a form of writing that currently enjoys extraordinary popularity and is highly suited to internet publishing. These very short fictions share with prose poetry – a related genre in which the narrative impulse is often less pronounced – the need to be rich in implication, tight and precise, compressed and highly charged.

    These classes will encourage students to write short pieces (whether framed as fiction or prose poetry) that are self-contained, transformative and supple, and that strive to imply considerably more than their actual word count would suggest.

    The critical dimension of the module will explore the creative process involved in the writing of very short stories and prose poems. It will also acknowledge traditionally-held beliefs about the differences between the writing and nature of poetry and that of fiction. One of our tasks will be to cloud this distinction in an attempt to discover for ourselves what it is that makes one piece of writing ‘a prose poem’ and another a ‘short short story’, a question that begs another question: what difference does it really make what we call a piece a writing?

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2487
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module explores key aspects of contemporary poetry writing. Through seminars and workshops, students will develop the skills to critically analyse their own poetic writing and the writing of their peers alongside a range of published poems from more than one tradition. Students will draft and revise a portfolio of original poems that display an awareness of readership, literary traditions such as form and genre, and the specific demands of the contemporary era. Since this module has special relevance to students considering careers in the creative sector, there may be opportunities for students to perform poems, write collaboratively, record their work, undertake short ersatz writing residencies, or explore the evolving relationship between poetry and new digital technologies.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2488
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module builds on some of the skills developed in the module on Screenwriting. Students are well-advised to take Screenwriting before taking this module, although this is not compulsory. The module will cover characterisation; stage imagery and setting; poetic rhythm and variety in dialogue; the use of suspense, surprise, subtext, foreshadowing and dramatic irony in dialogue; how to write a scene and how to combine scenes; and the dramatic unities of time, place and action. When discussing radio drama, students will also explore the use of narrative voices in radio drama and ways to suggest location and action solely through voice and sound. Students will write a variety of different pieces throughout the module that will provide them with the basis for their portfolio. For their portfolio, all students will write short scripts for both radio and theatre or one longer script for either medium.  

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2489
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module will introduce students to the study and practice of screenwriting. It will explore characterisation and narrative structure; visual storytelling and the use of pictures and movement to convey mood and atmosphere. Other elements explored include the use of suspense, surprise, subtext, foreshadowing and dramatic irony in dialogue. Students will study how to write a scene and how to combine scenes, the uses and misuses of voice-over, and the dramatic unities of time, place and action. They will write a variety of different pieces throughout the module that will provide them with the basis for their portfolio. Students may submit one longer script or up to three shorter scripts.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2490
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module builds on previous modules to explore advanced aspects of contemporary poetry writing. Through seminars and workshops, students will hone their skills in creative reading and critical analysis, analysing their own poetic writing and the writing of their peers alongside a range of published poems from more than one tradition. Students will draft and revise a portfolio of original poems that display an advanced awareness of readership, literary traditions such as form and genre, and the specific demands of the contemporary era. Since this module has special relevance to students considering careers in the creative sector, there may be opportunities for students to perform poems, write collaboratively, record their work, or explore the evolving relationship between poetry and new digital technologies.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2491
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module develops skills in the reading and writing of short focused fiction. Students will gain deeper insights into the history and complexities of the short story form, exploring a range of differing styles, subject matter and techniques in both the course reader and in handouts. They will consider what constitutes a short story and what elements make the form effective and compelling. They will be encouraged to read a diverse range of stories (set text and handouts) in order to explore fully the subtleties and scope of this rich form. Through reading, discussion and practice, they will build an understanding of the short story’s building blocks: dramatic openings, a strong narrative voice, concentration, the need for conflict and development, the subtle links between form and content, strong and consciously crafted endings.  By experimenting and emulating, students will build potential story material and then develop and polish work in the workshop and in tutor one-to-ones until the writing reaches portfolio standard. This course is suitable for those students new to the form, and those who want to extend and develop their skills.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2524
    LevelL6
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    The dissertation allows you to undertake an extended piece of self-directed research within the subject area of English Literature. The dissertation should offer clear evidence of independent work and secondary reading. It should normally be grounded in a module you have already completed, but must not duplicate materials used elsewhere in other modules.

     

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2551
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module explores key developments in modern drama, also examining its evolving relationship with film and music-drama.

    The first half of the module will discuss the development of an ideal of modern drama both in theory and practice. Our discussion will consider some key European dramas and discussions of the fundamental role and function of drama in society. The focus of the module will then turn to plays representative of twentieth-century trends in British and American theatre. We will pay close attention to the engagement of that theatre with cultural and historical events and to the development of an ideal of drama as a national art.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2564
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The emergence of cultural fears of ‘monsters’ is particularly vibrant in the collective unconscious in times of political, social, and cultural upheavals, such as the turn of centuries, which spell beginnings and endings, the loss of old belief structures and the quest for new certainties, confusion and experimentation. The aim of this module is to consider what late-Victorian and (post-millennial) neo-Victorian images of monstrosity might tell us about the fears and fantasies of the respective periods. We will examine how these anxieties are reflected and conceptualised in Gothic form in fiction and other modes of cultural production such as film. Drawing on feminist and psychoanalytic theory, we will discuss the cultural and psychological constructions of moral ‘evil’ and sexual danger attributed to the (gendered, raced, sexed, classed) Other at the two fins de siècle and, through pairs and sets of texts from the two periods, explore the ways in which contemporary writers have adapted, modernised, politicised, and subverted Victorian forms of Gothic.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2568
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module examines literary and visual representations of British Caribbean slavery between the 1790s and the 1860s and in our own postcolonial moment and explores the relationships between these two bodies of historically distinct but thematically interconnected materials. Indicative topics include:

    • The Middle Passage
    • Pro-slavery Discourse
    • Abolitionist Discourse and the Question of Sugar
    • Slavery and the Gothic
    • Creole Identities and Anxieties
    • Plantation Culture, Sexual Violence and Miscegenation
    • Strategies of Resistance
    • Orality and Literacy
    • Intertextualities
    • Questions of Representation: Making and Breaking the Silence

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2579
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this module is to read in sequence Fragments VII to X of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales in order to comprehend the issues, contexts and connections that are raised among these tales. Students will be encouraged to think comparatively and critically about tales and groups of tales. Particular emphasis will be placed on Chaucer’s use of the following genres: fabliau, Virgin Martyr stories, hagiography, romance, philosophical treatise, historiography, animal fable, sermon and Ovidian parable. Students will also be encouraged to speculate on the way in which the poem relates to and interprets England, and England’s place in the literary cultures of western Europe, of the later fourteenth century.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2581
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This course will examine the idea of utopia within the context of ten key twentieth-century texts, beginning with Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland (1915) and concluding with Peter Weir’s The Truman Show (1998). Themes to be discussed include technology and ideology, power, gender and utopia, subjectivity and the (post) modern subject, and geographical spaces.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2582
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module studies the canonical second-generation Romantic poets, Keats, Byron and Shelley, together with some of their lesser-known contemporaries, who were tremendously popular in their day but have since fallen into relative critical neglect, namely, the Welsh-identified poet Felicia Hemans, the Irish poet Thomas Moore, and the English ‘peasant’ poet, John Clare.  Students will develop an ability to draw associations between individual works and the movement known as second-generation Romanticism, exploring Romantic aesthetics, the creative imagination, eroticism, and song.  We will also pay close attention to poetic form and metre.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2583
    LevelL6
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    This module looks at the different ways the topics of love and death are handled in Renaissance texts before looking at a number of plays on marriage.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE2584
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module will explore selected novels and short fiction by women writing in Britain, France and America in the 1920s and 1930s.  Focusing on a diverse range of texts, it will examine the various ways in which women writers negotiated the momentous social, cultural and political changes that characterised the interwar period. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which women writers experiment with narrative form as part of a broader exploration of gender and sexual identities in the interwar years. The module will consider the texts in relation to modernist aesthetics, the emergence of the ‘modern woman’, ‘middlebrow’ culture, the city, work, fashion, eroticism, feminist politics, psychoanalysis, expatriate experience and the formation of literary communities

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2589
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this course is to introduce students to developments in Victorian tales of horror, published between the 1830s and 1920s, in a range of forms from short stories to novels. Students will focus on key concepts relating to the historical contexts and the conventions of genre. There will also be opportunities to consider screen and other adaptations of Victorian gothic fiction.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2595
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module introduces students to a range of texts set in, or dealing with, different periods of the historical past and of the future, primarily in Britain. These include works in several genres: historical novels, alternative histories, time-travel and timeslip fantasies, and dystopian future visions. The module considers the various ways in which such texts and the genres of which they are examples engage with history, with particular attention to the ways that they mediate between the periods being represented and those when the texts are produced and read, in terms of ideology, accuracy and authenticity, memory, and the “narrativization” of history.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2596
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Medical Fictions considers the long history and present positions of the multiple relationships between literature, medicine and society. Drawing on novels and medical writing, as well as drama, poetry, and television, the module investigates literary representations of medicine and medical cultures in order to evaluate the position of medicine in society. The module takes what is known as a medical humanities approach: bringing together different disciplines to offer new insights into the worlds of medicine in the past and present and to do so with an ethical sensitivity to the subject matters under discussion. Across the module, and via different literary texts, we will study anatomy and dissection, seizure conditions, vivisection, cancer, neuroscience, forensics, and the corpse. Reading and interrogating these topics means an engagement with both literary writing and medical writing, which will be given similar and equal attention. An underlying question will inform every topic studied: what role does literature play in our health and wellbeing?

    Assessment

    • Presentation: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSE2599
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module will explore the generic and thematic possibilities of Middle English romances – narratives of knightly adventure, combat, quests, and love. The module will address some key themes in medieval literature through a selection of verse and prose romances, including Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur, King Horn, Emaré, Sir Isumbras, and The Squire of Low Degree. The focus will embrace matters of identity – chivalry, gender, monstrosity – as well as marvels and the supernatural, friendship, love, ethics, and heroism. The texts will be read closely in relation to their literary, social and historical contexts.

    This is a course suitable both for students who have never studied medieval literature and also for those who already have some familiarity with Middle English. The texts will be read in the original Middle English.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2604
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module examines a range of literary works written during or immediately before or after the London Blitz. It focuses on how various writers (poets, dramatists, and novelists) responded to that experience of threat, uncertainty, and assault. Many of these works explore the relationship between identity, individual experience, and the local, social, and/or national community. They also explore experience from different social perspectives and in varying tones and genres, from the thriller paranoia of Greene to the retroactive farce of Waugh, from the class-conscious pathos of Hamilton to the search for renewal and reconciliation in Eliot and Macaulay. Where some focus on immediate experience in London and its suburbs, others engage with the reality of the Blitz from a self-consciously distanced or fractured perspective. This module will explore this variety of representation and response through a close attention to style, genre, theme, and social and historical context.  

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2605
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module provides students with the unique opportunity to work and study with a range of archival resources and poetic manuscripts related to the First World War. The module will consider diverse sources from wartime: Cardiff University student newspapers, mud splattered poetry manuscripts, soldiers diaries and so on. We will think about the literary world in which First World War poets wrote so that we can examine the progression of writing in the manuscripts from conventions of Edwardian poetry to the visceral and difficult poetry we now associate with trench poets. The module will progress to consider the legacies of such poetry. We will learn how to read the materiality of the manuscript page and understand how the work-in-process can illuminate the published text. The module will use both online digital manuscripts and Cardiff University’s own rich archives. Students will debate key questions that affect our understanding of literary manuscripts, challenging the notion of poetic ‘genius’.

    We will start with the archive of Cardiff’s student newspapers and how they engaged with and reported the First World War as it unfolded. The module will move on to think through the effect of material writing conditions on the poetry produced during the war, particularly focusing on the manuscripts of Edward Thomas. We will consider the evolution of what we understand as ‘war poetry’ by reading the drafts of T.S. Eliot’s modernist poem The Waste Land. Exploring these drafts will also allow us to discuss the idea of collaborative composition and how this affects our understanding of creativity. Lastly we will consider the manuscripts of the war poetry of Ted Hughes written in the late 1950s-1970s as he wrestles with the war of his father’s generation and its aftermaths. At the centre of the module is an engagement with the papers of Edward Thomas held in Cardiff University Special Collections.

    Students will have the opportunity to create a group video project using artifacts from the archive as part of their assessment.

    Assessment

    • Presentation: 25%
    • Written assessment: 75%
    Module codeSE2606
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module will explore some of the key figures in experimental and avant-garde American poetry (including Beat and New York School poets, projectivism, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E writing, conceptual poetry, cyberpoetry/Flarf) in relation to their poetic heritage of the modernist traditions of Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens and Gertrude Stein. Emphasis will be on the close reading of texts in conjunction with the historical and contemporary poetic contexts; on the growing interrelation between twentieth-century American writing of poetry and more critical essays on poetics by its practitioners; and on the changing relationships between poetry, politics and society, including with respect to gender, race and sexuality.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2607
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    Early modern drama can often be read in terms of personal identity politics: how people construct their identity in terms of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, rank, and religion. Historians have also increasingly become interested in how individuals in the period understood themselves in relation to their working life. This module combines this focus on the construction of identity in drama and on the idea of work in the age of Shakespeare and his immediate contemporaries. It examines how working life is represented in some early modern drama, contextualising it by reference to other historical sources.

    This module studies the plays of nine early modern dramatists (Beaumont, Chapman, Dekker, Heywood, Jonson, Marston, Middleton, Rowley, and Shakespeare) that present language being used in work and about work. The plays focus on a range of jobs at the time – including those of  trader, minister, wife, artisan, apprentice, merchant, scholar, maid and man servant, whore, and soldier. The module combines a historicist literary critical approach with close attention to dramatic structure, imagery, language, and dramatic devices.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2608
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The aims of this module are to introduce students to the major literary works of John Milton (1608-1674), and to develop students’ understanding of the literary and historical contexts in which these texts were produced. Paradise Lost is generally agreed to be one of the greatest works in the English language; however, Milton wrote many other significant works, and this module will explore a representative range of pieces from his early poems and drama, to his late, great epic. While a significant amount of teaching time will be spent introducing contextual issues, the module will also utilise a range of secondary critical works to model formal analyses.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE2609
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module provides a survey of the American short story from the early 19th century to the present day. The Irish writer Frank O’Connor once remarked that ‘the Americans have handled the short story so wonderfully that one can say that it is a national art form’. The module will chart the development of the American short story more or less chronologically as an intersection of literary form and national identity. The short story is a form that lends itself to idiosyncrasy and experimentation, and each generation of American writers has attempted to expand the boundaries of the form while simultaneously returning to a set of abiding concerns. Some of the themes we will be covering include: wilderness and isolation, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, war and historical experience. The stories we will be reading span a range of styles from social realism to Gothic and the ‘weird tale’. The module will enable students to acquire a critically informed appreciation of how this stylistic and thematic diversity is grounded in the persistence of the ‘American idea’.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE4101
    LevelL4
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    Through careful study of classic philosophical debates, such as those concerning the extent of human knowledge, free will and determinism, the existence of God, personal identity, and what it is to have a mind, we will consider fundamental questions about the nature of human existence and our relation to the rest of reality. We will isolate and discuss the argument structures and philosophical assumptions employed in these debates. Students will develop their skills of analysing texts, reconstructing arguments, and developing their own critiques of those arguments. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students will find any existing knowledge significantly broadened, deepened, and challenged by our emphasis on reading original contributions to debates rather than explanations of those debates.

    Assessment

    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4103
    LevelL4
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    Through careful study of recent philosophical arguments on such moral and political issues as euthanasia, abortion, the treatment of animals, moral objectivity, gender roles and relations, the nature of justice, capital punishment, and free speech, we will isolate and discuss the argument structures and philosophical assumptions made in these debates. Students will develop their skills of analysing texts, reconstructing arguments, and developing their own critiques of those arguments. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students will find any existing knowledge significantly broadened, deepened, and challenged by our emphasis on reading original contributions to debates rather than explanations of those debates.

    Assessment

    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4104
    LevelL4
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    Through careful study of four great texts, we will isolate and discuss the argument structures and philosophical assumptions that are developed in four great texts from different periods in the history of philosophy. Students will develop their skills of analysing texts, reconstructing arguments, and developing their own critiques of those arguments. No prior knowledge of philosophy is required. Students will find any existing knowledge significantly broadened, deepened, and challenged by our emphasis on reading the contributions to debates rather than explanations of those debates.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 25%
    • Written assessment: 25%
    • Written assessment: 25%
    • Written assessment: 25%
    Module codeSE4105
    LevelL4
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    Mae'r modiwl hwn yn darparu cyflwyniad i athroniaeth ar gyfer myfyrwyr cyfrwng Cymraeg, drwy ymdriniaeth fanwl o destunau clasurol, a gweithiau athronwyr adnabyddus o Gymru. Y prif nodau yw cyflwyno'r myfyrwyr i rai o feddylwyr a themâu allweddol athroniaeth orllewinol, er mwyn iddynt ymgyfarwyddo gyda darllen a dadansoddi athroniaeth, ac i wneud hynny drwy ddarllen agos o destunau athronyddol sylfaenol (a'r mwyafrif o rheini wedi eu hysgrifennu neu gyfieithu i'r Gymraeg). Y testun cyntaf fydd y llyfr Ffiniau (Myfyrdodau Athronyddol ar Lenyddiaeth) gan yr athronydd Cymreig, DZ Phillips, wedi ei leoli o fewn un o'r ysgolion athronyddol pwysicaf yr 20fed ganrif, sef athroniaeth Wittgenstein. Yr ail destun bydd Cariad at ein Gwlad gan athronydd Cymreig mawr y 18ed ganrif, Richard Price. Mae ei waith yn cyffwrdd ar rhai o brif ddadleuon athronyddol cyfnod yr Ymoleuo. Y Gorgias, un o ddeialogau athronyddol Platon sydd yn trafod themâu megis rhinwedd, cyfiawnder, grym gwleidyddol a natur gwirionedd, bydd y trydydd testun. Barddoneg Aristoteles, a ystyrir hyd heddiw yn destun sylfaenol ar elfennau trasiedi, bydd y pedwaredd testun. Y pumed testun, a’r olaf, bydd Myfyrdodau Descartes, testun hollbwysig yn athroniaeth Orllewinol, sydd yn ymdrîn a seiliau gwybodaeth  

     

    This module provides an introduction to philosophy for Welsh-medium students, through a close engagement with classic texts, and the works of well-known Welsh philosophers. The main aims are to introduce the students to some of the key thinkers and key themes of western philosophy, to familiarize them with reading and analyzing philosophy, and to do so through the close reading of primary philosophical texts (a majority of those being written in or translated into Welsh). The module will begin with the book Ffiniau (Philosophical Reflections on Literature) by the Welsh philosopher, D.Z. Phillips, whose oeuvre sits within one of the most important schools of 20th Century thought – that of Wittgenstein’s philosophy. The second major text will be Cariad at ein Gwlad (Discourse on the Love of our Country) by the 18th century Welsh philosopher Richard Price, whose writings illustrate some of the key philosophical debates of the Enlightenment. The third text will be the Gorgias, one of Plato’s philosophical dialogues, which discusses and questions themes such as justice, virtue, political power and truth. The fourth text will be Aristotles’ Poetics, which is still regarded today as a canonical analysis of tragedy and its various elements. The fifth and final text will be Descartes’ Meditations, a seminal text in Western philosophy in which he reflects on the foundations of knowledge.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 80%
    • Written assessment: 20%
    Module codeSE4106
    LevelL4
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    Nod y modiwl yw cyflwyno myfyrwyr i rai o'r cwestiynau allweddol yn athroniaeth foesol a gwleidyddol. Bydd yn archwilio themâu amrywiol, o natur ddynol, cyfiawnder, a natur moesoldeb, i bryderon mwy diweddar gyda materion megis rhywedd a thlodi byd-eang. Bydd y pynciau yn cael eu cyflwyno trwy waith rhai o'r athronwyr allweddol yn y canon traddodiadol, gan gynnwys Platon a Hobbes, a Marx a Rawls, a thrwy hynny cynnig i’r myfyrwyr dealltwriaeth o hanes athroniaeth y gorllewin. I'r perwyl hwn, yn ogystal â mynd i'r afael â chwestiynau athronyddol penodol, bydd y modiwl yn anelu at dynnu sylw at ddilyniannau a rhwygiadau yn y meddwl gorllewinol, a natur barhaus cwestiynau penodol am fodolaeth ddynol.

    Bydd y modiwl yn dechrau gyda thrafodaeth o driniaeth Platon o gyfiawnder a chysyniad Aristoteles o'r bywyd da. Yna bydd syniadau am natur ddynol, cymdeithas a llywodraeth yn cael eu harchwilio yn nhraddodiad y ‘cytundeb cymdeithasol,’ er enghraifft yng ngwaith Hobbes, Locke a Rousseau. Mae'r modiwl yn symud ymlaen i drafod rhai cwestiynau sylfaenol ym moeseg, gan gyflwyno ymateb Price i sgeptigaeth Hume, ac yna’n trafod damcaniaeth llesyddol Bentham a Mill a’i feirniaid. Yna bydd y modiwl yn ystyried beirniadaeth radical Nietzsche o foeseg Iddewig-Gristnogol modern, cyn troi yn fras at themâu o dlodi, anghyfiawnder ac iwtopia, gan ddechrau gydag Owen a Marx. Bydd sylw yn cael ei roi i faterion sydd weithiau yn cael eu hesgeuluso gan athroniaeth wleidyddol brif ffrwd megis amlddiwyllianedd a hawliau lleiafrifol, ac yn arbennig, materion rhyw a ffeministiaeth. Bydd y modiwl yn cloi trwy ystyried dau safbwynt dylanwadol diweddar ar gyfiawnder, sef damcaniaeth cyfiawnder fel tegwch Rawls a moeseg disgwrs Habermas.

     

    The aim of the module is to introduce students to some of the key questions of moral and political philosophy.  It will explore various themes, from human nature, justice, and the nature of morality, to more recent concerns with issues such as gender and global poverty.  These subjects will be introduced in the main through the work of some of the key philosophers in the canon, from Plato and Hobbes to Marx and Rawls, thereby informing the students with a sense of the history of western philosophy.  To this end, in addition to addressing specific philosophical questions, the module will aim to highlight continuities and ruptures in western thought, and the enduring nature of certain questions of human existence. 

    The module will begin with a discussion of Plato’s treatment of justice and Aristotle’s concept of the good life.  Ideas of human nature, society and government will then be explored through modern contractarian thought, for example the work of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. The module moves on to discuss some foundational questions of moral thought, introducing Price’s response to Hume’s scepticism, and then to Bentham and Mill’s utilitarianism and its critics. The module then considers Nietzsche’s radical critique of Judaeo-Christian morality, before outlining the themes of poverty, injustice and utopia, starting with the work of Owen and Marx. Attention will be given to issues sometimes overlooked by mainstream political philosophy such as multiculturalism and minority rights, and in particular, gender issues and feminism. The module concludes by focusing on two influential recent approaches to justice, namely Rawls’ theory of justice as fairness and Habermas’ discourse ethics.    

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    Module codeSE4107
    LevelL4
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    This module will provide a thorough grounding in methods of argumentation. It will cover different types of arguments and how to challenge them, how to identify common argumentative fallacies, how to write critical essays and present your ideas in an academic context, and introduce basic logic.

    Assessment

    • Class test: 30%
    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Examination - spring semester: 40%
    Module codeSE4312
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This course explores fundamental topics within philosophy of science. It aims at providing a critical approach to the scientific method that will be accessible to undergraduate students from both the humanities and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) disciplines. Its goal is to familiarize students with problems and controversies within the practice of science, provide a clear understanding of its limits and allow future scientists to develop a balanced understanding of their disciplines.

     

    Normally we take scientific knowledge to amount to indubitable knowledge, but can this popular view of science withstand philosophical reflection? Specifically, does scientific knowledge amount to proven knowledge and if not how is scientific knowledge justified? Does science follow the inductive method or does it rely on what Popper called ‘falsificationism’? How can we tell scientific and pseudo-scientific theories apart? For example, what are the reasons for preferring evolutionary biology over creationism? Moreover, is scientific progress cumulative and continuous (where each new theory adds to the existing body of scientific knowledge) or is it interrupted and revolutionary? Is scientific knowledge absolute or relativistic, and can we be realists about the claims science makes? Finally, what is the relation between scientific theories and scientific models?

     

    No prior knowledge of science is required, but readings will sometimes engage with scientific work.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    Module codeSE4313
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to some of the general views of the mind that have been advanced over the last 100 years in seeking to resolve the mind-body problem. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    Module codeSE4358
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The module will offer an introduction to the main contemporary philosophical theories of reference, meaning and truth.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    Module codeSE4363
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Global politics at the beginning of the twenty first century may be seen to involve conflicts between different political philosophies, as well as raising important issues that political and moral philosophers need to address.  This module will introduce students to those political philosophies and political philosophers that are most relevant to understanding contemporary political debate, and for developing a critical understanding of contemporary political events and issues.  The modules will engage with contemporary liberalism and neo-conservativism, as well as Marxist, post-modernism and republican thought. 

    This module aims to allow students to explore contemporary political events in the light of relevant philosophical arguments, and to recognise the relevance of those arguments to the understanding and critical assessment of those events.

    Assessment

    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4364
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this module is to investigate and understand some essential topics of metaphysics as discussed by modern analytical philosophers.

    Metaphysics is one of the three central and pervasive themes of philosophy (the others being epistemology and ethics) — knowledge of which is required for a comprehensive understanding of any philosophical topic.

    In Metaphysics we study the most fundamental questions that can be asked about reality. What is the nature of reality? Is it material or mental or both? Are the most fundamental entities particular objects or are there also properties? Or perhaps the fundamental entities are just facts, and objects and properties are similarities among facts. Are there only concrete objects, such as cabbages and kings and quarks and photons, or are there abstract objects as well, objects such as numbers? What is it that determines the identity of entities? For example, when we have a statue made of wax do we have just one object present or are there two, the lump of wax and the statue.  Arguments can be given both ways. What is it that determines identity across time and through change? Suppose all the timber of a ship is replaced over 25 years and we collect all the pieces replaced and build another ship with them. Which is the original ship? And what about the identity of persons?  Are you the same person you were 10 years ago, and if you are, what is it that makes you the same you despite all the changes you have undergone? Things could have been different from how they actually are—this text could have been in blue, but what about reality makes that the case? Are there other worlds where those possibilities are actual, but then, why should some blue text in another world explain why this text could have been blue? Concrete reality has a history: things change over time and apparently they change because one thing causes another. When one billiard ball strikes another and the second moves off it appears as if the first made the second move, but what is that making. We see the motions but look as closely as we will, we do not see the making, so perhaps there is no such thing as causing apart from our expectation of regularity. Yet the entirety of science is built on the assumption of causal laws: if causation doesn’t exist explanation and prediction make no sense and confirmation of laws by empirical investigation is an illusion. In this module we will study all these problems as discussed by modern analytical philosophers

    Assessment

    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4367
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this module is to investigate and understand the central questions of metaethics.

    In Metaethics we study the philosophical issues that lie behind or are presupposed by normative ethics (which is that part of ethics covered by the second year module, Contemporary Ethical Theory). For example, when someone says ‘stealing is wrong’ they are making a normative ethical claim, but when they follow it up by saying ‘but that is just my opinion, I wouldn’t want to impose it on anyone else’ they have shifted to taking a position in metaethics, a position that morality is merely a matter of opinion rather than a matter of fact. And of course, we can wonder whether that is right. The second year module on moral philosophy spent some time on deontology versus consequentialism, and behind that debate lies another metaethical question: whether moral requirements are requirements of rationality, requirements that any rational agent is committed to simply in virtue of being a rational agent or whether they depend instead on our preferences or attitudes.

    More broadly, metaethics is concerned with the questions of what is it for something to be good or bad, right or wrong, what ought or ought not to be done; whether moral properties are objective features of the world, and if so, whether they are natural or non-natural features, or whether they depend on the attitudes or responses or rational willing of subjects; whether moral discourse is truth apt or whether its semantics must be given in other terms; whether moral judgements are cognitive or non-cognitive states and whether they are necessarily motivating.

    Assessment

    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4372
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Who are you? And why do you behave like that? This module is concerned with some philosophical issues faced by anyone attempting to answer those questions, such as: the nature and existence of character traits like courage, honesty, and integrity; the difference between intended, intentional, and unintentional actions; the role of desire in action and the difference between desires that are yours and desires that aren’t; whether it is really true that people fsee the world differently and why; how pleasure features in our motivations and how it should; how it is possible to do what you know you shouldn’t.

    Although these issues are central to moral philosophy, they are themselves issues in the philosophy of mind and philosophy of psychology. Hence the module title. There will be very few lectures for this module. Lectures will only introduce each major topic. The rest of the module will be spent in seminars, two per week for each student, discussing excerpts from classic philosophy texts such as Aristotle and Mill or recent philosophy articles. We will also look at some classic psychology experiments.

    The module aims to give students a thorough understanding of a range of debates in contemporary moral psychology, including an understanding of classic philosophical treatments of the issues and classic psychology experiments pertaining to them, and to equip students to argue for and against positions in current debates on these topics.

    Assessment

    • Examination - autumn semester: 100%
    Module codeSE4379
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this module is to introduce you to the problem of consciousness and some of the main solutions.

    The module aims are as follows:

    • To develop students’ reasoning skills: to enable them to construct, present and justify arguments.
    • To make students fully cognisant of the central issues and texts in the consciousness literature in philosophy.

    Assessment

    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4385
    LevelL6
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits20

    A dissertation provides the opportunity for a thorough, detailed and critical philosophical study of a particular author, theory, problem or issue in which the student has an especially strong interest.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSE4386
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module engages with important contributions to philosophy from feminist philosophers, addressing issues that concern the positions of women in society. Topics covered include: pornography, feminine appearance; marriage; sexual violence; men in feminism and feminist epistemology

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 90%
    • Practical-based assessment: 10%
    Module codeSE4388
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The module aims to give students a critical understanding of some of the main theories and debates in contemporary philosophical ethics.

    Ethical enquiry addresses a number of related questions, including: ‘How should one live?’, ‘What is a good life?’, ‘What should we do if self-interest and morality conflict?’, ‘What actions are morally right and wrong?’, ‘What duties do we have to others?’. Ethical theories attempt to provide answers to such questions, and to justify these answers in a rigorous and systematic way. The module examines some of the main theories and debates in contemporary philosophical ethics––but it also considers various sceptical views about seeking a theory for ethics.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    Module codeSE4394
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    Mae'r modiwl yn galluogi myfyrwyr - sydd â diddordeb yn y broblem o dlodi byd-eang a’r ddelfryd o gyfiawnder byd-eang - i gaffael gwybodaeth arbenigol am nifer o ddamcaniaethau ar annatblygiad, trafodaethau polisi, a dadleuon athronyddol yngl?n â phwysigrwydd a'r rheidrwydd moesol o roi cymorth i'r anghenus pell. Fe ddylai’r modiwl apelio at unrhyw un sydd â diddordeb yn y broblem o dlodi byd-eang, gwleidyddiaeth y trydydd byd neu athroniaeth wleidyddol.

    Mae'r modiwl yn anelu at ddatblygu dealltwriaeth fyfyrwyr o athroniaeth gyfoes gydag astudiaeth o’r modd y mae’r byd cyntaf yn ymdrin â’r trydydd byd. Y bwriad yw eu cymell i ystyried o’r newydd eu hagweddau craidd at y byd annatblygedig, a’r modd y dylem ni yn y byd datblygedig mynd i’r afael a’r problemau yno. Erbyn diwedd y modiwl fe ddylai’r myfyrwyr meddu ar y gallu i drafod agweddau ymarferol datblygiad mewn modd dadansoddol, a mynegi eu safbwyntiau athronyddol a normadol ar y pwnc yng nghyd-destun syniadau athronwyr cyfoes.

    This module provides the opportunity for students, interested in the problem of global poverty and the ideal of global justice, to develop their knowledge of a number of theories of underdevelopment, policy debates and philosophical arguments regarding the importance and moral obligation to provide aid and support for the distant needy.  It should appeal to anyone who has an interest in the politics of the Third World or political philosophy.

    The module aims to develop students’ understanding of contemporary philosophy through studying how the first world responds to the problems of the third world.  The intention is to encourage reflection on basic attitudes towards the developing world, and the way that we in the first world should respond to the difficulties it faces. By the end of the module students should have the ability to discuss practical aspects of development in a reflective manner, and express their philosophical and normative ideas in the context of contemporary theories.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 20%
    • Written assessment: 80%
    Module codeSE4395
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    Nod y cwrs yma yw cyflwyno myfyrwyr i rai o brif destunau hanes damcaniaeth wleidyddol, gyda’r bwriad o’u dehongli a’u dadansoddi’n feirniadol. Fe wneir hyn yn y lle cyntaf trwy astudiaeth athronwyr clasurol allweddol, a rhai o’r cewri modern, gan ganolbwyntio ar agweddau penodol o’u gwaith. Fe fydd cyfle yn ogystal i fyfyrio ar ideolegau modern sydd yn gwneud defnydd o syniadau o’r testunau yma, megis rhyddfrydiaeth, cenedlaetholdeb, ceidwadaeth, a sosialaeth.

    Mae'r modiwl yma'n darparu cyflwyniad i hanes meddwl gwleidyddol, cynnig dadansoddiad manwl o rai syniadau craidd sydd wedi bod yn arbennig o ddylanwadol, yn ogystal ag adlewyrchu ar waddol y syniadau yma yn ein gwleidyddiaeth heddiw. Fe fydd y modiwl yn cynnig amlinelliad o ddatblygiad meddwl gwleidyddol yn y gorllewin o’r Groegiaid ymlaen, gan ganolbwyntio ar themâu megis cyfiawnder, natur ddynol, y cytundeb cymdeithasol a chrefydd. Lle bo’n briodol, fe fydd ffocws ar Gymry megis Richard Price a Robert Owen sydd wedi bod yn ganolog i’r datblygiadau yma. Ceir cyfle i adlewyrchu ar y gwahaniaeth rhwng athroniaeth wleidyddol ac ideoleg, a pha themâu pwysig sy’n parhau i ddylanwadu heddiw, neu wedi cael eu gwrthod gan dueddiadau gwleidyddol ac athronyddol yr 20fed ganrif.

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to some of the major texts in the history of political thought, and encourage them to interpret and critically analyse key concepts.  In the first instance, the classical thinkers will be studied, as well as some of the giants of modern political thought, with an emphasis on specific themes and ideas within their work.  There will also be an opportunity to reflect on modern ideologies that make use of these ideas, such as conservatism, liberalism, nationalism and socialism.

    The module provides an introduction to the history of political thought, a thorough analysis of some key concepts that have been particularly influential, as well as reflecting on their legacy in today’s politics. It will also provide an outline of the development of political thought in the West, from the Greeks onwards, focusing on themes such as justice, human nature, the social contract. freedom and religion. Where appropriate, there will be a focus on Welsh figures such as Richard Price and Robert Owen who have been influential in some of these developments. There will be an opportunity to reflect on the differences between political theory and ideology, and on which themes continue to influence us today, or have been rejected by the political and philosophical trends of the 20th century.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 10%
    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 60%
    Module codeSE4396
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Ceir yn y modiwl yma ddau brif fwriad sy’n mynd law yn llaw. Y cyntaf yw cyflwyno myfyrwyr i rai o brif feddylwyr a mudiadau athronyddol yr 20fed ganrif, gan astudio a dehongli eu prif egwyddorion. Yr ail yw edrych ar sut y derbyniwyd a dehonglwyd yr athroniaethau yma gan feddylwyr yng Nghymru. Nod pellach i’r modiwl yw galluogi’r myfyrwyr i ddadansoddi a chloriannu os, neu ym mha ffyrdd, y mae athroniaeth yr 20fed ganrif wedi ei chymhwyso at y cyd-destun Cymreig. 

    Mae’r modiwl yma’n trafod a dadansoddi sawl ysgol orllewinol o feddwl athroniaeth ers troad yr 20fed ganrif gan gynnwys delfrydiaeth Brydeinig, athroniaeth Wittgensteinaidd a dirfodaeth. Fe fydd myfyrwyr yn derbyn cyflwyniad cyffredinol i’r athroniaethau yma ac yn canolbwyntio ar rai o’r prif feddylwyr, yn ogystal ag astudio’r athronwyr ‘Cymreig’ sydd wedi bod yn lladmeryddion iddynt, neu wedi cymhwyso rhai o’r prif syniadau i’w priod bynciau eu hunain - megis crefydd a chenedlaetholdeb. Ceir cyfle hefyd i ystyried syniadaeth gyfredol megis ôl-foderniaeth ac ôl-wladychiaeth a’u harwyddocâd i ni’r Cymry cyfoes. Fe fydd gan fyfyrwyr felly’r cyfle unigryw o astudio rhai o’r syniadau mwyaf dylanwadol yn hanes diweddar y gorllewin wrth ystyried yn ogystal eu dylanwad ar y meddwl Cymreig.

    There are two main aims to this module. The first is to introduce students to some of the key thinkers and philosophical schools of the 20th Century, through the study and analysis of their most well known ideas.  The second is to look at how these philosophies were received and interpreted by thinkers here in Wales.

    Specifically, the module discusses and analyzes three western schools of philosophical thought: British Idealism, Wittgensteinian philosophy and existentialism. Students will receive a general introduction to these philosophies and will focus on some of the main thinkers in these traditions, in addition to studying the ‘Welsh’ philosophers who have promoted them, or adapted their key ideas to their subjects of choice – such as religion and nationalism. There will also be an opportunity to consider some more recent schools of thought, such as post-modernism and post-colonialism, and their relevance to contemporary Wales. Students will therefore have the unique chance to study some of the most influential ideas in recent Western thought, whilst considering in addition their implications for intellectual history in Wales.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 20%
    • Written assessment: 80%
    Module codeSE4398
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module will provide a critical overview of contemporary theory of knowledge, focusing in particular on social epistemology. This includes analysis of: the value of knowledge; knowledge gained via testimony; the concepts of belief, knowledge and justification in individual and group contexts; and the relationship between virtue epistemology and the extended cognition thesis.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 40%
    • Written assessment: 60%
    Module codeSE4400
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Cyflwyniad i syniadau rhai o ffigyrau mwyaf adnabyddus yn hanes Cymru yw hanfod y modiwl hwn.  Mae’n cynnig i fyfyrwyr wybodaeth arbenigol o rai o’u hegwyddorion a chysyniadau craidd.  Dadansoddir yr athroniaethau mewn cyd-destun rhyngwladol, gan ystyried eu cysylltiadau gyda digwyddiadau ac argoelion deallusol ehangach yr oes.

    Bwriad y modiwl yw trafod a dadansoddi syniadau cynhenid Cymreig sydd ag agweddau gwleidyddol, athronyddol ac ysbrydol - a’u perthynas gyda’r byd tu hwnt i Glawdd Offa.  Fe geir hefyd gyfle i ystyried y cyffelybiaethau a gwahaniaethau sydd yn bodoli rhwng y gwahanol athroniaethau a chyfnodau o dan sylw, a gofyn a yw credoau’r Cymry ar hyd yr oesau yn atseinio yn ein gwleidyddiaeth a chymdeithas heddiw. Fe ystyrir syniadau rhai o unigolion enwocaf Cymru dros gyfnod maith - o’r bumed ganrif hyd heddiw.

    This module provides an introduction to some of the most well-known figures in Welsh history, offering the chance to develop an understanding of their key ideas and principles. Their philosophies and doctrines are analyzed in an international context, reflecting on the connections with the events and intellectual trends of their eras.

    The main objective of this module is to debate and analyse ideas deriving from a Welsh context, which have political, philosophical or religious elements – and to consider their relation to the world beyond Offa’s Dyke. There will be the opportunity to consider the similarities and differences between the different philosophies and historical periods under scrutiny, as well as a chance to reflect on the extent to which these ideas echo in the politics and society of contemporary Wales. We will consider some of the most famous ‘Welsh’ figures over a vast period – from the fifth century until today.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 10%
    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 60%
    Module codeSE4402
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    The module will explore key issues in aesthetics and the philosophy of art by reviewing the responses that philosophers, artists and art critics have made to modernist works of art. The module will be structured through a chronological review of modernist art, primarily focusing on the visual arts (including painting, sculpture and photography) in the Western tradition, but also exploring non-Western responses to modernism, and contemporary art forms (such as video gaming).  The module will critically examine the thought of continental and analytic philosophers, including Kant, Hegel, the Frankfurt School, Heidegger and the phenomenologists, Bell, Collingwood and Danto.

    This double module aims to give students an understanding of modernist art, its relationship to philosophy, and the role that philosophy and art criticism play in the interpretation and development of art.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 60%
    • Presentation: 40%
    Module codeSE4405
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module studies the origins and development of Greek and Roman philosophy from the earliest ‘pre-Socratic’ thinkers, in the 6th century BCE, through to Roman thinkers of the first century CE. We cover the beginnings of Greek critical philosophical thinking, Socrates and Plato, Aristotle, and the great philosophical schools of the Hellenistic and Roman periods.

     

    Throughout the module students will learn to read and critically engage with primary texts from this period, drawing on secondary scholarship to supplement their own interpretations. Areas explored will include (but are not limited to) metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, and religion. 

    Assessment

    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4406
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The module will explore the development of Continental Philosophy, from the 18th century Rationalists through to 20th and 21st century philosophers such as Heidegger and Deleuze.  After outlining the 18th century origin of Kant's philosophy, the first part of the module will focus on  Kant, Hegel and Nietzsche.  The second part of the module will explore key 20th century philosophers, including phenomenologists, such as Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, the Frankfurt School, and later French philosophers, such as Derrida and Deleuze.   The model will aim to explore what is distinctive about continental approaches to philosophy, in contrast to the more Anglophone analytic approach, and to draw out the key issues, themes and methods that characterise Continental Philosophy.

    This double module aims to give students an understanding of the overaching development of Continental Philosophy, while allowing them to focus in more detail upon particular philosophers and issues, according to their personal interests.

    Assessment

    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE4407
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module explores methods for the acquisition of justified belief in contemporary Western epistemological communities which are highly specialised and in which much information transmission is technologically driven. We shall endeavour to answer questions such as: when should we trust experts? How do rumours spread? What is a conspiracy theory? Is Facebook making me more biased? Can google be a source of understanding?

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    Module codeSE4408
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This research-led module will explore a number of topics related to the pragmatics of language use and the nature of communication within contemporary philosophy of language. Topics may include code models of communication, speech act theory, Gricean and neo-Gricean accounts of communication, and Wittgenstein’s concept of a language game.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 40%
    • Written assessment: 60%
    Module codeSE4409
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Epistemic notions such as knowledge, justification or evidence figure prominently both in philosophical theorizing and in our everyday evaluations of each other’s actions, assertions and beliefs. It often comes natural to say things like ‘Why would you believe such a thing? You have no evidence for it!’, or challenge other people’s assertions by questions like ‘How do you know that this is the case?’.

     

    In the last decades, there has been a surge of interest in the epistemological literature in the question regarding what, if any, epistemic normative constraints govern certain actions or mental states. This course investigates contributions to the debate on a variety of levels. That is to say, it aims to shed light on:

    (i) Foundational issues: Are there epistemic norms governing our habits of belief-formation, assertion and action?  If yes, what is their structure and what is the source of their authority?

    (ii) Issues pertaining to the relations/interactions the epistemic norms in question might have with each other and/or other types of normative constraints: Does it make sense to have different epistemic norms governing action, assertion and belief, or should we assume commonality? How do these epistemic norms interact with other normative requirements, like, for instance, prudential or moral constraints?

    (iii) Topics related to the impact of the results in research on epistemic normativity on other debates in epistemology: how various epistemic norms put forth in the literature help to shed light on central epistemological issues like the internalism-externalism debate about epistemic justification or the invariantism-contextualism debate about knowledge attribution.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
    Module codeSE4410
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    How intimate is the relation between cognition and technology? Despite modern society’s permeating use of digital technologies such as smartphones, tablets, smart watches and, soon, augmented reality systems, the division between man and machine is hardly ever questioned. Technologies are peripheral hardware components to be used by central cognitive processors, standardly identified with biological brains. This view is known as cognitive internalism and holds that cognition is bound by the brain/central nervous system (CNS) of biological agents. However, recent advances within philosophy of mind and cognitive science, inspired by the work of phenomenologists such as Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, challenge this internalist assumption. Evidence suggests that no part of the brain is always in operation, acting as the final chooser of conscious action. Moreover, cognition appears to be largely shaped not just by our brain/CNS but by our bodies as well. This is known as the hypothesis of embodied cognition, according to which our bodies play a constitutive—and not merely a peripheral—role to cognitive processing. This is an interesting hypothesis in its own right, but being receptive to it also opens up the possibility of genuine man-machine hybrid intelligence. If cognition is not restricted to neuronal activity but extends to biological instruments such as eyes and hands, then, under the appropriate conditions, cognition may also extend to non-biological instruments such as smartphones, augmented reality systems or even pen and paper when we solve complex mathematical problems. Known as the hypothesis of extended cognition, this view holds that biological as well artificial hardware can play a constitutive role to cognitive processing, while denying that neural and non-neural tools need a central operator. Cognition, instead, is just “tools all the way down.” Moreover, at the far end of this coordinated challenge to cognitive internalism, there lies the hypothesis of distributed cognition. According to this hypothesis, cognitive processing may not just be embodied and extended. Instead, when team members collaborate densely, as in the case of several scientific research teams, cognition may be distributed between all contributors along with their artifacts. Drawing on knowledge acquired from previous modules such as ‘Mind, Thought and Reality’ and ‘Philosophy of Mind’, this 3rd year course will critically examine the above approaches to cognition and assess their input to debates concerning the ethics of tool-use. It will also examine their role to modern educational practices, the design of digital technologies and online socio-technical systems such as Wikipedia.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    Module codeSE5306
    LevelL6
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    thought from early works, such as The Birth of Tragedy, to the mature works of the late 1880s, e.g. On the Genealogy of Morality, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist. It studies key aspects of his thought (such as his diagnosis of cultural nihilism, his work on morality, the development of a power theory and the relationship between psychology and philosophy).  In addition, the module explores Nietzsche’s importance for understanding selected contemporary issues in philosophy (e.g. politics, subjectivity, consciousness and selfhood).  The module will be taught by a combination of lectures and seminars.

    Assessment

    • Examination - spring semester: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSE6251
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits60

    A detailed module description is not available as this module represents a study abroad option.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSE6253
    LevelL6
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits40

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET002
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module in Forensic Linguistics is only available to those who have completed SET032 Forensic Linguistics.  The module deals with the role of the linguist in language reform, as an expert witness on linguistic issues and as an activist in the legal process. The module will include the analysis of a range of legal texts designed for the layperson, such as jury instructions and the caution to suspects, both evaluating the success of attempts to improve their comprehensibility, and producing alternative formulations. We will then consider the role of the linguist as an expert witness and discuss some of the areas in which forensic linguists have provided evidence, such as disputed authorship, speech crimes, the linguistic identification of nationality and trademarks.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 25%
    • Written assessment: 75%
    Module codeSET003
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The focus of this module is on understanding grammar as a resource which is available to speakers for making meaning. Students will be introduced to a functional approach to grammar, and in particular Systemic Functional Grammar, as the course provides a descriptive overview of the main grammatical systems of English at clause and group rank.  Students will acquire skills in analysing text and develop skill in using functional descriptions to analyse the meanings that can be identified in texts.

    The aim of this module is to introduce you to a way of looking at the grammar of English from a functional, rather than purely a formal, perspective. We shall focus, therefore, on the question: ‘how is the grammar of English organised for the expression of the functions and meanings that it serves?’ The theoretical framework for our investigation is Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG), associated primarily with the British linguist M.A.K Halliday. The module will explore the grammar of English from the perspective of ‘language as meaning potential’, where meaning is understood in terms of the three strands of meaning: the experiential (e.g. how does language represent experience?), interpersonal (e.g. how is language used for social interaction and personal action?) and textual (e.g. how is language organised as text?). The course will provide an overview of the main grammatical systems of English, together with a functional description of grammatical units such as the clause and the nominal group.  The functionally-oriented understanding of English grammar that you will develop in this module will enable you to describe and analyse the grammar of a variety of texts.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSET005
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    The aim of this module is to explore theoretical and conceptual frameworks underlying social interaction from a discourse analytic perspective, as well as to examine systematically and in context-specific ways both spoken, written, and digital data in real-life everyday and institutional settings. This module builds on an elementary knowledge of discourse and pragmatics, so students without such prior knowledge are required to audit the undergraduate module SE1362 `Discourse'.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 90%
    • Presentation: 10%
    Module codeSET012
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module provides an introduction to qualitative research methods as used in the study of language and communication. Students will gain access to and experience of a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to qualitative research, and will be familiarised with case study illustrations of the process of qualitative research, from planning and data gathering to analysis and interpretation of data.

    Aims

    To familiarise students with the aims, potentials and achievements of qualitative analysis of communicative interaction in a range of social contexts. To equip students to explore all phases of qualitative research in sociolinguistics, conversation analysis and discourse analysis. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 30%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    Module codeSET013
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module provides an introduction to quantitative methods in linguistics. Students will learn the basics of a quantitative approach to linguistic data, including how to organise and display data and how to conduct some common analyses using the statistics software ‘R’. The module also provides students with the knowledge to explore more advanced procedures independently and gives them a framework for interpreting and assessing quantitative research methods and results as reported in scholarly publications.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSET015
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    To develop independent research and writing skills to produce a dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET015
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    To develop independent research and writing skills to produce a dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET026
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module relates the functional analysis of texts to wider issues and concepts in sociolinguistic and discourse studies. The module explores the relationship between the features of the context as a linguistic construct and the social environment in which it is produced.  The relationship between quantitative and qualitative data is explored and mixed methodologies employed to ask how individual texts function in context and how discourses evolve over time and space. Students will produce case studies in areas of interest to them and the module is designed to be applicable within diverse fields including critical studies, education, forensic linguistics, environmental issues, management studies and the media. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSET028
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module explores a range of theoretical models and practical approaches in second language acquisition, development and pedagogy.  It guides the student through an examination of the main concepts and issues in language learning and language teaching research and practice. The course covers acquisition processes and individual differences that affect language learning in and out of the classroom. We consider, and critically evaluate, published research in this area.

    Aims

    To familiarise students with the main theories and models of second language acquisition and development, and the ways in which these relate to language pedagogy. To develop the students’ understanding of key issues in language learning and teaching, and to support the critical evaluation of research related to language acquisition.

    To guide the student in carrying out a small-scale piece of research on language learning or teaching.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET030
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module is taken by all MA and PhD students in the Centre for Language and Communication Research. It lays the foundation for the two key activities of postgraduate study: interpreting the research of others, and designing and executing effective research of one's own. In support of these twin objectives, a particular emphasis is the development of skills in critical reading and self-critical writing. Critical reading makes it possible to transcend simply accepting and describing research papers and books, in favour of comparing and evaluating them. Self-critical writing entails anticipating the expectations of other critical readers (including the required practices of research design) and raising one's performance to meet them. Many of the skills covered are generic, and will continue to be useful in a range of future careers. The module also includes training in accessing electronic research materials.

    The module aims to offer the basic transferable skills required for successful postgraduate study, through the medium of substantive topics relevant to the students’ own specialisms and interests in various fields of Language and Communication Research, including Linguistics, Applied Linguistics or Forensic Linguistics. The skills and understanding developed in this module are intended to be directly applicable to all of the other modules undertaken during the students’ studies, and they should underpin the design and execution of their essays and MA dissertation or PhD thesis as appropriate.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 25%
    • Written assessment: 75%
    Module codeSET031
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module is only available to, and is compulsory for, students taking the MA in Language and Linguistics.  It provides students of language and linguistics with an opportunity to participate in a small-scale research project normally in an area of study separate from that covered by the dissertation. In this module, students take both a practical and reflective approach to research in language and linguistics. The module begins with discussion of projects available and the focussed research skills their completion will entail. The second and main part of the module is devoted to a self-guided small-group research project which is conducted largely by independent study with support from the module convenor and a member of staff who will act as project lead for a group. Students will work together in a small research team in order to get a sense of the experience of working collaboratively although they will be assessed on their own work. At the end of the module, students will have developed clear and specific research skills which will help them to conduct larger scale studies and independent research in the field. This module does not constitute a ‘mini dissertation’, as it is based on developing an awareness of the issues and skills necessary for carrying out research in language and linguistics, through practical experience, rather than only producing a final and complete piece of research.

    Research Experience will usually be based on existing staff research in order that students have the opportunity to experience real research and to gain work experience in a research environment. Occasionally students may elect to design their own project and they will be supported, in a small group, in the same way as students on a staff-derived project. Through the means detailed above, each student will make a small but significant contribution to one or more aspects of a current research project in the Centre for Language and Communication Research or an equivalent project. Because of the nature of ongoing research, the tasks vary and should offer some choice to students to focus on a topic and activity that interests them. Students may find themselves doing one or more of the following: reviewing literature, collecting data, transcribing data, analysing data, interpreting findings in the context of theory. The activities on offer differ from year to year, and the list of possibilities is compiled on the basis of suggestions from staff members, who will supervise the student(s) assigned to their work. Students will have five hours of consultation with their supervisor during the module, which will involve identifying research goals and discussing the progress of the work as well as any training deemed necessary.

    Aims

    • To introduce students to aspects of research in language and linguistics such as the ethics of carrying out such research and the sensitivity of data of various forms;
    • To enable students to have a clear understanding of potential sources of data, as well as the pitfalls and problems with its collection, transcription and anonymisation;
    • To provide students with the necessary skills to conduct a thorough literature review within a focused area of language and linguistics and to produce a coherent and comprehensive synthesis of this literature;
    • To allow students to begin a small-scale research study within an area of interest within language and linguistics;
    • to equip students to reflect on all aspects of the research process;
    • To develop new skills in research;
    • To gain experience in working with an experienced researcher on a specific project.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 15%
    • Written assessment: 55%
    • Presentation: 30%
    Module codeSET032
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    This module in forensic linguistics investigates issues concerning the use of language in the legal process. We shall begin with the nature of legal language and then investigate language use in police interviews and in court. We shall focus on language disadvantage before the law. We shall also be visiting Cardiff Crown Court, where you will have the opportunity to carry out ethnographic observation of courtroom proceedings and report back your findings in class.

    Aims

    The module aims to develop your awareness of key linguistic concerns relating to the use of language in the legal process.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 25%
    • Written assessment: 75%
    Module codeSET033
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits20

    Phonology is the study of the pronunciation system of a language and embraces its words, its grammar and its discourse features. It also relates to orthography, but a sharp theoretical and practical distinction is maintained between written and spoken language. Phonology is an essential component of any kind of study of spoken language, whether theoretical, descriptive, comparative, historical or applied.

    Aims

    The module combines descriptive and practical dimensions of the phonology of English and thus prepares students to apply phonological awareness in a wide range of professions, including language teaching, literacy, speech therapy, forensic analysis, sociolinguistic surveys and communication studies.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 50%
    Module codeSET034
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module is only available to, and is compulsory for, students taking the MA in Language and Communication Research. Each student will make a small but significant contribution to one or more aspects of a current research project in CLCR. Because of the nature of ongoing research, the tasks vary and should offer some choice to students to focus on a topic and activity that interests them. Students may find themselves doing one or more of the following: reviewing literature, collecting data, transcribing data, analysing data, interpreting findings in the context of theory. The activities on offer differ from year to year, and the list of possibilities is compiled on the basis of suggestions from staff members, who will supervise the student(s) assigned to their work. Students will have five hours of consultation with their supervisor during the module, which will involve identifying research goals and discussing the progress of the work as well as any training deemed necessary.

    Aims

    To apply in a practical context one or more of the skills developed in the core modules of the MA programme.

    To develop new skills in research

    To gain experience in working closely with an experienced researcher on a specific project

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 15%
    • Written assessment: 55%
    • Presentation: 30%
    Module codeSET035
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits20

    This module provides students in forensic linguistics with an opportunity to participate in a small-scale research project normally in an area of study separate from that covered by the dissertation. In this module, students take a reflective approach to research in forensic linguistics, producing a final report on the process of carrying out research within the field. The module begins with discussion of focused research skills within the field. The second and main part of the module is devoted to a self-guided research project which is conducted largely by independent study with support from the module convenor and other appropriate staff. Students will work together in a small research team in order to get a sense of the experience of working collaboratively although they will be assessed on their own work. At the end of the module, students will have developed clear and specific research skills which will enable them to conduct larger scale studies and independent research in the field. It should be noted that this module does not constitute a ‘mini dissertation’, as it is based on developing an awareness of the issues and skills necessary for carrying out research in forensic linguistics, rather than producing a final and complete piece of research.

    Aims

    • To introduce students to aspects of research in forensic linguistics such as the ethics of carrying out such research and the sensitivity of data within the field;
    • To enable students to have a clear understanding of potential sources of data, as well as the pitfalls and problems with its collection, transcription and anonymisation;
    • To provide students with the necessary skills to conduct a thorough literature review within a focused area of forensic linguistics and to produce a coherent and comprehensive synthesis of this literature;
    • To allow students to begin a small-scale research study within an area of interest within forensic linguistics and to reflect on the process.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 15%
    • Written assessment: 55%
    • Presentation: 30%
    Module codeSET200
    LevelL7
    SemesterDouble Semester
    Credits60

    A workshop-based module where students review and discuss their work in progress. The purpose of the workshops is twofold: to provide specialist instruction in the craft of writing, and to enable students to produce a portfolio of examples of their creative work in process. The first portfolio is submitted in April; tutorial supervision will then continue until the end of June in preparation for the second portfolio.

    This module constitutes the creative meeting point of the MA course. It involves substantial attendance hours and requires active participation by students. It thus serves as a place for students to exchange ideas and opinions in a dynamic and supportive atmosphere, to review and discuss aspects of their own work in a positive and encouraging manner, as well as allowing more general discussion of the theory and practice of writing. The course involves participation in workshops across two semesters.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET201
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    This module, which represents the expression of students’ best work, consists of a body of creative writing and a reflective critical commentary. The portfolio should contain a substantial piece of creative work as well as provide evidence that the student has engaged with and progressed in their understanding of the creative process.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET201
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    This module, which represents the expression of students’ best work, consists of a body of creative writing and a reflective critical commentary. The portfolio should contain a substantial piece of creative work as well as provide evidence that the student has engaged with and progressed in their understanding of the creative process.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET203
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    The module in teaching creative writing is a distinctive feature of the Cardiff MA. As a consequence of this emphasis on creative writing pedagogy, our graduates should be well equipped to apply for various teaching positions in the field (or for positions in editing and publishing where clearly articulated, formative feedback is required).

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET204
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    In this module students will be asked to think reflectively and critically about ideas of creativity and research in the practice of writing: specifically, they will regard this module as an extended critical commentary on creative work by other writers but they may also refer to their writing where appropriate. They will be expected to develop their critical awareness by discussing set texts and by engaging with ideas such as subjectivity and the role of the author. Students should be prepared to approach this module with a high degree of intellectual rigour.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET209
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    The myth of King Arthur has been rewritten, reshaped and reinscribed for centuries. Always recorded in culturally sophisticated forms, from Latin history to prose romance cycle, the story of Arthur speaks directly to the powerful about the nature of the power they wield. Over time the nature of that power shifted: in clerical, Latinate Welsh writings, Arthur appeared as a heroic champion of a Christian people waging war against pagan invaders; for the elite of post-Conquest England he was remodelled as an avatar of Anglo-Norman military might; for the French aristocracy of the twelfth century he became a roi fainéant, or “do-nothing king”; and the for medieval English, whose kings consciously modelled their own military leadership on Arthurian lines, he largely remained a historical figure, ripe for ideological manipulation.

    Later, the Arthurian story entered a culturally fallow period, with myth unable to extend its ideological reach into the proto-capitalist, early bourgeois state. While the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries remained in contact with the old British story, it was often in the cultural underworld of popular ballad and antiquarianism; and though the Romantics would revive British interest in the Arthurian story, it was located on the peripheries of English culture, though nationalistically prominent in Wales and Scotland. It was not until Tennyson began publishing his Idylls of the King from 1859 that the Arthur of the modern Britons – or at least “ever-broadening England” – would achieve the cultural dominance that it exercised in the later Middle Ages.

    The surveys major representations of the Arthurian tradition from the re-emergence of the Arthurian as a major cultural monument in the early nineteenth century. Taking a broadly historicist, and cultural materialist, approach, it identifies the variations that authors have made to the tradition and relates those variations to their context – both literary and socio-economic. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET211
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    The module is concerned with some of the meanings that are generated by the Renaissance theatre in its concern with violent death and looks at a range of plays under a series of broad headings, including God and death, the subject and suicide, murder and women, killing the king, the staging of death. Central to the course is the question of the relationship between violence, authority, the subject, the state and the family, but other issues, including punishment, ghosts, graves and funerals, will be discussed.  

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET220
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    This module is concerned with some of the critical and theoretical problems involved in the editing of Shakespeare's texts, including the relationship between the plays and their sources. Attention will focus on the differences between the 1623 Folio and modern editions, especially the Oxford Shakespeare, as well on the variety of Shakespeare texts - quarto, Variorum editions, New Arden.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET230
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    This module allows students to undertake independent research and writing, on a topic within the subject area of English literature, with the guidance of a supervisor.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET230
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    This module allows students to undertake independent research and writing, on a topic within the subject area of English literature, with the guidance of a supervisor.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET238
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    This module focuses on neo-Victorian metanarrativity. Metafiction ‘self-consciously and systematically draws attention to its status as an artefact in order to pose questions about the relationship between fiction and reality’ (Waugh 1984: 2). Neo-Victorianism’s imaginative (re)turn to the Victorian past enacts and simultaneously undercuts its performance of texual illusionism. Neo-Victorian texts revisit, in fictional form, the Victorians in the post-Victorian and contemporary periods. This may involve reconstructing versions of (nineteenth-century and) Victorian real-life personalities, rewriting Victorian novels, or re-imagining Victorian culture. Neo-Victorianism is self-referential, engaging the reader in a game about its historical veracity and (inter)textuality, and inviting reflections on its metatextual playfulness. If metafiction, as Patricia Waugh notes, calls attention to its counterfeit status, then neo-Victorian or, in Linda Hutcheon’s (1989) terms, historiographic metafiction stages its artefactual condition in order to challenge our desire for ‘reality’ and ‘truth’, dramatizing the essential constructedness of history and historiography. This module examines the metanarrative strategies, thematic preoccupations (with desire, deviance and sexuality) and sub-genres (magic realism, biofiction, crime and detective fiction, historiographic metafiction, romance) of neo-Victorian fiction and film from its postmodern inception in the 1960s through the 1980s/1990s to contemporary 21st-century configurations. 

    On successful completion of the module students will be able to: identify, conceptualise and analyse neo-Victorianism in its dual engagement with Victorian and contemporary (postmodern) models of metanarrativity; demonstrate an informed understanding of the development of neo-Victorianism from the 1960s through the 1980s/90s to the 21st century; critically assess the diversity of neo-Victorian fiction and film and evaluate the multiplicity of genres embraced; show familiarity with a range of critical and theoretical approaches to the subject and be able to apply some of these to the analysis of selected texts; synthesise independent research and develop critical arguments in oral and (typographically, grammatically and stylistically accurate) written form.

    The Learning Outcomes will be achieved by means of classroom discussion, an oral presentation (supported by a handout) and an essay.

    Assessment

    • Presentation: 20%
    • Written assessment: 70%
    • Presentation: 10%
    Module codeSET248
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    This module will survey the ways in which legendary or pseudo-historical heroes and villains – such as Launcelot, Arthur and Guinevere, Oedipus, Hector of Troy, Criseyde, Mordred, Lear and Cordelia – have been reimagined and exploited in late medieval and early modern English literature. It will also examine how real historical figures – such as Henry V, Richard III, and Elizabeth I – were portrayed as heroes and/or villains, often in explicit relation to the legendary figures. Considering poetry, prose, and drama, this module addresses the two-way (and often ambiguous) relationship between fiction and history; it interrogates the politics of romance and the poetics of history. Through attention to cultural and historical contexts, this module will explore the ‘uses’ of the past and of its heroes and villains for constructions of identity – political, personal, social, and national. It will also consider how ideas of periodization, of a divide between ‘medieval’ and ‘Renaissance’ or ‘early modern’, have influenced critics’ views of literature and selfhood. In these ways and others, ‘heroes’ and ‘villains’ will emerge more complex and contested than they may at first appear. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET249
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    This module takes as its starting point an interrogation of the spectral status of femininity as something that, like the ghost, is ‘non-existent’ but ‘nonetheless appears’ (Terry Castle, 1993). Ghosts, phantoms, apparitions and revenants are the lifeblood of Gothic writing, with ‘femininity’ proving to be particularly susceptible to ‘spectralisation’. Bringing into view the troubling movements of wraithlike women, this module will explore a selection of Gothic texts where ghostly representations and narrative effects make present experiences of social invisibility and historical dispossession, as well as anxieties about the visibility of new models of femininity emerging in the twentieth century and beyond. It will pay particular attention to the spectral aspects of subjectivity (in relation to gender, sexuality, race and class), as well as the psychic, temporal, spatial and memorial dimensions of haunting and ghostliness. Focusing primarily on prose fiction by women writers, the module will also explore theoretical articulations of spectrality in work by Sigmund Freud, Hélène Cixous, Jacques Derrida, Terry Castle and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, amongst others.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET250
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    Journeys have been a central trope in literature and art for many centuries. Yet it is only comparatively recently that the literature of travel has come to be studied as a genre in its own right. One of the reasons for this may be that as a genre it is unstable and can take a bewildering – and exciting – variety of forms, ranging from letters, essays, journals, autobiography and sketches to fiction. Travel writing has a myriad forms, then, and it also transports us to a myriad places. In so doing, it dramatizes encounters between the self and the other, between cultures and languages, between past and present, and creates an imaginary map of the world out there for the sedentary reader. In recent years there has been an upsurge of interest in literary travel writing, especially narratives about pedestrian journeys through a landscape. This module will offer an opportunity to analyse a range of such twentieth-century and contemporary travel narratives, to think about the characteristics of the genre, and about its development and place in literary history. 

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 25%
    • Written assessment: 75%
    Module codeSET258
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    Writing Victorian Science considers the place of literature in the representation and reception of nineteenth-century scientific knowledge. The module is robustly interdisciplinary: as much time is given to reading works of science (professional, public, and personal) as to novels, short fiction and poetry. Reflecting that balance, the module focuses on four case studies drawn from science and medicine (evolution, epilepsy, infectious disease, and astronomy) that depict specific moments of conflict or debate. Each study examines the positions occupied by different narratives and asks wider questions of the social, cultural and political implications of science in all its written representations. A concern with debate – and specifically the multiple debates on the two cultures of literature and science – is one of the module’s defining characteristics. Students will not only be encouraged to investigate the debates in question but will also be given the opportunity to revisit them creatively in their assessments.

    Assessment

    • Presentation: 10%
    • Written assessment: 90%
    Module codeSET265
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    Project Management and Research focuses on developing postgraduate research skills, by embedding them within various projects and initiatives based in Cardiff’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research (CEIR). Students will gain training in project management, digital scholarship and transferrable skills while contributing to various research projects running within CEIR.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 50%
    • Written assessment: 10%
    • Written assessment: 40%
    Module codeSET266
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    During the Romantic period, the idea of the ‘nation’ came under intense scrutiny in British literature and culture. Radical ideas about revolutionary fraternité that knew no borders clashed with reactionary impulses to define British nationhood in opposition to the French, Irish, ‘Oriental’ or Catholic outsider – and to erase or quash differences within its borders. Political upheavals, violent conflicts, domestic disruptions and colonial expansion motivated writers to ask: What is the nation? Who is qualified to be a citizen? Who must be excluded? What sort of community defines ‘us’ and how might ‘we’ imagine it? During this period, technological transformations and expansion of the literary marketplace meant that literary forms such as the novel, the pamphlet and the periodical became more widely available to a mass readership than ever before. These forms thus proved crucial in the multifaceted project of ‘imagining the nation’.

    This module examines the key prose genres that dominated the Romantic period, with a close eye on three thematic clusters: gender, politics and history. Students will benefit from access to the scholarly resources and research activities made available by the Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth Seminar (CRECS), the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research (CEIR) and Cardiff University’s Special Collections and Archives (SCOLAR).

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET270
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    This module approaches Charlotte Brontë’s writing from a postcolonial critical perspective and is centrally concerned with the interactions between discourses of slavery, race and nation, on the one hand and the questions of gender and class that permeate her oeuvre, on the other. As well as analysing Brontë’s four best-known novels—The Professor, Jane Eyre, Shirley and Villette—the module directs attention to less familiar and critically neglected texts, including the so-called juvenilia (1829-39), the poetry, the Belgian essays of the early 1840s and the fragmentary Emma, barely begun at the time of Brontë’s death in 1855. Throughout the module, emphasis is placed on the patterns of continuity, revision and transformation that exist between the earlier and later phases of Brontë’s literary career.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET271
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    On this module we will read the materiality of the manuscript page and theorise how the work-in-process can illuminate the published text. We can restore the materiality of paper and ink to the poems, read their histories, the stories that they tell of their composition and the intellectual and creative environments in which they were gestated, born and matured. This module will have two underlying critical strands: 1) archival/manuscript study, which engages with material culture and the production of archives. 2) Genetic criticism, which takes elements from post structuralism to come to an understanding of the genesis and evolution of manuscript drafts. We will also consider the theories and histories of creativity from a variety of sources to contextualize the discourses of inspiration and creativity in which the authors are embedded. Students will explore Cardiff University’s own rich Edward Thomas archives, manuscripts and reproductions of papers based in local and international archives. The module aims to provide you with the specialized skills required to read the manuscript page alongside an understanding of critical theory relating to manuscripts and histories of creativity and inspiration. It will equip you to undertake your own archival research projects as part of the module and beyond. The module content covers the poetry of Emily Dickinson, Edward Thomas, Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET272
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    The aim of this course is to acquaint students with some of the foundational texts that have influenced and shaped both literary studies and the discipline of ‘Critical and Cultural Theory’ in the last 40 years. The module will provide students with a historical introduction to some of the key texts of what came to be known as ‘Theory’. It will discuss the contexts from which they arose, and their critical and cultural reception. The module presents a basis for further study in Critical and Cultural Theory, Literary Studies, and for historical work on the origins and emergence of Theory as a discipline. No prior knowledge of the field is assumed, although teaching will be pitched at a level commensurate with intellectual expectations in postgraduate studies.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET273
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    In early modern drama, kings are sometimes called upon to rely on a particular skill set: they must assess a rapidly changing situation and change it by their words, which can variously plan, report, inspire, argue, test, persuade, summarise, instruct, and perform. This module takes a specifically presentist approach to Shakespeare. It examines the decisions and words of the leaders at the centre of each play, often as they make hard calls and attempt to bring their people onside. Taking a less traditionally literary approach to experiencing Shakespeare's plays, the module asks students to identify themselves rhetorically with these leaders. The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, Olivier Mythodrama, and the Royal National Theatre today offer leadership training for heads of industry, civil service, and politics that look equally at how these plays present issues of leadership and how theatricality itself can be read through contemporary management theory. This module takes a similar approach.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET274
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    This module explores the richness and variety of Romantic poetic engagements with the idea and reality of ‘place’. Byron and Venice, Wordsworth and the Lake District, and Blake and London are frequently seen as emblematic of the relationship between art, poet, and place in the Romantic period.

    Embracing a range of poetry from the Romantic era, this module explores the complexity and diversity of literature and place, from the urban to the rural, from the ‘foreign’ to the national and regional. Through close readings of individual works, theorized discussions of ‘place’ and the artist, and explorations of Cardiff’s SCOLAR collections, the module also examines the relationship between Romantic poetry and travel, movement, cosmopolitanism, dislocation, and exile. In so doing, it exposes students to the diverse means by which that relationship initiates and reflects diverse social, philosophical, and aesthetic debates about dwelling and alienation, belonging and estrangement, the local and the global.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET275
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    On this module we will explore the manifold debates in Marxist theory after the collapse of the political project of actually existing socialism. Focusing on texts written since 1990, we will explore the different debates to which Marxism has contributed and continues to contribute, including the theorization of the world after the ‘end of history’, the constitution and critique of society, literary and cultural production, and the possibility of political transformation. Throughout the module we will pay particular attention to the implications of a range of theoretical texts for the ways in which we read both theory and literature. 

    Assessment

    • Portfolio: 100%
    Module codeSET400
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    This module is the culmination of the MA programmes in philosophy and allows the student to pursue in depth their particular philosophical interests in the light of their experience in the other modules of the MA. The module consists in researching and writing a dissertation in philosophy under the guidance of an academic supervisor. The dissertation may be on any philosophical topic chosen in consultation with the supervisor and the topic must be approved by the MA  Board and the external examiner.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET400
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    This module is the culmination of the MA programmes in philosophy and allows the student to pursue in depth their particular philosophical interests in the light of their experience in the other modules of the MA. The module consists in researching and writing a dissertation in philosophy under the guidance of an academic supervisor. The dissertation may be on any philosophical topic chosen in consultation with the supervisor and the topic must be approved by the MA  Board and the external examiner.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET418
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    To develop students’ reasoning skills: to enable them to construct, present and justify arguments.  To make students fully cognisant of some crucial feminist issues in contemporary philosophical theories.  To make students aware of a variety of philosophical positions and theories concerning feminism.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET428
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    The module aims to give students a critical understanding of some main positions, theories and/or debates in contemporary philosophical ethics. We can cover topics in normative ethics, metaethics and/or practical reason, examining either a monograph or themed articles. The precise content can vary across different years, so to reflect recent developments in the field and best enhance students’ understanding and engagement with the subject. The topic(s) will be decided by the module’s convener and students.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET429
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    A rigorous study of a set of interconnected issues central to contemporary academic debates in empirically-informed philosophical moral psychology.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET432
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    The module aims to allow student to explore the major trends within contemporary political and social philosophy, and to engage critically with them in terms of their relevance to understanding contemporary political problems (including issues such as democracy, terrorism, globalisation, and post-secular society).

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET437
    LevelL7
    SemesterSpring Semester
    Credits30

    To investigate and understand some essential topics in the philosophical study of rationality and normativity as discussed by modern analytical philosophers.

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET600
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    To develop independent research and writing skills in the student via a sustained piece of critical writing and appropriate research.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET600
    LevelL7
    SemesterDissertation Semester
    Credits60

    To develop independent research and writing skills in the student via a sustained piece of critical writing and appropriate research.

    Assessment

    • Dissertation: 100%
    Module codeSET614
    LevelL7
    SemesterAutumn Semester
    Credits30

    The primary aim of the module is to familiarise students with the most important contemporary responses from critical, cultural, and literary theorists to the ecological crisis. The module will proceed on the basis that this is a crisis of thought afflicting our social and cultural environment as much as a material crisis afflicting our natural one. Indeed, the very notion of a strictly natural environment is one which contemporary theorists are interrogating. As several of the texts on this module point out, the prefix ‘eco’ comes from the Greek word oikos, meaning home or household, and connotes not only the study of natural habitats (the ecological) but also the world of values and exchange (the economic). The module will thus encourage students to rethink, in the context of the current and future ecological emergency, the values we place on the ‘natural’ and the ‘environmental’ understood in their broadest senses. We will be engaging with a number of interdisciplinary sources along the way, from the philosophical to the scientific and from the political to the cinematic and the literary.    

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET700
    LevelL7
    SemesterYear
    Credits20

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%
    Module codeSET700
    LevelL7
    SemesterYear
    Credits20

    Assessment

    • Written assessment: 100%