Earth and Ocean Sciences

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences.

Module codeEA1201
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will introduce the students to the fundamentals of the structure and evolution of the Solid Earth including Plate Tectonic processes. This will start from the origin of elements and the formation of planet earth advancing to our understanding of its internal structure from a range of data types. It will then focus on providing an introduction to plate tectonics including a discussion of each significant type of plate boundary. It will end with a discussion of the rock cycle with a brief introduction to igneous and metamorphic rocks, and a brief comparison with other terrestrial planets, Venus and Mars.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
Module codeEA1203
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module examines how planet earth can be a dangerous place for human society.  It investigates the main types of hazard on Earth, their causes and consequences for the population.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
Module codeEA1204
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module introduces Geographical Information Systems (GIS) concepts and techniques; providing the basis to allow students to utilise GIS skills in other spatial modules and projects.  This includes teaching using leading GIS software, including extensions, tools and editing.  The module also provides students with knowledge and understanding of GIS theory and practice.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeEA1208
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module provides an introduction to the Earth’s natural resources, the processes by which they form, and their exploitation. The module will investigate how natural resources are formed and preserved within the Earth’s crust and on its surface. The methodologies of both mineral and hydrocarbon exploration, along with their evaluation and extraction will be outlined, and the importance of the sustainable exploitation of natural resources will be discussed. In addition, the present day make-up of the UK’s energy portfolio will be described with reference to historical/future energy trends, along with political and global pressures such as climate change issues.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA1209
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is for students to learn to describe and classify minerals and igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, and to give students an understanding of the fundamental processes that lead to the formation of these rocks. This includes classification of the major rock types, with examples of occurrences of each rock type worldwide. The module includes practical examination of the essential rock forming minerals and igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, both in hand specimen and in thin section using a petrological microscope.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA1210
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The shape of geology is 3D, though our usual view of it is two-dimensional, e.g., on road cuttings, satellite images or geological maps. This module teaches the skills of “reading” geological maps in terms of the three-dimensional structure, the geological history and the assessment of geological reserves.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 25%
  • Examination - spring semester: 75%
Module codeEA1211
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

An introduction to the history of life on Earth, as seen and interpreted from the fossil record. We will introduce the major groups of living and extinct organisms, and their patterns of origination, diversification (and extinction) over time. We will understand the way in which fossils are preserved and the limitations of the fossil record. We will study exceptional preservation. We will learn to use fossils as geological tools for stratigraphy, palaeogeography and palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. Practicals will enable basic identification, interpretation and analysis of fossil materials, and introduce skills for application in higher level modules.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA1212
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This first year unit uses the River Taff as an example to facilitate learning about chemistry in the environment. The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Understand the periodic table and its relevance for Earth Sciences
  2. Recognise how chemical concepts can be used to interpret and predict the behaviour of water
  3. Practise use of and conversion between relevant chemical units

A series of lectures will introduce the fundamentals of chemistry in the environment. Practical sessions will include field work, lab work and calculation workshops. Students will collect water samples from the River Taff and use these to apply the techniques learned in lectures and wider reading.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA1213
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module will develop the themes in ecology in the terrestrial and marine environments. It will explore the biology and diversity of life and will include basic systematics of selected groups. The fundamentals of ecosystem science will be introduced and methods of data collection and analysis will be presented.

Assessment

  • Portfolio: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA1214
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module will introduce concepts of sampling and sampling techniques. Students will gain an understanding of basic statistical properties of data. Probability, null hypothesis and fundamental statistical tests will be employed to enable the student to develop a strategy of statistical analysis.  Presentational aspects of statistical reporting will also be developed.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 50%
  • Practical-based assessment: 50%
Module codeEA1215
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module will provide an introduction to environmental science and policy, focusing on major issues of environmental change which demonstrate the interconnectedness of physical systems and human intervention. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, the module will explore how scientific evidence is used to support policy decisions through a series of case studies and will demonstrate the current status and challenges which science presents for policy makers and policy processes. The role of science communication in helping bridging the science-policy gap will be addressed.

Assessment

  • Report: 25%
  • Presentation: 25%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA1216
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Human societies depend on the natural environment for livelihoods and wellbeing. Environmental geography seeks to understand the relationship between humans and the environment. This class seeks to introduce some of the fundamental concepts of Environmental Geography through a global journey from the Arctic to the tropics. Through the class you will develop a qualitative and quantitative framework for assessing major global environmental issues, including permafrost melting, tropical deforestation, soil erosion and food security, and global geohazards.

Assessment

  • Portfolio: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA1217
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Despite over a century of dedicated research, the oceans remain largely under-explored. This module introduces the scientific principles involved in charting the oceans and other bodies of water. This module will explore the requirements for charting, the principles involved in hydrographic surveying, features of the Admiralty Navigation Chart and aspects of maritime safety.

Assessment

  • Report: 50%
  • Report: 50%
Module codeEA2101
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This 10 credit Year 2 module is designed to introduce students to the wide variety of site investigation techniques applied to the collection of field data including surveying and remote sensing.  The module also covers statistical techniques of data analysis and the skills required in report writing.

To prepare the student to undertake independent fieldwork, involving knowledge and understanding of:

  • Field sampling, measurement and recording techniques;
  • Desk study methods and assessment of data quality;
  • Remote sensing techniques and application.
  • Integration of field and literature data in the context of the regional settings;
  • Adherence to laboratory and field codes of conduct;
  • Statistical analytical techniques.
  • To be able to visualize information clearly and concisely by appropriate means.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeEA2107
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module investigates the wide variety of geophysical methods that are used to explore the sub-surface of the Earth, both in academic studies and for commercial natural resource exploration. Geophysical exploration methods will be related to the fundamental physical properties of natural Earth materials. The fundamental physical principles underlying each method will be discussed and the equipment employed. The suitability and limitations of methodologies to a wide variety of exploration targets will be evaluated. Techniques of geophysical data acquisition, processing and interpretation will be studied.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 35%
  • Report: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA2108
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Structural geology is the study of geological structures caused by deformation. This module focuses on describing and interpreting geological structures, and their integration into regional scale processes.

AIMS

  • To be able to describe the structures and geometry of deformed rock bodies
  • To understand how the geometry of deformed rock bodies is related to their evolution in three dimensions through time and space
  • To develop a simple understanding of the mechanics of rock deformation
  • To place structural observations and interpretations in tectonic context.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
Module codeEA2109
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The aim of this module is to understand the principles of plate tectonics and geodynamics through application of a broad variety of geological and geophysical techniques.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
Module codeEA2110
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This is a lecture-based module focussing on the chemistry of the Earth’s surface, the global element cycles and the driving chemical, physical, geological and biological processes. The module focuses on aquatic environments: Oceans, estuaries, lakes and rivers and the underlying sediments. 

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
Module codeEA2111
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This level two module provides an overview of metalliferous resources, building materials and industrial minerals. It examines ore deposit models, recognition of ores in hand specimen, economics of different commodities and briefly touches on evaluation of ores,mining methods and mineral processing.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
Module codeEA2112
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20
  • To provide students with a detailed knowledge of the processes involved in the ocean / atmosphere system.
  • Show how the laws of physics can be applied to the ocean and atmosphere.
  • Develop the ability to be able to interpret relevant charts and data.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeEA2113
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module covers the subject of geoecology, the interrelated fields of geoscience and ecology. The module will explore the main contributing components of pedology (soil science) and vegetational distribution (phytosociology), largely in a UK context. Important components include soil derivation, structure and chemistry, soil fertility, vegetational classification and measurement, and the effects of slope, altitude and aspect on soils and vegetational systems. The module has a strong emphasis on field application and training. The student will learn pedological and ecological field techniques and complimentary analytical and numerical skills.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA2114
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module covers the branch of applied sciences which deals with the measurement and description of the physical features of oceans, seas, coastal areas, lakes and rivers.  for the primary purpose of safety of navigation.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Report: 25%
  • Report: 50%
Module codeEA2116
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module addresses key aspects of pollution science, providing an overview and insight into the characteristics and impacts of a range of pollutants, including heavy metals, hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and radioactivity. The module covers the main principles of pollution science, illustrates pathways, transport, dispersion and behaviour of pollutants within a range of environmental media.  It also briefly explores the scientific basis of a selection of pollution control measures.

Module aims:

  • to equip students with an understanding of the main principles of pollution science
  • to provide an introduction to the characteristics and main impacts of a selection of pollutants
  • to illustrate pathways, transport, dispersion and behaviour of pollutants within a range of environmental media
  • to provide students with a  basic understanding of the scientific basis of pollution control

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Report: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA2124
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This Year Two module covers the fundamental areas of metamorphic petrology, focusing on controls on regional and contact metamorphism, deformation and metamorphism, geothermobarometry, radiometric age dating and meteorite impact rocks.It will provide the knowledge and understanding  to enable a greater appreciation of how tectonics and pressure have shaped, and continue to shape, the fabric of our planet.The practical aspects of this module will enable the development of such skills as: the petrographic identification,in both thin section and hand specimen, of common minerals found in metamorphic rocks; the graphical representation and interpretation of petrological data and the use of petrographic information to help elucidate tectonomagmatic processes.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeEA2125
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This Year 2 module covers the fundamental areas of igneous petrology,such as mineralogy, volcanology, geochemistry, volcanic hazards, magma chamber processes, mantle melting, and radiometric age dating.It will provide the knowledge and understanding to enable a greate r appreciation of how magmatism and volcanic processes have helped shape, and continue to shape, our planet. The practical aspects of this module will enable the development of such skills as: the petrographic identification, in both thin section and hand specimen, of common minerals found in igneous rocks;the graphical representation and interpretation of geochemical data and the use of petrographic information to help elucidate tectonic and magmatic processes.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA2130
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module advances on the GIS material taught in year 1; providing the basis to allow students to produce real-world GIS projects in other spatial modules and projects.  This includes teaching on using leading GIS software, including extensions, tools and editing.  The module also provides students with further knowledge and understanding of GIS theory and practice.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 75%
Module codeEA2135
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This double module investigates the processes of creation (weathering and soil control), transport and deposition of siliciclastic, volcaniclastic and carbonate sediments, their lithification, and the patterns of their expression in time and space (stratigraphy) and landscape (geomorphology). It is taught through lectures, practical classes and two day field trips. The course is examined by three assessed practicals and a final examination.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA2141
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Catchments collect, integrate, and route the water resources that humans depend on to live. The physical processes occurring in catchments are constantly reshaping these environments, and control the form of the landscapes around us. They influence our vulnerability to natural hazards, the distributions of natural habitats, and societal resilience to climate change.

Understanding how catchment systems operate is key to the work done by many Earth scientists, whether researching the effects of anthropogenic change on the global system, attempting remediation of damaged habitats, or guiding policy for environmental management. This module will describe the fundamental geomorphological and hydrological processes operating in catchments, and how these shape the natural environment. In particular, the module will highlight the ways these processes are likely to be impacted by global change.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA2210
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Palaeoecology studies the relationships between fossil biota and their physical, chemical and biological environments and how these can be extrapolated from the rock record. This module investigates those principles and methods employed in interpretation of the life habits of extinct organisms and in analysis of interactions in past communities and ecosystems. It explores the nature and veracity of the fossil record and the use of palaeoecological techniques for palaeoenvironmental interpretation. Studies of evolutionary palaeoecology follow the changing temporal relationships between organisms, their life habits and communities in response to the evolving biosphere and environment.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA2217
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The emphasis of this module is to introduce the student to the interaction between ecosystems and the biota within each ecosystem type, the adaptations and acclimations of fauna and flora to their environment and the interactions between taxa. Concepts of productivity, resource dependent control, trophic cascade, biodiversity and biomass, evolutionary adaptation, acclimation, ecosystem types, species succession and zonation, key species analysis, bioengineers, habitat and conservation quality will be covered.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA2218
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Over half of the world’s population live within 80 km of the coast. This highly dynamic setting is sensitive to environmental change and will undoubtedly respond to ongoing global shifts in climate. In order to successfully and sustainably manage our presence within coastal settings, we must have an understanding of how physical processes interact with the environment and how our coastlines evolve, thereby allowing us to make precise predictions of coastal response to environmental change. This module will provide an overview of the major physical processes responsible for shaping the coast.  Given the importance of understanding the effects of global change, we will explore the current coastal research being undertaken and how these physical processes will impact how we interact with the coast using recent case studies of coastal management.  

Assessment

  • Presentation: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA2222
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits30

This Field Skills section of this module teaches students transferable skills for research and field work in general, covering all aspects of the research and dissemination process from project design, development of methodology, implementation of methods, data acquisition and preliminary analysis, critical analysis of data, data interpretation, project dissemination orally and in a range of written forms.  The module uses field work at that start of the Autumn semester for workshop teaching of data analysis and dissemination. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Presentation: 10%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeEA3101
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This Year 3 optional single module covers the fundamental principles and methods used in igneous petrology through a study of: trace elements; isotopes and geochronology; ocean island basalts; continental flood basalts, oceanic plateaus, island arcs, active continental margins, mantle sources and phase diagrams.  It will also provide an overview of recent and current research literature.  The practical aspects of this module will enable the development of such skills as: the use of spreadsheets to manipulate, model and plot geochemical data, the use of geochemical and petrographic information to help elucidate magmatic processes.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
Module codeEA3103
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module is driven by the following question; How do climate and tectonics interact to create the world on which we live? We will use global examples to explore the range of processes that govern the distribution and creation of global landscapes.  The evolution of global landscapes has been discussed by geoscientists for over 100 years. We will journey through different landscape evolution theories and how they relate to modern geomorphic research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeEA3108
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module examines a range of applied topics in environmental geoscience and their impact on society. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Presentation: 5%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA3110
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module outlines the basis of environmental management, providing insight into the objectives and principles of current European and UK environmental policy and management practice.  It exposes students to a selection of traditional, regulatory instruments designed to protect environmental quality as well as presenting an overview and evaluation of a range of other evolving techniques and approaches to environmental management and stewardship. The role and application of science within environmental management and policy is demonstrated throughout the module.

Aims:

  • To provide an insight into the objectives, principles and development of European and UK environmental policy and management practice
  • To present an overview and evaluation of a selection of the most commonly used environmental management techniques
  • To introduce the student to the key characteristics of a selection of legal and economic instruments designed to protect environmental quality.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 10%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Report: 30%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeEA3114
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module provides a broad understanding of the development and objectives of Integrated Coastal Management (ICM), particularly within the context of European and UK experiences.  It discusses the most significant trends, current and future issues facing a selection of coastal and estuarine areas.  It describes and analyses the effectiveness of the most common institutional arrangements employed for managing coastal and estuarine areas and introduces a range of techniques commonly employed in ICM programmes.  Finally, an overview of the main components of coastal and estuary management programmes is provided, with particular reference to UK and US experiences.

Aims:

  • To outline the objectives and development of Integrated Coastal Management (ICM)
  • To provide a critical review of the common institutional arrangements for managing coastal areas
  • To evaluate the potential and application of a selected management techniques commonly employed in ICM programmes.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 10%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Report: 30%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeEA3117
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module provides an overview of surface and groundwater systems through an understanding of the hydrological cycle; the relationship between surface water resources, their management and control; the relationship between geology and aquifer properties and the occurrence of groundwater; the principles of groundwater flow, including flow to wells; water quality and contaminant hydrogeology; the sustainability of water supply.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 18%
  • Written assessment: 12%
Module codeEA3118
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will advance understanding of sedimentary processes and products and how these make up clastic and carbonate sedimentary environments and sequences. The module aims to develop critical thinking skills when applying stratigraphic and sediment provenance methods to modern and ancient outcrop and subsurface datasets, including boreholes and reflection seismic data. Case-studies will include shallow to deep marine settings where scientific drilling or hydrocarbon exploration occurs at present.

Assessment

  • Class test: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeEA3119
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This Year 3 module reviews the origins of sedimentary basins and the controls on the nature of their sedimentary fills, with emphasis on the factors influencing the formation and trapping of oil and gas. It introduces the techniques used in subsurface exploration and in the evaluation of hydrocarbons. The integrative nature of hydrocarbon exploration and evaluation is a major theme running throughout the course and students will appreciate the types of skills needed, and the challenges provided by careers in the oil and gas industry.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
Module codeEA3123
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will introduce students to Engineering Geology. This is a challenging module examined entirely though coursework that requires teamwork and self­ motivated learning to deliver work of professional quality.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 35%
  • Report: 50%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeEA3124
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This Year 3 double module provides an up-to-date overview of some of the main classes of ore deposit and the geological, physical and chemical processes that form them. It is in two, approximately equal, parts. The first (the ‘Ores’ part of the title) covers ore geology, petrology, exploration and evaluation, and includes a field excursion to the ore deposits of North and Central Wales. The second (the ‘Ore Genesis’ part of the title) covers the theory of ore-forming magmatic systems and the techniques needed to understand these systems, and includes a series of case studies on the genesis of some world-class ore deposits. 

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 25%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 25%
Module codeEA3127
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This is an advanced course in the acquisition, evaluation and interpretation of palaeobiological information, focusing on the origins and diversifications of major groups, the biology of extinct organisms, macroevolutionary patterns, and organism-environment interactions over geological timescales. We demonstrate the breadth and scope of palaeobiology in the Earth Sciences by examining selected topics at an advanced level. Within the course outline, specific content each year will reflect both the expertise and interests of the staff delivering it and topical and up to date advances and discoveries. The student will undertake field and practical work.

Assessment

  • Report: 15%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeEA3131
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This year 3 module will introduce mechanics into structural geology, establishing a sound theoretical basis for understanding the origin of the structures that were described in the second-year structural geology subject. Displacements, strain and stress will be presented in the framework of continuum mechanics, and integrated through a consideration of rheology.

The student will be trained in state-of-the-art analytical methods for the processing and interpretation of data collected from a variety of structural environments.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
  • Report: 20%
Module codeEA3132
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Aim of the module is to give an overview into the different ways microorganisms are involved in the global biogeochemical cycles, how they interact, and how they can use different chemical reactions for survival and growth. This knowledge will be used to understand applied aspects of environmental microbiology such as microbially induced corrosion, waste water treatment or bacteria used for the leaching of ores.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeEA3134
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module is designed to offer the non-law student an overview of the regulatory mechanisms in place for the protection of the environment. You will be introduced to the legal principles governing the protection of the environment and  examine the framework of national, European and international environmental laws regulating land use, nature conservation, environmental assessment, the pollution of water and air,  and the disposal of waste on land, amongst other. By the end of this module you should be able to identify the main regulatory instruments and approaches addressing a range of environmental issues and be familiarised and comfortable with legal concepts, liabilities and terminology.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 75%
  • Written assessment: 25%
Module codeEA3135
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The aim of this module is to provide a multidisciplinary synthetic view of the broad-scale geological processes that constitute elements of the Solid Earth cycle and to show how these processes may be constrained by examination of natural examples ancient and modern.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA3138
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

In this module students undertake an individual research investigation into an aspect of earth sciences. Students will learn how to design and execute a research programme, leading to a report and research presentation.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Presentation: 15%
  • Written assessment: 70%
Module codeEA3139
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

We all live in a hazardous world, where our daily well-being is under constant threat from natural and man-made disasters.  Geoenvironmental disasters worldwide such as mudslides, erupting volcanoes, and earthquakes are regular components of the daily news.  An increasing awareness of our local and regional environment means that less dramatic issues such re-using brownfield sites and protecting areas of natural beauty or scientific interest are assuming greater importance.  Constantly improving technologies and better scientific understanding has resulted in greatly improved risk assessment, monitoring, mitigation, and disaster planning. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA3145
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Coral reefs are a huge global resource, providing vital ecosystem services through fisheries, coastal protection, and tourism. Coral reefs are deteriorating as a result of modern environmental threats, specifically human influences. This 3rd year module provides an understanding of the biological, ecological, and physical characteristics of the coral reef environment. We will explore the biogeochemistry of coral reefs and the imposing land and marine based stresses. Using current case studies of reefs under threat we will examine emerging management and conservation tools and approaches.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
Module codeEA3146
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This third year unit in glaciology aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to:

  • Understand the physical processes which control glaciers and ice sheets
  • Appreciate the role of glaciers and ice sheets in the Earth’s system
  • Analyse and interpret glaciological datasets

A series of lectures will introduce the fundamentals of the science of glaciology, enable students to understand why and how datasets are collected, and practical sessions enable investigation of real datasets. 

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 75%
  • Practical-based assessment: 25%
Module codeEA3147
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module is designed to provide students with a detailed knowledge of how scientists reconstruct past variations in climate and use these reconstructions to learn about the climate system and how it works. Starting with an introduction to the climate system, the course will begin with the tools of the trade (climate archives, proxies, dating methods) and move on to records of orbital and millennial-scale climate variability and ultimately the recent changes associated with the rise of man. The course covers many complex topics and students will be expected to research and present.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeEA3148
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module explores the relationships of organismal evolution .and planetary environment. It assesses aspects of the early evolution of life and its interaction with the atmosphere and geosphere past and present. Prokaryote and Eukaryote specialisms are examined and the significance of microorganisms is emphasized.  The theory of evolution is explored with reference to both living and extinct biotas. Mechanisms of evolution are considered in relation to mass extinctions and past environments.  Methods of analysis of both past and present biodiversity are considered and conservat ion of existing biodiversity and ofthe global environment is assessed.  Gaia, creationism and the influence of humans within the biosphere will also be explored.  In ALL aspects of this module, student interaction will be welcomed, and discussion of topical issues arising from the synoptic nature of this module will form an important component.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
Module codeEA3209
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module involves a week-long field excursion that will examine the Environmental Geography issues associated with water use in a changing climate. This will involve investigating how communities and societies respond to the environmental challenges of water use, ecology, climate change, and the movement of pollutants and sediments through catchments. Students will focus on an Alpine catchment, where retreating glaciers provide the major source of water for drinking, power, and agriculture. Students will examine the pressures on water use given the potentially finite limitations on this resource.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeEA3214
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module uses the principles of isotope geochemistry to learn about Earth System Processes. The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Understand the formation processes of isotopes and their properties
  2. Use these properties to study geological processes relevant to the environment, paleoclimate, magmatic systems and ore genesis.
  3. Apprehend how isotope data can used to Infer the processes responsible for large scale evolution of the Earth and its surface through time

A series of lectures will introduce the fundamentals of isotope geochemistry. Practical sessions will include thematic exercises, induction to clean laboratory practices and isotope ratio measurements.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Report: 30%
Module codeEA3227
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Much of our understanding of the past behaviour of oceans, and the interaction of oceans with global climate, is derived from the study of marine microfossils - this understanding is key to placing modern environmental changes into context.  The object of this module is to explore the morphology and palaeoecology of the major microfossil groups that are used for past ocean and climate reconstructions, including how they are analysed as proxies for parameters such as sea surface temperatures, ocean pH, ocean circulation and sea ice extent.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA3233
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will focus on UK and international marine conservation issues and in particular will assess the quality and type of scientific data used to underpin conservation management and policy. The range of tools available for conservationists will be examined and knowledge and understanding of the fragility of the marine environment and the threats, whether natural or man induced, will be extended. The students will have the opportunity for discussion and debate on topical aspects of marine conservation.

Assessment

  • Report: 20%
  • Report: 30%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA3235
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module provides a study of the techniques involved in the effective exploration and monitoring of marine and coastal environments. During this module you will study aspects of geodesy and global navigation satellite systems, underwater positioning methods, advanced sonar systems, sub-bottom profiling and the measurement of offshore currents.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeEA4103
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

All aspects of contaminated land will be addressed in this module, including the chemical principles that underpin understanding and control of contaminants in the environment.

Part 1 of the module considers the assessment and the environmental effects of contaminated land. Methods of investigation will be reviewed, including: health and safety, the nature of chemical contamination, testing and risk assessment.

Part 2 deals with the reclamation and remediation of contaminated sites. The nature of contaminants, ground improvement methods and risk-based strategies for land reclamation and containment of pollutants will all be discussed.

Case studies will form important components of the course.

Assessment

  • Report: 25%
  • Examination - spring semester: 75%
Module codeEA4107
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module provides an holistic overview of the geological and environmental evolution of the continent of Antarctica as an Earth system using case studies drawn from the palaeoclimatic Antarctic and Southern Ocean research carried out within the School. Case studies could include, but are not restricted to, the growth of Antarctic ice sheets during the Cenozoic, the Quaternary environment of the Antarctic margin and cryosphere biogeochemistry.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeEA4110
LevelL7
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

For students with an interest in geomorphology, this fourth-year module offers an integrated perspective of landscape dynamics from mountain peaks to sandy beaches. Led by Drs Hales, Constantine, and Lazarus, the module will consider how processes and phenomena of tectonic geomorphology, fluvial geomorphology, and coastal geomorphology interact and inform each other. Students will have the opportunity to engage with big-picture concepts of landscape evolution both in the classroom and in the field.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
  • Presentation: 35%
  • Written assessment: 25%
Module codeEA4116
LevelL7
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module will describe Earth as a living planet and how during the last decades living microorganisms were detected in environments previously thought to be free of life (volcanic springs, ocean crust, subsurface ice of glaciers). It will be explained how microorganisms adapt to survive and thrive under extreme conditions. Life in rocks and sediments several hundred metres beneath the surface will play a particularly important role as the deep biosphere is an extreme but also the largest habitat on Earth, linking geosphere and biosphere processes. 

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeEA4117
LevelL7
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module investigates the inter-relationship between science and policy for coastal management, including coastal conservation. It will explore the use of science within policy for shoreline management and conservation, specifically addressing the types of scientific data required in policy development and how these are utilised in coastal management. A case study of coastal erosion and managed realignment will include a half day field visit and half day laboratory exercise with workshops to discuss the underlying issues of the quality of erosion data and its use in shoreline management.  The module will also explore the science-policy interface and will provide a framework for assessing barriers and opportunities for integration between science, policy and decision-making.  A second case study will enable students to investigate aspects of the institutional and policy context of the Severn Estuary and, in particular, to evaluate the scientific implications and context of a contemporary policy change relating to this area.

Assessment

  • Report: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeEA4118
LevelL7
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module will cover mineralizing processes at different scales and in different settings throughout Earth history, with an emphasis on mafic magmatism. The module will include sections on new technologies and on how mineral exploration might extend into new frontiers (under cover, in the oceans or in space). Students will undertake a simulated exploration campaign comprising; target selection, geochemistry and positioning of drill sites using various software packages.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
Module codeEA4119
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will focus on presenting knowledge and skills related to advanced Geodynamics, as informed by research.  It will take the general principles of dynamics and rheology and show how they impact on mantle and crustal geodynamics. The mantle global scale deformation will emphasise viscous deformation. While lower crustal viscous deformation will be compared to plastic and brittle features of the upper crust, at regional through to microstructure scales. The role of fluids in the crust will be emphasised.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 35%
  • Examination - spring semester: 65%
Module codeEA4123
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the leading international body for the assessment of climate change. It reviews and assesses the most recent scientific, technical and socio-economic information produced worldwide relevant to the understanding of climate change. Because of its scientific and intergovernmental nature, the IPCC embodies a unique opportunity to provide rigorous and balanced scientific information to decision makers. By endorsing the IPCC reports, governments acknowledge the authority of their scientific content. The work of the organization is therefore policy-relevant and yet policy-neutral, never policy-prescriptive.

Review is an essential part of the IPCC process, to ensure an objective and complete assessment of current information. This module builds on this principle. The most recent report of Working Group 1 of the IPCC (WG1: The Physical Science Basis) was published in 2013 (Assessment Report, AR5). The report made 19 provocative headline statements about the current state of knowledge on our climate, its drivers and where we are headed over the next 100 years. In this module, students will take turns in leading class debates on a selection of the headline statements, arguing either for or against their scientific credibility, based on an assessment of the underlying science.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 70%
  • Presentation: 30%
Module codeEA5130
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will introduce the students to the fundamentals of the structure and evolution of the Solid Earth including Plate Tectonic processes. This will start from the origin of elements and the formation of planet earth advancing to our understanding of its internal structure from a range of data types. It will then focus on providing an introduction to plate tectonics including a discussion of each significant type of plate boundary. It will end with a discussion of the rock cycle with a brief introduction to igneous and metamorphic rocks, and a brief comparison with other terrestrial planets, Venus and Mars.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
Module codeEA5131
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module examines how planet earth can be a dangerous place for human society.  It investigates the main types of hazard on Earth, their causes and consequences for the population.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
Module codeEA5132
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module introduces Geographical Information Systems (GIS) concepts and techniques; providing the basis to allow students to utilise GIS skills in other spatial modules and projects.  This includes teaching using leading GIS software, including extensions, tools and editing.  The module also provides students with knowledge and understanding of GIS theory and practice.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeEA6134
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This 10 credit Year 2 module is designed to introduce students to the wide variety of site investigation techniques applied to the collection of field data including surveying and remote sensing.  The module also covers statistical techniques of data analysis and the skills required in report writing.

To prepare the student to undertake independent fieldwork, involving knowledge and understanding of:

  • Field sampling, measurement and recording techniques;
  • Desk study methods and assessment of data quality;
  • Remote sensing techniques and application.
  • Integration of field and literature data in the context of the regional settings;
  • Adherence to laboratory and field codes of conduct;
  • Statistical analytical techniques.
  • To be able to visualize information clearly and concisely by appropriate means.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeEA6135
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Structural geology is the study of geological structures caused by deformation. This module focuses on describing and interpreting geological structures, and their integration into regional scale processes.

AIMS

  • To be able to describe the structures and geometry of deformed rock bodies
  • To understand how the geometry of deformed rock bodies is related to their evolution in three dimensions through time and space
  • To develop a simple understanding of the mechanics of rock deformation
  • To place structural observations and interpretations in tectonic context.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
  • Class test: 60%
Module codeEA6136
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This is a lecture-based module focussing on the chemistry of the Earth’s surface, the global element cycles and the driving chemical, physical, geological and biological processes. The module focuses on aquatic environments: Oceans, estuaries, lakes and rivers and the underlying sediments. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Class test: 70%
Module codeEA6137
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This Year 2 module covers the fundamental areas of igneous petrology,such as mineralogy, volcanology, geochemistry, volcanic hazards, magma chamber processes, mantle melting, and radiometric age dating.It will provide the knowledge and understanding to enable a greate r appreciation of how magmatism and volcanic processes have helped shape, and continue to shape, our planet. The practical aspects of this module will enable the development of such skills as: the petrographic identification, in both thin section and hand specimen, of common minerals found in igneous rocks;the graphical representation and interpretation of geochemical data and the use of petrographic information to help elucidate tectonic and magmatic processes.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
  • Class test: 70%
Module codeEA6138
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module advances on the GIS material taught in year 1; providing the basis to allow students to produce real-world GIS projects in other spatial modules and projects.  This includes teaching on using leading GIS software, including extensions, tools and editing.  The module also provides students with further knowledge and understanding of GIS theory and practice.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 75%
Module codeEA6139
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Catchments collect, integrate, and route the water resources that humans depend on to live. The physical processes occurring in catchments are constantly reshaping these environments, and control the form of the landscapes around us. They influence our vulnerability to natural hazards, the distributions of natural habitats, and societal resilience to climate change.

Understanding how catchment systems operate is key to the work done by many Earth scientists, whether researching the effects of anthropogenic change on the global system, attempting remediation of damaged habitats, or guiding policy for environmental management. This module will describe the fundamental geomorphological and hydrological processes operating in catchments, and how these shape the natural environment. In particular, the module will highlight the ways these processes are likely to be impacted by global change.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Class test: 70%
Module codeEA6140
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The emphasis of this module is to introduce the student to the interaction between ecosystems and the biota within each ecosystem type, the adaptations and acclimations of fauna and flora to their environment and the interactions between taxa. Concepts of productivity, resource dependent control, trophic cascade, biodiversity and biomass, evolutionary adaptation, acclimation, ecosystem types, species succession and zonation, key species analysis, bioengineers, habitat and conservation quality will be covered.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Class test: 50%
Module codeEA7130
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module is driven by the following question; How do climate and tectonics interact to create the world on which we live? We will use global examples to explore the range of processes that govern the distribution and creation of global landscapes.  The evolution of global landscapes has been discussed by geoscientists for over 100 years. We will journey through different landscape evolution theories and how they relate to modern geomorphic research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Class test: 60%
Module codeEA7131
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module outlines the basis of environmental management, providing insight into the objectives and principles of current European and UK environmental policy and management practice.  It exposes students to a selection of traditional, regulatory instruments designed to protect environmental quality as well as presenting an overview and evaluation of a range of other evolving techniques and approaches to environmental management and stewardship. The role and application of science within environmental management and policy is demonstrated throughout the module.

Aims:

  • To provide an insight into the objectives, principles and development of European and UK environmental policy and management practice
  • To present an overview and evaluation of a selection of the most commonly used environmental management techniques
  • To introduce the student to the key characteristics of a selection of legal and economic instruments designed to protect environmental quality.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 10%
  • Report: 30%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Class test: 50%
Module codeEA7132
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module provides an overview of surface and groundwater systems through an understanding of the hydrological cycle; the relationship between surface water resources, their management and control; the relationship between geology and aquifer properties and the occurrence of groundwater; the principles of groundwater flow, including flow to wells; water quality and contaminant hydrogeology; the sustainability of water supply.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 18%
  • Written assessment: 12%
  • Class test: 70%
Module codeEA7133
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will advance understanding of sedimentary processes and products and how these make up clastic and carbonate sedimentary environments and sequences. The module aims to develop critical thinking skills when applying stratigraphic and sediment provenance methods to modern and ancient outcrop and subsurface datasets, including boreholes and reflection seismic data. Case-studies will include shallow to deep marine settings where scientific drilling or hydrocarbon exploration occurs at present.

Assessment

  • Class test: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Class test: 70%
Module codeEA7134
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will introduce students to Engineering Geology. This is a challenging module examined entirely though coursework that requires teamwork and self­ motivated learning to deliver work of professional quality.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 35%
  • Report: 50%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeEA7135
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This is an advanced course in the acquisition, evaluation and interpretation of palaeobiological information, focusing on the origins and diversifications of major groups, the biology of extinct organisms, macroevolutionary patterns, and organism-environment interactions over geological timescales. We demonstrate the breadth and scope of palaeobiology in the Earth Sciences by examining selected topics at an advanced level. Within the course outline, specific content each year will reflect both the expertise and interests of the staff delivering it and topical and up to date advances and discoveries. The student will undertake field and practical work.

Assessment

  • Report: 20%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Class test: 65%
Module codeEA7136
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This year 3 module will introduce mechanics into structural geology, establishing a sound theoretical basis for understanding the origin of the structures that were described in the second-year structural geology subject. Displacements, strain and stress will be presented in the framework of continuum mechanics, and integrated through a consideration of rheology.

The student will be trained in state-of-the-art analytical methods for the processing and interpretation of data collected from a variety of structural environments.

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
  • Report: 20%
  • Class test: 60%
Module codeEA7137
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This third year unit in glaciology aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to:

  • Understand the physical processes which control glaciers and ice sheets
  • Appreciate the role of glaciers and ice sheets in the Earth’s system
  • Analyse and interpret glaciological datasets

A series of lectures will introduce the fundamentals of the science of glaciology, enable students to understand why and how datasets are collected, and practical sessions enable investigation of real datasets. 

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 25%
  • Class test: 75%
Module codeEA7138
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module is designed to provide students with a detailed knowledge of how scientists reconstruct past variations in climate and use these reconstructions to learn about the climate system and how it works. Starting with an introduction to the climate system, the course will begin with the tools of the trade (climate archives, proxies, dating methods) and move on to records of orbital and millennial-scale climate variability and ultimately the recent changes associated with the rise of man. The course covers many complex topics and students will be expected to research and present.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Class test: 70%
Module codeEA7139
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module involves a week-long field excursion that will examine the Environmental Geography issues associated with water use in a changing climate. This will involve investigating how communities and societies respond to the environmental challenges of water use, ecology, climate change, and the movement of pollutants and sediments through catchments. Students will focus on an Alpine catchment, where retreating glaciers provide the major source of water for drinking, power, and agriculture. Students will examine the pressures on water use given the potentially finite limitations on this resource.

Assessment

  • Report: 50%
  • Report: 50%
Module codeEA7140
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Much of our understanding of the past behaviour of oceans, and the interaction of oceans with global climate, is derived from the study of marine microfossils - this understanding is key to placing modern environmental changes into context.  The object of this module is to explore the morphology and palaeoecology of the major microfossil groups that are used for past ocean and climate reconstructions, including how they are analysed as proxies for parameters such as sea surface temperatures, ocean pH, ocean circulation and sea ice extent.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Class test: 50%
Module codeEA7141
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will focus on UK and international marine conservation issues and in particular will assess the quality and type of scientific data used to underpin conservation management and policy. The range of tools available for conservationists will be examined and knowledge and understanding of the fragility of the marine environment and the threats, whether natural or man induced, will be extended. The students will have the opportunity for discussion and debate on topical aspects of marine conservation.

Assessment

  • Report: 20%
  • Report: 30%
  • Class test: 50%
Module codeEA8130
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

All aspects of contaminated land will be addressed in this module, including the chemical principles that underpin understanding and control of contaminants in the environment.

Part 1 of the module considers the assessment and the environmental effects of contaminated land. Methods of investigation will be reviewed, including: health and safety, the nature of chemical contamination, testing and risk assessment.

Part 2 deals with the reclamation and remediation of contaminated sites. The nature of contaminants, ground improvement methods and risk-based strategies for land reclamation and containment of pollutants will all be discussed.

Case studies will form important components of the course.

Assessment

  • Report: 25%
  • Class test: 75%
Module codeEA8131
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module provides an holistic overview of the geological and environmental evolution of the continent of Antarctica as an Earth system using case studies drawn from the palaeoclimatic Antarctic and Southern Ocean research carried out within the School. Case studies could include, but are not restricted to, the growth of Antarctic ice sheets during the Cenozoic, the Quaternary environment of the Antarctic margin and cryosphere biogeochemistry.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Class test: 50%
Module codeEA8132
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will focus on presenting knowledge and skills related to advanced Geodynamics, as informed by research.  It will take the general principles of dynamics and rheology and show how they impact on mantle and crustal geodynamics. The mantle global scale deformation will emphasise viscous deformation. While lower crustal viscous deformation will be compared to plastic and brittle features of the upper crust, at regional through to microstructure scales. The role of fluids in the crust will be emphasised.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 35%
  • Class test: 65%
Module codeEA8133
LevelL7
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the leading international body for the assessment of climate change. It reviews and assesses the most recent scientific, technical and socio-economic information produced worldwide relevant to the understanding of climate change. Because of its scientific and intergovernmental nature, the IPCC embodies a unique opportunity to provide rigorous and balanced scientific information to decision makers. By endorsing the IPCC reports, governments acknowledge the authority of their scientific content. The work of the organization is therefore policy-relevant and yet policy-neutral, never policy-prescriptive.

Review is an essential part of the IPCC process, to ensure an objective and complete assessment of current information. This module builds on this principle. The most recent report of Working Group 1 of the IPCC (WG1: The Physical Science Basis) was published in 2013 (Assessment Report, AR5). The report made 19 provocative headline statements about the current state of knowledge on our climate, its drivers and where we are headed over the next 100 years. In this module, students will take turns in leading class debates on a selection of the headline statements, arguing either for or against their scientific credibility, based on an assessment of the underlying science.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 70%
  • Presentation: 30%