Dr Katie Mortlock

Dr Katie Mortlock

Lecturer

School of Optometry and Vision Sciences

Email:
mortlockke@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 29 2087 0553
Fax:
+44 29 2087 4859

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Research Overview

My research interests have focused on the clinical investigation of common ocular pathologies, such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Research conducted during my doctoral studies and early post-doctoral research centred on the objective and subjective assessment of visual function, with emphasis on clinical visual electrophysiology. These included the photopic negative response (PhNR) and S-cone electroretinogram (ERG), amongst other more standard photopic and scotopic ERG and visual evoked potential techniques.  More recently, I have investigated clinically detectable structural changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma using long wavelength laboratory optical coherence tomography.

Teaching Overview

I am joint Course Co-ordinator and Year Lead for the Preliminary Year at the School of Optometry and Vision Sciences. My teaching responsibilities therefore concentrate on this part of the course, although I also contribute to other modules in the first and third years.

Educational and Professional Qualifications

2001 PhD (Optometry and Vision Sciences) Cardiff University, UK
1996 Registration, General Optical Council, UK
1995 BSc (Hons), Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University​, UK

Professional memberships

  • Member of EUROMECH
  • Registered with the General Optical Council

Academic positions

2015 - present Lecturer (0.4 FTE), School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University
2013 - 2014 Teaching Fellow (0.4 FTE), School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University
2002 - 2013 Research Associate (part-time since 2004), School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University 
1996 - 1999 Clinical Demonstrator, School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University

Speaking engagements

  • 2012: Cornea to Cortex, School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, UK
  • 2012: UKEGS Update, Annual Congress of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, Liverpool, UK
  • 2011: UKEGS Annual Meeting, Manchester, UK
  • 2010: EUROMECH Colloquium 518, Imperial College, London, UK
  • 2010: UKEGS Annual Meeting, Liverpool, UK
  • 2009: UKEGS Update, Annual Congress of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, Birmingham, UK

Committees and reviewing

2015 - present Member of the IT committee
2015 - present Member of the Teaching and Learning Committee
2013 - present Learning Central Domain Administrator
2013 - present Member of the BSc Examinations Board
2013 - present Member of the BSc Board of Studies
2010 - 2011 Member of the I&E committee
2003 - 2013 Member of the Researchers' Forum

I am joint Course Co-ordinator and Year Lead for the Preliminary Year at the School of Optometry and Vision Sciences. My teaching responsibilities are therefore centred around the Preliminary Year, where I am module leader for OP0202, Systemic Pathology in Optometry and OP0205, Introductory Optometry.  I also contribute to OP0206, Written and Communication Skills.  

Away from the Preliminary Year, I am module leader for the first year module OP1108, Study Skills for Optometry.  I also oversee coursework for OP1204, Research and Study Skills and supervise third year research projects for OP3107.  I have also delivered a lecture on NHS research ethics for the WOPEC module OPT008, Study and Research Skills for Eye Care Professionals. 

Recent research has investigated structural changes within the optic nerve head (ONH), more specifically the lamina cribrosa and inner retina in open angle glaucoma using novel laboratory 1050nm optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT is an imaging technique which can provide high resolution, three dimensional images of ocular structures in vivo.  The use of longer wavelength light sources, such as 1050nm, increases tissue penetration and this enables the examination of deeper ocular structures such as the lamina cribrosa and choroid, which until recently have been virtually impossible to image in vivo.  The lamina cribrosa is a key structure in the pathogenesis of glaucoma, as it is thought to be the initial site of ganglion cell axonal damage.  Using 1050nm OCT, we have been able to examine and identify changes in the lamina cribrosa in subjects with early and advanced glaucoma.

This research has been undertaken as part of the work of the Optic Nerve Head Group led by Dr Julie Albon, with Prof Rachel North and Prof James Morgan and imaging support from Nick White and Dr James Fergusson from VSBL