Ewch i’r prif gynnwys
 Beatriz Rubio-Arribas

Beatriz Rubio-Arribas

University Teacher - Spanish

Ysgol Ieithoedd Modern

Email:
rubioarribasb@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 225 10101
Location:
2.40, 66a Plas y Parc, Cathays, Caerdydd, CF10 3AS

I joined the Hispanic Department at Cardiff University after completing the MA in Literature in European Cultures offered by the School of European Studies. From September 2002 to the present day, I have been involved in the teaching of a number of courses within the Spanish Section across all year groups 1, 2 and 4.

I joined the Hispanic Department at Cardiff University after completing the MA in Literature in European Cultures offered by the School of European Studies. From September 2002 to the present day, I have been involved in the teaching of a number of courses within the Spanish Section across all year groups 1, 2 and 4.

Prior to that I was a Spanish Lecturer at Cirencester College where I taught A’ Level and AS Spanish for Sixth Form students, GCSE and adult classes . I have also been an examiner for Edexcel and WJCB Examination Boards and I worked as a freelance translator for Sotheby’s.

I have published two books, ¡Es Español! and Juguemos todos juntos . These books are aimed to provide primary teachers with resources and activities to make the study of Spanish interesting and fun for pupils. These books have been co-authored with Kathy Williams and published by Brilliant Publications.

I am currently in the process of applying for a PhD. I will be focusing my research on Fictional Representations of the Spanish Civil War and Post War Spain: a feminine perspective. This will be a comparative study of the narrative of very different writers, who have chosen to place their female characters amidst Spain’s most turbulent time. Through these works, I would like to research in depth the role of women in this conflict. I am particularly interested in fictional accounts of historical events and stories where women bear the weight of the narrative. In some cases, these fictional characters interact freely with “real” characters and come alive amidst the narration of a historical event. All these novels attempt to reconstruct and rediscover our past and keep the memory of those involved alive. Some of the works that I intend to study would be, for example, the following: La voz dormida by Dulce Chacón, Inés y la alegría by Almudena Grandes or Donde nadie te encuentre by Alicia Giménez Bartlett, which was awarded the Nadal Prize in 2011.