Ewch i’r prif gynnwys

Optimeiddio iechyd trwy weithgarwch, ffyrdd o fyw a thechnoleg

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

O fewn ein thema rydym ni'n anelu at ddatblygu gwell dealltwriaeth o amodau ac opsiynau gofal gan ddefnyddio ymagwedd ryngddisgyblaethol.

Drwy'r ddealltwriaeth well hon, rydym ni'n datblygu ac yn gwerthuso asesiadau clinigol, ymyriadau a thechnolegau newydd i wella rheolaeth ar gyflyrau iechyd yn amrywio o boen cyhyrysgerbydol, gofal cardioanadlol, niwrolegol a mamolaeth.

Mae ein tîm uchel ei sgiliau'n gweithio ar draws Proffesiynau Iechyd Cyswllt a Bydwreigiaeth gyda phrofiad mewn ymchwil ansoddol, meintiol a dulliau cymysg. Mae ein hymchwil yn cynnwys datblygu a phrofi ymyriadau cymhleth a deall mecanweithiau clefydau a thriniaeth. Rydym ni'n gweithio'n agos gyda grwpiau defnyddwyr ac elusennau i wneud y gorau o ymgysylltu ac effaith.

Mae meysydd ymchwil cyfredol yn canolbwyntio ar y canlynol:

  • Asesiadau biofecanyddol o unigolion gyda chyflyrau cyhyrysgerbydol i ddeall mecanweithiau clefyd a thriniaeth.
  • Datblygu ymyriadau'n canolbwyntio ar gefnogi hunan-reoli a gweithgaredd corfforol i unigolion â chyflyrau tymor hir. Mae hyn ar gyfer oedolion a phlant gyda phoen cyhyrysgerbydol, anhwylderau cardioanadlol neu niwrolegol.
  • Profi diogelwch, effeithiolrwydd clinigol a/neu gost ymyriadau newydd o fewn gofal mamolaeth a beichiogrwydd
  • Archwilio defnydd o dechnoleg ddigidol mewn lleoliadau adsefydlu a chartref i gyfoethogi technegau asesu a thriniaeth

Mae ein haelodau'n ymgysylltu'n weithredol gyda pholisi iechyd, datblygu strategaeth, arloesi clinigol ac addysgol yng Nghymru a thu hwnt. Mae gennym ni brosiectau cydweithredol ar draws y DU ac mewn canolfannau allweddol yn yr UE ac yn fyd-eang.

Mae aelodau o'r thema ymchwil yn ymrwymo i gymorth cymheiriaid a mentora, ac adeiladu capasiti a gallu ar draws y rhwydwaith ymchwil iechyd a gofal cymdeithasol. Croesawir ceisiadau PhD ar bynciau sy'n ymdrin yn benodol â diddordebau ymchwil aelodau'r thema. Rydym ni'n annog myfyrwyr PhD a doethuriaeth broffesiynol i fod yn gyfranogwyr gweithredol yn y thema ymchwil drwy gyflwyno eu hymchwil a mynychu digwyddiadau thema.

Theme Lead

Kate Button

Dr Kate Button

Uwch-ddarlithydd a Cyfarwyddwr Llywodraethu Ymchwil

Email:
buttonk@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87734

Deputy theme lead

Gale, Nichola

Dr Nichola Gale

Uwch-Ddarlithydd: Ffisiotherapi

Email:
galens@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87758

Current research projects

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

It is estimated that up to 60,000 (9%) babies are born into water annually in the UK.

Professionals and parents have strong opinions on water birth. Some are great advocates, who promote the potential benefits of water birth to women, whilst others remain concerned that women may be taking additional unnecessary risks by giving birth in water.

The POOL study aims to answer the question about the safety of water births. The study will collect data on the births of all women in around 30 maternity units during 2015-2020. It will determine how many women are using birth pools, how many women give birth in water and whether mothers or their babies come to any extra harm as a result of water birth.

To do this without disturbing women in labour or just after birth, the study will use information collected as part of each woman’s pregnancy journey and linked baby maternity record stored at hospitals in computerised systems.

To keep women’s information confidential, the data stored in existing maternity information systems will have identifying information, such as names, addresses and NHS numbers removed before the information is sent to the research team at Cardiff University for analysis.

Funding

This project is funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme.

Research lead

Saunders, Julia

Yr Athro Julia Sanders

Athro Nyrsio Clinigol & Bydwreigiaeth

Email:
sandersj3@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87623

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Cancer is a leading and increasing cause of death and disability in Wales.

Lung cancer patients often have weight loss and rapid decline in function and quality of life. Physical activity can improve muscle strength and quality of life in cancer patients but there is little research to show the effects of exercise in cancer patients with weight loss.

A Welsh study has shown that patients with cancer and weight loss recognise the benefits of physical activity, but would prefer to take part in low intensity, home-based, physical activity.

Based on this, the aim of this study is to develop home-based physical activities with healthcare professionals and patients with lung cancer and weight loss, and to identify potential outcome measures to assess.

This mixed methods study will include four phases to identify suitable home-based physical activities and suitable outcome measures as follows:

  • phase 1 - a review of research
  • phase 2 - discussions with healthcare professionals in cancer/exercise
  • phase 3 - interviews with lung cancer patients and carers
  • phase 4 - consensus workshop with health professionals and patient representatives.

The findings from this study will inform research to help people with cancer be physically active to maintain function and quality of life.

Funding

This project is funded by the RCBC Wales.

Lead researchers

Gale, Nichola

Dr Nichola Gale

Uwch-Ddarlithydd: Ffisiotherapi

Email:
galens@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87758
Hopkinson, Jane

Yr Athro Jane Hopkinson

Athro Nyrsio

Email:
hopkinsonjb@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 88562

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Over the last ten years there has been an increase in research studies that have shown that exercise is safe and beneficial for people with Huntington's disease (HD).

However, evidence also shows that physical activity levels in people with HD remain low, so it would appear that there are challenges to this research being used within clinical practice. The aim of this study is therefore to explore how to promote physical activity within HD specific clinics.

We will invite staff from HD clinics and people with HD and their carers to a ‘Physical Activity’ event where everyone will be able to discuss how physical activity could be promoted within HD clinics. The discussions will be summarised and sent to all the people who attend the event. Staff from the HD clinics will be able to use this information to develop ways to change their practice to promote physical activity in people with HD.

The researcher will contact the HD clinics 6 and 12 months after the event to discuss what changes have taken place and whether staff feel that there have been any benefits for people with HD.

Funding

This project is funded by the Huntington’s Disease Association.

Lead researcher

Una Jones

Dr Una Jones

Darlithydd a Phennaeth Proffesiynol: Nyrsio Gofal Sylfaenol a Iechyd y Cyhoedd

Email:
jonesuf@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87789

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common lifelong condition affecting 1 in 100 people.

ASD affects how a person relates to others and the world around them. Difficulty responding to sensory information (noise, touch, movement, taste, sight) is common in ASD.

Sensory integration therapy (SIT) is a type of face-to-face therapy or treatment provided by trained occupational therapists (OT) who use play-based sensory-motor activities to influence the way the child responds to sensation, reducing distress and improving concentration and interaction with others.

Research suggests SIT might be helpful for some children. We are therefore interested in whether, compared to treatment normally offered to families (‘usual care’), SIT improves children’s behaviour socialisation and daily functioning.

Usual care could involve some contact with an occupational therapist (OT), who might give parents or carers strategies to practice at home with their child.

We will recruit 216 children and assess behaviour, daily functioning, socialisation, and parent/carer stress at six and 12 months. Participants will be allocated at random to either receive SIT or usual care. Discussion groups for therapists and carers will be organised before approaching people to take part for ‘usual care’ to be mapped out.

Funding

This project is funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme.

Research leads

Rachel McNamara

Dr Rachel McNamara

Senior Research Fellow, South East Wales Trials Unit Head of Trials Management

Email:
mcnamara@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2068 7614
Delport, Sue

Sue Delport

Uwch-Ddarlithydd ac Arweinydd Clinigol: Therapi Galwedigaethol

Email:
delportsm@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87790

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

In 2016, 29% of pedestrians killed or seriously injured in preventable road traffic collisions in Great Britain were children under the age of 15 years.

Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), a chronic disorder that affects fine and/or gross motor skills, may be more vulnerable at the roadside compared to their typically developing peers. Current methods of teaching road safety in schools are largely knowledge based and do not necessarily improve behaviour in real traffic situations.

The use of virtual reality may be a viable supplementary teaching method. This project aimed to explore whether children with and without DCD would more accurately locate safe road crossing sites in a virtual city, when the viewpoint was either first-person or third-person.

The findings suggest that typically developing children were more accurate in the first-person condition, whereas children with DCD were equally poor at identifying safe crossing sites in both conditions.

The difference between the performance of typically developing children and children with DCD cannot be explained by self-reported road crossing experience and tentatively suggests that multimodal methods may be needed to effectively teach road safety to children with DCD.

Funding

This project is funded by The Waterloo Foundation.

Research lead

Catherine Purcell

Dr Catherine Purcell

Uwch-ddarlithydd: Therapi Galwedigaethol

Email:
purcellc2@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 225 10961

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

Physiotherapy remains a cornerstone for musculoskeletal condition management.

However, concerns remain over how to accurately assess movement to evaluate progress, provide patient feedback and determine appropriate treatment options. This is largely because assessment is being undertaken using subjective outcome measures or inconsistent tools.

Our research has addressed this unmet need through the development of a novel portable toolkit. This uses affordable wearable technology allowing rigorous real-time movement assessment and feedback for patients and clinicians.

The next stage of our research is to integrate this toolkit into a new physiotherapy intervention. Before this we need to evaluate the attitudes of end-users (clinicians and patients) on user requirements, potential benefits and barriers and facilitators to integration in healthcare.

Therefore, in this engagement project we will organise drop-in sessions for patients and physiotherapists to experience the toolkit and provide feedback. This will be used to create an engagement video, informing patients and the public about our research and helping them understand how the toolkit should be integrated into healthcare as a new intervention.

Four roadshows with industry representation will be conducted in physiotherapy departments across Wales, which will demonstrate and share learning opportunities to end-users about the toolkit and its usage in patient care.

Funding

This project is funded by The Wellcome Trust.

Research lead

Mo Al Amri

Dr Mohammad Al-Amri

Cydymaith Ymchwil

Email:
al-amrim@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87115

Project team

Kate Button

Dr Kate Button

Uwch-ddarlithydd a Cyfarwyddwr Llywodraethu Ymchwil

Email:
buttonk@caerdydd.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 206 87734