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The Centre for Global Labour Research (CGLR)

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Our Purpose

The Centre for Global Labour Research (CGLR) brings together social researchers from Cardiff Business School and Cardiff School of Social Sciences who study work and workers.

The activities of the Centre embrace five themes. First, we research today’s workforce, its changing composition, experiences of working life and the identities people bring to their work. Second, we research work: how it is designed, managed and controlled and how its benefits are distributed between employers and employees and across the population. Third, we are interested in the representation of workers through trade unions and other institutions and movements that give working people a voice. Fourth, we examine the regulation of work broadly conceived, through markets, management, employee participation, law and other forms of governance. Fifth, we focus on the intersection of labour and other progressive movements pursuing social and environmental justice in local, national and global contexts.

Our work is both local and global in scope. We research the rapidly changing employment scene in Wales as the country adjusts to a post-industrial age. But we also look beyond; to developments across the United Kingdom, in continental Europe and on a truly global scale.

The work of the Centre aims to promote new understandings of labour but our ultimate purpose is to contribute to the improvement of working life. To this end we seek to work closely as researchers with trade unions and other movements and organizations committed to a fairer settlement at work.

CGLR carries out research and has an extensive series of publications. The Centre also hosts academic visitors from overseas, including some of the primary international researchers on work and workers, and organizes an annual series of events that include research workshops, seminars, public lectures and conferences.

 

News

Reassessing the Employment Relationship

Reassessing the Employment Relationship

Reassessing the Employment Relationship is an important collection of essays that offers a multidisciplinary and wide-ranging analysis of the contemporary workplace. Issues addressed include the juridification of employment relations, trade union revitalization, globalization, financialization, labour standards, equality and diversity and the transition to a service-based economy. Two of the editors of the book, Edmund Heery and Peter Turnbull, are members of CGLR and several other members (Rick Delbridge, Marco Hauptmeier, Jean Jenkins, David Nash, Mike Reed, Hugh Willmott) have contributed chapters. All of the 21 authors are based at Cardiff University. Order here.

 

Amnesty International and Trade Unions in Britain

Launch of Amnesty History

At this year’s TUC annual conference in Manchester, Amnesty International UK launched a new history of its relations with trade unions. Amnesty International and Trade Unions: Thirty Years of Solidarity for Human Rights was written by Edmund Heery, Professor of Employment Relations at Cardiff Business School and co-director of CGLR. The book examines Amnesty’s close relationship with unions in Britain, an enduring and successful case of joint work between the labour and human rights movements. The book is published by Amnesty International UK from whom copies can be ordered: Order details

 

Social Movements: The Key Concepts

Social Movements: Key Concepts

Another related publication by a member of CGLR is Social Movements: Key Concepts, Routledge 2010. Written by Graeme Chesters and Ian Welsh (co-director of CGLR) this important book reviews our knowledge of social movements, including the ‘old’ social movements that emerged in the 19th Century, the ‘new’ social movements of the 20th Century and the rise of contemporary ‘network’ movements. The book is available in paperback (15.99) ISBN: 978-0-415-43115-6. Order details and discount offer

 

Forthcoming Events

25/05/2011 CGLR/Wales TUC - Janice Fine (Rutgers University) - Organising the unorganised: lessons from America

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