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Dr Matthew Baker 


 I studied a family of bacterial toxins known as ‘Superantigens’ using both structural techniques (Xray crystallography, circular dichroism,) and a range of immunological assays.

I studied a family of bacterial toxins known as ‘Superantigens’ using both structural techniques (Xray crystallography, circular dichroism,) and a range of immunological assays.

I graduated from the University of Bath in 1998 with a BSc in Biochemistry. I retained some ties with the University by carrying out my PhD in conjunction with Bath and the Public Health Laboratories at Porton Down, Salisbury. I studied a family of bacterial toxins known as ‘Superantigens’ using both structural techniques (Xray crystallography, circular dichroism,) and a range of immunological assays.

After Graduating, I returned to the University of Bath as a lecturer, funded by the Leverhulme Trust. I expanded my interests to include proteins involved in inflammation and angiogenesis. To this end, I began looking at several members of the Ribonuclease A family as a model system for structure-based inhibitor design. Other research interest include:

Drug design/structural analysis of isoforms of Carbonic anhydrase II, a protein associated with diseases such as glaucoma, cancer and obesity;

Ultra-high resolution structural analysis of α -1,3 galactosyltransferase (α 3GT), a protein expressed in many mammalian species, but absent from humans, apes and old world monkeys due to mutational inactivation of the gene. This represents one of a number of barriers to xenotransplantation, as a large fraction of antibodies are directed against the α-Gal epitope.

In August 2007 I moved to Cardiff.