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Royal Visits 2002

Prince Charles opens the Centre for Business Relationships, Accountability, Sustainability and Society

The health and social benefits of local food production and the impact of complex business relationships on sustainable development topped the agenda when His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales led a discussion at Cardiff University.

The Prince opened the University’s new Centre for Business Relationships, Accountability, Sustainability and Society. During an hour long discussion he heard from University experts from the disciplines of business, law, engineering and city and regional planning, as well as from University collaborators from business, producers and government and other organisations.

Prince Charles and the Vice-Chancellor enter the building.

The Vice-Chancellor, Dr David Grant, leads Prince Charles into the Glamorgan Building.

Measures to promote local food production and increased access to nutritious, locally-produced food was an area of particular interest. Participants included representatives from two inter- disciplinary research centres - the Regeneration Institute and the new Centre for Business Relationships, Accountability, Sustainability and Society (BRASS). Funded by a £ 3.1 million award from the ESRC, BRASS is the UK’s largest research centre dedicated to issues of business sustainability and social responsibility and the only ESRC centre in Wales.

A meeting of BRASS during the royal visit of 2002.

Dr Grant opens the discussion by outlining some of the related issues he had experienced in the world of industry.

Director of the BRASS Centre, Professor Ken Peattie outlined his team’s work, which addresses some of the most high profile issues on the business agenda. These include an investigation into the handling of the foot and mouth crisis; an enquiry into the role that non-executive directors play in maintaining standards of corporate behaviour in the light of the Enron and Worldcom scandals and a study of the impacts that new environmental legislation is having on UK companies.

Prince Charles unveils a plaque

Prince Charles unveils a plaque formally opening the Centre for Business Relationships, Accountability, Sustainability and Society watched by the Centre’s Director, Professor Ken Peattie.

"Businesses need to know how they can make substantive progress and overcome the many barriers that exist, and this is where academic research plays an important part in helping to understand the changes that are needed," said Professor Peattie.

Prince Charles recieves a book from the Vice-Chancellor.

The Vice-Chancellor presents Prince Charles with a copy of Cardiff University: A Celebration.

The Vice-Chancellor welcomes Prince Charles to the University

The Vice-Chancellor, Dr David Grant, welcomes Prince Charles to the University.

Prince Charles meets Professor Aspinall

Prince Charles meets Professor Rod Aspinwall, who chaired the discussion at the first meeting of the Centre for Business Relationships, Accountability, Sustainability and Society

Prince Charles meets Professor Terry Marsden.

Prince Charles meets Professor Terry Marsden, co-director of the BRASS centre and Head of the Department of City and Regional Planning.

Prince Charles with wellwishers

The Prince talks to wellwishers before being taken to the University


Princess Anne speaks at the opening of the Hydroinformatics Conference in Cardiff

The Princess Royal congratulated Cardiff University scientists for work which is contributing to the management of water-related issues locally and world-wide.

Her Royal Highness Princess Anne said Cardiff and Bristol universities provided UK centres of expertise in these areas. Speaking at the opening of the Hydroinformatics Conference in Cardiff, organised by the two universities, she praised both for supporting an international approach to research and understanding in this area. The conference was attended by more than 300 delegates from more than 45 countries.

HRH Princess Anne is presented with a posy by Sarah Falconer.

 

Princess Anne with Professor Roger FalconerVice-Chancellor Dr David Grant watches as HRH Princess Anne is presented with a posy by Sarah Falconer.

Through her responsibilities on behalf of many charities Princess Anne has considerable knowledge and experience of water management issues, particularly those affecting third world countries.

"An integrated approach, involving many disciplines, is important," she said. "So too is collaboration and communication. It is also important to recognise the limitations of models and knowledge when dealing with an unpredictable natural environment. Humility in the face of natural forces is wise. Your recognition of uncertainty is a strength, but it is one which you will not be thanked for."

Princess Anne meets some of the School of Engineering's support staff.

HRH Princess Anne meets a group of support staff from the School of Engineering.

The science of hydroinformatics uses sophisticated computer models to analyse the laws of nature and predict flood levels in rivers. These models can also predict levels of sediment and bacteria - giving early warning of disease and contamination.

Combined with networking technology, including the mobile ‘phone, scientists can provide farmers in India and Bangladesh with instant and readily understandable information, helping them to plan when best to harvest. Hydroinformatics can also help local environmental agencies, disaster agencies or the fire services to prepare for the onset of major storms.

The keynote conference address was given by Mrs Vaijayanti Bendre, the Director of Central Water and Power Research Station in Pune, the premier research institution in India. She described how India is rising to the challenge of managing water resources, based on a host of projects ranging from flood control and irrigation to discharge of effluents and structural and foundation engineering.

The conference was organised by Professors Roger Falconer, of Cardiff University’s School of Engineering and Director of the University’s Environmental Water Management Research Centre, and Professor Ian Cluckie, Director of the Water and Environmental Management Research Centre at the University of Bristol, in association with the International Association for Hydraulic Engineering and Research, the International Water Association and the International Association of Hydrological Sciences. The Conference is also endorsed by the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management and the Environmental Agency. Sponsors of the event are: Cardiff City Council, Halcrow Group Ltd, Bristol Water and South West Water.

Princess Anne with Professor Roger Falconer

Professor Roger Falconer, of Cardiff University’s School of Engineering and Director of the University’s Environmental Water Management Research Centre (left) with HRH Princess Anne

"Rapid urbanisation presents increasing challenges of how to ensure a sustainable water environment and adequate water supplies for our future generations," said Professor Falconer. "For scientists and water engineers these are global, not local challenges, and it is crucial that we exchange ideas and experiences. Communities simply cannot live without water and in this respect it is our most precious commodity."